Introduction to Inclined Bed Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

New members should feel free to introduce themselves here

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Tue Feb 17, 2009 12:10 pm

Sharon, if you decide to try inclined bed therapy, could you please take some before and druring IBT photographs of your veins as this will be very useful to help others determine what is happening to your veins?

I have provided two photographs on the POll question in the general section of the forum. These show 10 weeks of IBT and 6 months of IBT changes.

Andrew
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Postby AndrewKFletcher » Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:43 am

http://bibamed.agcl.com/cx_2007/Tue%201 ... amboni.pdf

Read the relationship between posture and pressure changes inside the venous return. Although Zamboni addresses the change in pressure from horizontal rest to standing and identifies a corresponding reduction in the cross section of the internal jugular vein, the same pressure changes must apply to sleeping on an inclined bed compared to a flat bed.


Below is an anecdotal report from a person with ms that is using Inclined Bed Therapy and has been sleeping on an incline for 14 years.

Dear Mr Fletcher, thank you so much for raising my bed. I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis twenty six years ago and have been paralysed many times.

Before raising my bed (April 96)

1. I had muscle spasm in my legs, especially in the morning and at night.
2. I had problems walking with weakness in my right leg. I was shaky and needed a stick.
3. I had a muscle weakness in my left eye.
4. I had a painful lump on my calf muscle which was growing, an orthopaedic condition (osteochondrmatosis which results in oedema). I had difficulty with my ankle and on-going physiotherapy was essential.
5. I was suffering weight loss.
6. I had asthma and used inhalers.
7. I had bad sinusitis and needed physiotherapy and inhalers.

Since raising my bed

1. I no longer get muscle spasm in my legs.
2. My walking is much improved. I do not use my stick anymore.
3. The eye weakness is much improved. It only ‘wanders’ when I am very tired.
4. The lump has shrunk to a small flat area; there is no pain, just a feeling of slight pressure. Physiotherapy is no longer required.
5. My weight has increased by over half a stone
6. The asthma is much improved-the inhaler was only needed a couple of times this summer for high pollen count level.
7. My sinusitis is much improved and less painful. Physiotherapy is no longer needed and I only occasionally use an inhaler.

I do not have the exhaustion, I feel more energetic and less tired. My ms is more stable; one day is more like the next and not so erratic. Raising my bed has brought positive results and continues to do so. I feel stronger as the months go by.

Further letter:

I forgot to mention the following information in my letter, concerning my improvement since raising my bed.
My balance has improved, I have had no relapses and my hair is in better condition and there is more of it!!.

My bladder control is much better, particularly at night. This is a real bonus!

Other people including nurses. Medics and friends, have remarked how much better I am.
They are amazed that my MS stayed stable when a painful operation without any anaesthetic (at my own request) to help keep my ms stable.
Everyone I amazed at the absence of my stick.

Best wishes (name omitted)
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Postby gibbledygook » Wed Feb 25, 2009 11:56 am

Please could you explain how pressure will be reduced in the azygous vein, given that blood is meant to flow upwards from the base of the spine to the head in this vein? I suppose that this must be the same for the varicose veins of the legs. Do you recommend the same upward tilted head for varicose veins in the leg as for spinal venous stenoses? I'm really struggling with the idea that increasing the gradient is going to help the spinal vein reflux given it's proper directional flow is against gravity.

Is it like the plastic tube analogy with colored salt and plain water? Does that mean oxygenated blood is pushing down more effectively on the deoxygenated blood system?! How the hell am going to persuade my husband to raise the bed?!!!!!
3 years antibiotics, 06/09 bilateral jug stents at C1, 05/11 ballooning of both jug valves, 07/12 stenting of renal vein, azygos & jug valve ballooning,
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Postby AndrewKFletcher » Sat Feb 28, 2009 3:37 pm

C R Acad Sci Hebd Seances Acad Sci D. 1978 Oct 30;287(11):1011-4.

[Reversal of human ophthalmic vein blood flow : selective cooling of the brain]


Caputa M, Perrin G, Cabanac M.

Direction of blood flow in angularis oculi veins was recorded in humans. In mild hypothermia, blood flow was weak and directed from brain to face. In hyperthermia, however, blood flowed rapidly in the opposite direction, angularis oculi vein collecting cool facial blood and supplying cavernous sinus. Therefore selective cooling of human brain is possible.
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From OldDragon on the Naked Scientists forum

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Sun Mar 08, 2009 1:42 am

From OldDragon on the Naked Scientists forum
Original post date: 09-09-2008, 07:00 PM
In December '91, I injured my spine (both lumbar and thoracic regions) in a fall down some steps where a builder had left loose roofing felt, and like a loose stair carpet. Some twelve years later, it was finally realised that my SI joint was locked up into the wrong position. A week ago, and nearly seventeen years later, I was finally diagnosed as having arachnoiditis in the thoracic region.

During this time, I've experienced considerable weight gain, circulatory problems and oedema.

I could tell you a horror story, including tales of doctors and specialists who wrote me off as being a hyperchondriac, having psychosomatic pains, and even those who wanted to refer me to a psychiatrist when I complained of feeling as if I'd insects crawling over my back. I also had some serious side-effects from medications, and came close to taking my own life about fourteen years ago - that, I believe, due to the negatively mind-altering effects of the combination of drugs I was being prescribed. In the end, the senior partner at the surgery even told me to go away and learn to live with it!

Well, I didn't have much option, but I did find one doctor at the practice who was willing to listen and to work with me to try and find a balance in the medications that would work for me, without unwanted side effects, and who wasn't afraid to admit it when he didn't have the answers.

During that time, I was constantly being told to raise my feet to address the oedema. It reduced slightly when my weight was off my feet, but after a day of being on my feet, would be back as bad as ever again. My blood pressure was well elevated and all over the place, but rarely under 145/85.

My doctor was at a loss to know how to help me, but a couple of months ago, and when I stumbled upon and read about Andrew's IBT study, what he said about the solutes and gravity made logical sense to me, and, after consulting my doctor - when I was told that he didn't see any reason why I shouldn't try it, but to expect my oedema to get worse - I raised the head end of my bed 6" and commenced sleeping at that angle.

Within just a couple of days, the oedema in my legs had reduced significantly. Indeed, the measurement around my calves was up to 5cms (about 2.5") less than pre-IBT, and although increasing a little again during the daytimes at first, for the last few weeks there's been no significant difference between measurements taken in the mornings and evenings. In fact, I can now actually see my shin bones, and even feel the odd chip in those from injuries sustained in my teens!

My doctor really is amazed, and also at the significant improvement in my blood pressure, and, of late, I have started to notice a considerable lessening of the incidents and strength of muscle spasms and cramps in my ribcage, that relate to the arachnoiditis.

It's still early days, as I've only been using IBT a couple of months, but during that time I've also been undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer, so you can imagine that, finding myself experiencing days without any back pain at all or only a little aching in my lower spine and from osteoarthritis/wear and tear after the 12 years that was affected by having my SI joint out of position, and after so long spent living with chronic and often severe and crippling back pain, I feel as if a miracle has occurred!

For the last few weeks, I've hardly taken any anti-inflammatory medication, either. This because I was advised at the cancer hospital to avoid it, if possible due to the effect of the chemo on my blood platelets, and because what I have found works best for me as an anti-inflammatory to keep the arachnoiditis under some form of control on a daily basis is simple, old fashioned aspirin or the salicylic acid based ones.

I can ONLY speak for myself, and based upon my own experience, because I don't have any medical qualifications, only experience of those conditions that I do have. (My background is, however, psychology related.)
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IBT and Botox Resited from Squirrel on the Nakedscinet Forum

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Sun Mar 08, 2009 1:48 am

The following posts are well worth reading as they relate to Inclined Bed Therapy building up an impressive resistance tp botox induced paralysis.


Squirrel
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MessageID: 187766
28/07/2008 16:15:33 »


My Inclined Bed Therapy Experience.
5 years ago I inclined my bed to help with asthma and nasal problems – that worked wonderfully, I breathe quite easily now, however, over the past 28 years I have had several operations to remove and repair varicose veins, Which had recurred four times already and I was told by the surgeon that they would recur again. Both my mother and maternal grandmother suffered dreadfully with this complaint. I enjoy walking and the thought of eventually developing leg ulcers was quite terrifying to me as it would be to anyone, but my legs are fine now without even a hint of blue lines let alone lumps the size of walnuts, furthermore I have not suffered with any swelling in my legs or ankles since I began IBT.
It hadn’t occurred to me that I no longer had a varicose vein problem because that wasn’t why I’d inclined my bed in the first place, that was a brilliant unexpected bonus.
The downside of having the bed inclined is that I tried ‘Botox’ (as we ladies of a certain age might) and it only worked for about a week. The cosmetic surgeon was amazed that the paralyzed muscles in my face repaired themselves so quickly. She said I should console myself with the fact that if I should ever have a stroke my facial muscles would be back to normal in double quick time!
When I go away on holiday where I don't have an inclined bed I have noticed that my nasal passages are usually blocked for part of the morning, and I feel quite sluggish and apparently my snoring is deafening. My partner suggests that we pack a few bricks into the cases so that he can get a decent night's sleep.







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MessageID: 188077
30/07/2008 10:07:37 »


Hi Squirrel Thank you for posting these valuable observations with repeated varicose vein surgery and your experience with using Botox. Both are fascinating, when first mentioned this was a revelation for me as I have been involved with neurological conditions as you know for many years and this proves what I have been stating about nerves recovering from impact or degenerative disease using Inclined Bed Therapy.

It’s a pity there are not more people using IBT that have tried botox to confirm this, but it would provide a great method of testing and compiling a protocol for a study to confirm the efficacy of IBT for spinal injury and other neurological conditions. If memory serves me well, you had this procedure repeated and the outcome was the same with a rapid recovery more than once? I have learned of several professional therapists in the USA who specialise in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation are already advising their patients to use IBT.

It is good to learn that you will not need further surgery on your veins in the foreseeable future and this can only mean than because the pressure inside the veins which was causing them to become swollen has now been reduced. Indicating that surgery success rates can be raised considerably and therefore substantially reducing the cost to the health service and the private patients.

It is great to learn about other implications for IBT and they are very important observations in their own right requiring further investigation and a controlled study to prove or disprove them.






Hi Andy,
Thanks for your reply - yes I did have botox on more than one occasion as the cosmetic surgeon couldn't believe that it had not worked for longer than 1 week so she gave me a freebie as an apology, however this only lasted a week as well so when I returned to see her again she said she couldn't give me any more as she had already given me more than she felt comfortable with, in fact is was a dose suitable for a large man (she said) and as I am only 5'-2" tall she was worried about overdosing. Guess I shall just have to put up with the wrinkled forehead!

Thanks for the confirmation. So here we have the same response to recovery from a botox injection known to cause paralysis in the nerve endings.

http://health.howstuffworks.com/botox1.htm
What is Botox?
Botox® is a trade name for botulinum toxin A. In this way, Botox® is related to botulism. Botulism is a form of food poisoning that occurs when someone eats something containing a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Botulinum toxin A is one of the neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum.
The most serious symptom of botulism is paralysis, which in some cases has proven to be fatal. The botulinum toxins (there are seven -- types are A through G) attach themselves to nerve endings. Once this happens, acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter responsible for triggering muscle contractions, cannot be released. A series of proteins, VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP-25, are essential for the release of acetylcholine. Certain botulinum toxins attack these proteins. Botulinum toxin A (Botox) affects the SNAP-25.

Basically, the botulinum toxins block the signals that would normally tell your muscles to contract. Say, for example, it attacks the muscles in your chest -- this could have a profound impact on your breathing. When people die from botulism, this is often the cause -- the respiratory muscles are paralyzed so it’s impossible to breathe.
At this point, you may be wondering why anyone would want to have a botulinum toxin injected into his or her body. The answer is simple: If an area of the body can't move, it can't wrinkle.


Yet you have indicated that you have built up an immunity to botox regaining the nerve fuction after 1 week using inclined bed therapy, not once but two times and one time using a higher than normal dose of the neurotoxin. This is astonishing and requires further investigation in its own right!

Thank you for this. I have just the person in mind that should learn of your observations. A Doctor Wise Young from the Carecure forum who is involved with spinal cord injury research. I will write to him and ask him for a comment.
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Postby skydog » Mon Mar 09, 2009 6:29 pm

Andrew I split a ceder 4x4 into some long wedges for our bed. The wedge gave me just shy of 4'' of lift. Last night was the first night on it. so far so good. I entered into my log the results as follows. Wife left for the couch after a couple of hrs. She couldn't quite get used to it yet. She said her body kept telling her to get flat. She was successful with a afternoon nap today. So she will give it a go again tonight. As for me I liked the feeling right away and slept great !!! Last night was the first night in a very long time that I didn't have to get up for a pee break before morning. When I did wake for a spell at around my usual 3 am I could actually feel the blood flowing. Felt great and quickly fell back asleep. Thank You !! Sometimes the simplest things are so easily overlooked. Great discovery... Peace and Health Mark
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Welcome onboard Mark

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Tue Mar 10, 2009 10:49 am

Thank you for providing feedback after one night. The nighttime urination frequency is not just a problem for people with ms but this irritating problem affects a large number of people with a whole range of illnesses and can be easily corrected with IBT.

We all know that when we feel cold we can’t stop urinating. Sleeping on an incline as discussed on another thread improves the body’s ability to remain warm during the night rather than dropping the two degrees associated with sleeping flat. This means our body is able to evaporate more water, hence the suggestion to replace this water loss by having a glass of water by the bedside and drinking a little more during the day, perhaps an extra litre would suffice but you will be a better judge than me on this.

I can relate to your wife’s reaction to tilting the bed completely. Imagine being the first woman to watch her husband put their bed on blocks and say “in the interests of science” Lol or something like that.

At least we have some knowledge of the possibilities with IBT now. Keep that diary going and when pain arrives, remember it is doing so because there is a connection between the area causing the pain and the brain. This is important to remember as the months go by because at times you will feel like there is nothing more to be gained but the evidence suggests there is a lot to be gained from prolonged avoidance of a flat bed for people with ms and other neurological conditions.

A friend of mine has joined the forum named Terri Harrison, she is going to share her experience using IBT for 11 years. I contacted Terri again recently for the first time in many years to ask if she was still sleeping inclined and if so how was she finding the therapy.

I will let Terri bring us all up to date as I am sure it will sound much more convincing from a person living with ms.

Once again, thank you Mark for deciding to put this to the test.

Andrew
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Postby skydog » Tue Mar 10, 2009 11:13 am

Andrew Great to here back from you !! I will be paying close attention to how we progress. I say we cause my wife wont give up her spot on the bed. So in the interest of science we press on... Last night I slept even better. Wife got up when her leg started hurting. She will probably gain as much or more from the IBt. She did comment that her feet felt much warmer than expected. I like the new in the buff sleeping. Just like old times... Wont go into to that one further here. Peace and Health Mark
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Postby AndrewKFletcher » Wed Mar 11, 2009 3:06 pm

Mark your welcome and great that your wife has already noticed her feet are warmer, an observation made by many testing IBT.

The following link is an introduction I wrote many years ago on the discovery in circulation.

It opens with a blast across the bows for Physics by attacking the misconception that gravity is a weak force rather than the most powerful force known to us. A huge debate ensued on several physics forums proclaiming it to be the weakest of all forces but based upon a tiny proportion of gravity against an equal proportion of the magnetic and nuclear forces. On the face of it their argument would show a nuclear bomb being far more powerful, until I explained that as powerful as it may be, it still does not escape the gravitational force from the Earth and the familiar mushrooming could is only a mushroom because of the Earth's atmospheric pressure keeping a lid on the explosion. A magnet was used to show how it could easily liberate a metal object from the earth’s surface, until I added that the person or object holding the magnet remains un-liberated from the surface.

I mention these points because there are many people reading this who feel simply tilting a bed cannot have a significant affect on human physiology. One only has to read what happens to astronauts exposed to microgravity to realise this is without foundation and that the Earth’s gravitational field has a profound restorative and stabilising affect on every living organism found here, including you and I.

My point being it is wrong to discount the effects of gravity, as is more than capable of surpassing anything we could ever throw at it.

http://www3.sympatico.ca/slavek.krepelk ... ceRevw.htm
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A testimonial, one of many

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Sun Apr 12, 2009 1:31 am

Good News! I'm Finally Getting Good Results.Monday, 14-Jun-1999 13:46:10Message:205.188.195.53 writes:I've been doing the inclined bed since January. I've had M.S. for over 20 years -diagnosed in 1986 as relapsing-remitting M.S. Two years ago, I had a serious attack and ended up in the hospital for 2 weeks paralyzed from the waist down-no feeling and no motion. After a couple of months of steroids and other drugs, I became able to walk first with a walker and then with a cane very short distances.I was still left with lots of fatique, weak legs, balance problems, painful pins and needles in the legs and feet, abdominal muscle spasms, incontinance, and sleepless nights. My diagnosis became secondary progressive M.S.I decided to get off all drugs(much to my neurolist's dismay).I then found Betty Iams on the computer and began her regimen of strict diet, exercise, supplements, meditation, and I've added acupuncture. It feels great to be in control. This is a lifetime regimen for me. I'd been coasting along not getting better, but not getting worse when I read about the inclined bed. I decided to try it-what could I lose? Right away, the painful abdominal muscle spasms started to subside and sleep became somewhat better. Then nothing happened. Then I started getting worse. I decided to give up the inclined bed -this after 3 months. One problem, however-I can't sleep on a flat bed anymore! Andrew wrote for me to hang in there that it was expected that I get worse before I get better. Everyday I waited. Then like Andrew said, I started getting better and better. This past month has been amazing! I even walked up and down a flight of stairs with my cane unaided. Fatigue has gone, the abdominal muscle spasms have gone, t he painful pins and needles are subsiding, leg strength is getting better so that I can walk greater distances, and balance is much better. I still have incontinance and sleep problems, but given time, I know those problems will be gone, too. One very interesting thing happened with my eyes recently. I'm very nearsighted and had my prescription for my contacts checked 3 months ago. Last week, I went back to the eye doctor's complaining that I just couldn't see. He checked my eyes again and much to his amazement, he found that they had improved greatly since my check-up 3 months ago!I wrote Andrew about this happening and he feels that sleeping on an inclined bed can help the optic nerve to regenerate and repair the damage of long term M.S.Let me encourage anyone who is trying the inclined bed to stick with it and don't think it won't work. I'm proof it can. My whole family and I are so grateful to Andrew Fletcher. Liz SteinbrueckLiz Steinbrueck


====================================
The genetic factor in MS
====================================

Those of you who know my family MS history know that my mother had her first MS episode when I was seventeen years old and was diagnosed with relapsing/remitting MS a few years later. She has spent the last 35 years in a wheelchair. Mother is now 80 years old and has resided in a nursing home for the past 12+ years. I was diagnosed at the age of 58 with primary progressive MS, and my youngest brother was diagnosed in his early 40's.

I have a daughter who by her choice has not been part of my life for a number of years. I had not heard from her in 12 years and had no idea where she was or how to contact her until a few weeks ago. She contacted me because she was being evaluated for MS and wanted to know the details about her grandmother's MS. She was shocked to learn that I now have it also.

She has now been diagnosed with relapsing/remitting MS. It was a tremendous blow to me as well as, of course, it was to her. She was very fortunate in finding a very well-informed neurologist. He is the first neurologist I have heard of who recommended the exact same approach as the program I follow and recommend.

In addition, several important things he pointed out to her I would like to share with you.

No. 1 ATTITUDE and SELF-TALK: He told her that her attitude and her self-talk formed the foundation of her wellness program. He stressed that her biggest enemy is the fear factor. He pointed out that many, many people live long, healthy, active lives with MS, and that her best chance of doing that was to not let a fear of what might happen enter into her thoughts or the words she says.

No. 2 MS IS NOT A DISEASE BUT RATHER A WAY OF LIFE: He encouraged her to never think of MS as a disease or illness, but to always look at it as a way of life.

I am making an effort to get this young neurologist to write something for my newsletter. The diet suggestions he gave my daughter are identical to those I recommend, together with stress reduction, avoiding fatigue, avoiding activities in the summer when it is hot, etc.

I frequently hear people with MS down-play the genetic factor because no one else in their family has MS. They totally miss the point. It doesn't matter nearly so much what went before in your family as it does the children of the person with MS. No one in my mother's family prior to her had ever had MS, but now there are four of us.

The approximate numbers are these: In the general population approximately 1 in 1000 in the US get MS. If a parent has it the numbers are approximately 1 in 50. If a sibling has it the numbers are approximately 1 in 25.

Had my daughter been in touch with me in the years since my diagnosis I would have recognized her early signs years ago. Actually she has had it longer than I have. It has taken 10 years for her exacerbations to become severe enough for a diagnosis. My son is much aware of the familial predisposition in our family, and takes the exact same nutritional supplements I do. It seems to me that if such a program helps me stay ahead of MS, it should help to minimize his chances of developing it.

What does all this mean for you. If you are a parent and you have MS, your children of any age are at a higher than average risk to develop it also. You don't tell this to young children of course, but when they are at an age to handle it, they should be made aware of their risk. It is also important that they not live in fear of developing MS, or any other physical challenge which has a genetic factor. We all came into this life with genetic predispositions. Most of the time we do not develop whatever that predisposition might lead to. That is the important message to tell sons, daughters and siblings of the person who has multiple sclerosis.

To date we do not know what the genetic factor is that predisposes one to MS. It is generally called a familial predisposition, much like those of heart disease, some cancers (like breast cancer in women), arthritis and Alzheimer's.

It is my hope that in my and my daughter's lifetime the genetic factor will be discovered so that we may have a chance of defeating it in coming generations. At the present time it is not only proliferating and becoming more prevalent, but more and more men are getting MS. 25 years ago 2 out of every 3 people with MS were women. Today it is just about 50% each men and women.



====================================
MS study by Andrew Fletcher
====================================

If you are not participating in the Andrew Fletcher study, why not? It is free, involves no drugs, diet or nutritional supplements, does not cost anything, and you have absolutely nothing to lose. We are far enough into the study now to be seeing many positive results. If you are not participating, here is how you get started.

Send an e-mail to: Andrew Fletcher mailto:Gravity@currantbun.com and ask for specifics of the program. Andrew will e-mail them to you. Then you simply raise the head of your bed six inches higher than the foot, and send simple e-mail reports to Andrew from time to time reporting what changes you experience. Some have minor discomforts the first few days, but most do not report any discomfort at all. An immediate positive result is not having to get up several times each night. Most sleep all through the night, or just get up one time.

There is also a message board where you may read the results and comments of others. All of us need to use the message board to report our results from time to time so others can benefit from our experience. You may post anonymously if you prefer.

INCLINED TO SLEEP INCLINED message board:



I had my daughter immediately raise the head of her bed when she learned she has MS last week, and she had an immediate reduction in the severity of the numbness and tingling in her legs and feet. She reported that to her neurologist and he said there is much scientific evidence to indicate that the human body is designed to function vertically and not horizontally. He said he is recommending inclined sleep for all his patients.

I know that hundreds of subscribers to this newsletter are not participating in this study. I must repeat, if you are not sleeping inclined, why not? If you are participating and not sending in regular reports to Andrew, please do so. We can only get the attention of the allopathic medical world by having well-documented data. Please send Andrew your reports at the suggested intervals, even if you just write him two or three sentences. Every little bit helps.
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Postby AndrewKFletcher » Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:24 am

Information, photographs and Poll relating to Chronic Venous Insufficiency, Varicose veins and ms reports from people trying Inclined Therapy.http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-6755.html


More reports from people trying the Inclined Bed Method for MS.
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-8535.html
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Inclined Bed Therapy Progress Tracking Journals

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:53 am

A New Inclined Bed Therapy tracking forum has been set up to combine all the posts from people using IBT for ms and CCSVI in order to make it easier for people to follow.

If you are using IBT or going to use it then please add your updates to your journal on my website in addition to posting your improvements on thisisms.


http://www.inclinedbedtherapy.com

Andrew
Find us on Facebook.com/InclinedBedTherapy
IBT website: http://inclinedbedtherapy.com
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