FLAVONOIDS - some protect neurons/myelin

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FLAVONOIDS - some protect neurons/myelin

Postby jackD » Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:48 pm

I have been looking into FLAVONOIDS for some time and these two new Oct 2009 article/abstract on Luteolin has caused me to review my past research.

I have done LOTS of research on this stuff. I have found one GOOD Luteolin product, LUTIMAX, but it proved to be too expensive for me to continue taking it. I have talked by phone with the folks at LUTIMAX about the research being done on Luteolin. They have provided me with some of full text articles below.
.
http://lifeextensionvitamins.stores.yah ... lufo1.html
.
J Neuroinflammation. 2009 Oct 13;6:29.

Luteolin as a therapeutic option for multiple sclerosis.
Theoharides TC.

Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. theoharis.theoharides@tufts.edu

Multiple sclerosis (MS) remains without an effective treatment in spite of intense research efforts. Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) reduces duration and severity of symptoms in many relapsing-remitting MS patients, but its mechanism of action is still not well understood. Moreover, IFN-beta and other available treatments must be given parenterally and have a variety of adverse effects.

Certain naturally occurring flavonoids, such as luteolin, have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, including inhibition of activated peripheral blood leukocytes from MS patients.

Luteolin also inhibits mast cells, as well as mast cell-dependent T cell activation, recently implicated in MS pathogenesis.

Moreover, luteolin and structurally similar flavonoids can inhibit experimental allergic allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS in rodents.

An appropriate luteolin formulation that permits sufficient absorption and reduces its metabolism could be a useful adjuvant to IFN-beta for MS therapy.

PMID: 19825165 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

J Neuroinflammation. 2009 Oct 13;6:28.

Immunomodulatory responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis patients upon in vitro incubation with the flavonoid luteolin: additive effects of IFN-beta.
Sternberg Z, Chadha K, Lieberman A, Drake A, Hojnacki D, Weinstock-Guttman B, Munschauer F.

Department of Neurology, Baird MS Center, Jacobs Neurological Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. zs2@buffalo.edu

The study is aimed to determine the role of luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), alone and in combination with human interferon-beta (IFN-beta), in modulating the immune response(s) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

PBMC proliferation in the presence or absence of these drugs was determined and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha), and the ratio of cell migration mediator MMP-9, and its inhibitor, TIMP-1 was assessed in the culture supernatants.

Luteolin reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of PBMCs, and modulated the levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha released by PBMCs in the culture supernatants.

Luteolin reduced the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio via lowering MMP-9 production.

In the majority of cases, luteolin, when combined with IFN-beta, had additive effects in modulating cell proliferation, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, MMP-9 and TIMP-1.

PMID: 19825164 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Here are some GOOD FULL TEXT on FLAVONOIDS that I have found.

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/Flavonoids%20MS.pdf

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/Lute ... JPET01.pdf

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/OxStress-03.pdf

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/OxStress-01.pdf

I take lots of flavonoid supplements and eat lots of berries/fruits.

I cannot evaluate the VALUE of all this. I just "do-it" because it makes so much sense based upon these studies.

Only certain flavonoids with certain structures seem to help.

Here is the FDA database of selected foods from 2003 if you want to get some from your diet.

http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/flav.pdf


jackD
Last edited by jackD on Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Flavonoids

Postby NHE » Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:44 am

Rooibos tea contains luteolin.

Health Notes wrote:Active constituents
Rooibos is completely caffeine free and, unlike black tea (Camellia sinensis), does not contain tannins that may interfere with iron absorption. Rooibos is rich in flavonoids, polyphenols, and phenolic acids (including aspalathin, (+)-catechin, isoquercitrin, luteolin, quercetin, rutin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and vanillic acid). The polyphenol aspalathin is unique to rooibos. The plant also contains oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and a variety of minerals, though at levels that are of questionable clinical relevance.1

Preliminary studies show that rooibos has antimutagenic and antioxidant properties.2 3 4 5 It has also shown some ability to prevent radiation damage in animals.6 7 8 This research somewhat supports rooibos’s traditional use to slow the aging process, and its modern use as a cancer preventative. Laboratory and animal studies indicate that it affects antibody production and has anti-HIV activity.9 10 11 These studies raise the possibility that the herb could be useful in aiding deficient immune responses in allergies, AIDS, and infections. No clinical trials have yet been published on this herb, however, so its efficacy is still unknown.


However, I have yet to come to a conclusion as to whether or not consuming rooibos is compatible with treating MS. At least one paper found that it increased IL-2 and recommended rooibos for Th1 deficient conditions. Note that several of the crabs promote a shift from Th1 to Th2 so this may make rooibos counterintuitive for MS.

The full text of the following journal article is available for free...

Effects of Rooibos Tea Extract on Antigen-specific Antibody Production and Cytokine Generation in Vitro and in Vivo.
Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2001 Oct;65(10):2137-45.

    Rooibos tea contains a large amount of flavonoids and acts as a potent antioxidant. In this study, we examined the effects of Rooibos tea extract on antigen-specific antibody production and cytokine generation in vitro and in vivo. The primary in vitro anti-ovalbumin (anti-OVA) or sheep red blood cell (SRBC) antibody production in murine splenocytes was markedly stimulated by the addition of the tea extract at concentrations of 1-100 microg/ml. On the other hand, a nonspecific antibody response elicited with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in purified splenic B-cells was not modified by the extract. Rooibos tea extract caused an increase in the generation of interleukin 2 (IL-2) both in OVA- and anti-CD3-primed splenocytes at concentrations ranging from 10 microg/ml to 1000 microg/ml. In contrast, this tea extract suppressed the generation of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in OVA-primed splenocytes. Moreover, the reduction of OVA-induced antibody production in serum of the cyclosporin A (CyA) -treated rats can be significantly restored and the IL-2 generation in murine splenocytes was stimulated, following oral administrations of Rooibos tea extract. Thus, our findings suggested that Rooibos tea extract may facilitate the antigen-specific antibody production through selective augmentation of IL-2 generation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, Rooibos tea intake may be of value in prophylaxis of the diseases involving a severe defect in Th1 immune response such as cancer, allergy, AIDS, and other infections.

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Last edited by NHE on Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jackD » Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:32 am

This South Africian bush tea (Rooibos tea) may contain luteolin but it seems to contain a lot of other things - mostly unknown.

I would not recommend it as one's source of luteolin.

I have had some very terrible experiences with teas other than the standard green/white/black teas.

One South Amercian Tea actually caused me to have a major loss in vision. I had an "auroa" that lasted for about 20 min.

It took be about a month to finally discover that the tea was a "health drink tea" that caused the body to produce Gamma Interferon.

Increasing Gamma Interferon is VERY BAD for MS folks. My wife was taking this tea because it increased her immune system and helped her with her medical condition.

It is the flavonoids in green/white tea that have been proven to help folks with MS.

About two months later I had another cup of that tea and lost my vision again.

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Postby shye » Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:47 am

wow--thanks again JackD
this is great info--have't finished reading it all, but definitely upping my celery, beet, carrot etc juicing!!
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Re: Flavonoids

Postby NHE » Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:18 pm

Hi Jack,

jackD wrote:This South Africian bush tea (Rooibos tea) may contain luteolin but it seems to contain a lot of other things - mostly unknown.

I would not recommend it as one's source of luteolin.


Here's a paper which discusses the flavonoid content of rooibos. Luteolin is one of the minor components.

Unfermented Rooibos Tea: Quantitative Characterization of Flavonoids by HPLC-UV and Determination of the Total Antioxidant Activity
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Dec 3;51(25):7472-4.
    Unfermented rooibos originates from the leaves and the stems of the indigenous South African plant, Aspalathus linearis, and it has been reported to have a higher content of flavonoids compared to that of fermented rooibos. The HPLC/UV method developed in our laboratory for the analysis of the fermented rooibos was applied to the quantitative characterization of the major flavonoids present in the unfermented rooibos. Main compounds determined were aspalathin (49.92 (± 0.80 mg/g), isoorientin (3.57 (± 0.18 mg/g), orientin (2.336 (± 0.049 mg/g), and rutin (1.69 (± 0.14 mg/g), followed in order by isovitexin, vitexin, isoquercitrin and hyperoside, quercetin, luteolin and chrysoeryol. The identity of detected flavonoids was confirmed by comparing their retention times and UV spectra with those of corresponding standards. The total antioxidant activity (TAA) of the tea infusions was measured by the ABTS*+ radical cation decolorization assay. The TAA of unfermented rooibos (0.8 Trolox meq/g) resulted 2-fold higher than that of the fermented rooibos. When compared with different water infusions of Camellia sinensis (green and black tea), this TAA value was about 50% lower.

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Postby jackD » Thu Feb 18, 2010 12:42 am

The best thing about Rooibos Tea is that it increases interleukin-10. The flavonoid value is minor.

jackD

Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2007 Feb;71(2):598-602. Epub 2007 Feb 7.

Augmentation of antigen-specific antibody production and IL-10 generation with a fraction from Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) tea.

Ichiyama K, Tai A, Yamamoto I.

Department of Immunochemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan.

Rooibos tea was extracted with boiling water. The aqueous extract was chromatographed in a Diaion HP20 column eluted stepwise with water, 25%, 50% and 75% (v/v) aqueous methanol, and 100% methanol. The water eluate (fraction A) showed an augmenting effect on anti-ovalbumin (anti-OVA) immunoglobulin M (IgM) production in OVA-stimulated murine splenocytes in vitro. Fraction A also showed a strong augmenting effect on interleukin-10 generation in murine splenocytes. Furthermore, continuous ingestion of fraction A was found to increase the anti-OVA IgM level in the sera of OVA-immunized mice.

PMID: 17284834 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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should increase Lutimax sales

Postby jackD » Sat Apr 17, 2010 8:05 pm

This should increase Lutimax sales.

jackD

J Neuroinflammation. 2009 Oct 13;6:29.

Luteolin as a therapeutic option for multiple sclerosis.
Theoharides TC.

Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. theoharis.theoharides@tufts.edu

Multiple sclerosis (MS) remains without an effective treatment in spite of intense research efforts. Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) reduces duration and severity of symptoms in many relapsing-remitting MS patients, but its mechanism of action is still not well understood. Moreover, IFN-beta and other available treatments must be given parenterally and have a variety of adverse effects.

Certain naturally occurring flavonoids, such as luteolin, have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, including inhibition of activated peripheral blood leukocytes from MS patients.

Luteolin also inhibits mast cells, as well as mast cell-dependent T cell activation, recently implicated in MS pathogenesis.

Moreover, luteolin and structurally similar flavonoids can inhibit experimental allergic allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS in rodents.

An appropriate luteolin formulation that permits sufficient absorption and reduces its metabolism could be a useful adjuvant to IFN-beta for MS therapy.

PMID: 19825165 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Postby MSBOB » Sun Apr 24, 2011 6:13 pm

I have been checking out Luteolin recently and came to this post. I think that the following would be interesting to anyone interested in knowing more about polyphenols/flavanoids etc.

From:

http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/conte ... 4-6-28.pdf

"The immunomodulatory effects of luteolin at these low concentrations are especially encouraging since these fall in the realm of plasma concentrations of approximately 1.5 μM observed with supplementation of 1 g/day flavonoids [25]."

And

"Human ingestion of bolus dose of 50 mg luteolin has been shown to lead to a peak plasma concentration of 0.05 μmol (total luteolin and its metabolites) after 2 h [60]. This plasma level is similar to the concentration of luteolin aglycone which showed biological activities in our in vitro study. Assuming that a percentage of ingested luteolin could be found in the plasma in the form of aglycone [61], combined with the likelihood of luteolin deglucuronidation during inflammatory processes [62], suggest that luteolin supplementation may lead to its accumulation in tissues [63] such as blood, raising its concentrations to the realm of plasma levels with therapeutic implication in patients with chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as MS"

What a great thing that is. This is not new, but the science is getting stronger that luteolin is a very effective treatment option, at least supplementary to other treatments.

http://immunobiotics.com/pdf/ms/Flavono ... %20877.pdf
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Postby MSBOB » Sun Apr 24, 2011 8:27 pm

I lost my buzz on luteolin. It is too expensive to be able to get the types of effects noted in the articles.

I will stick to chamomile tea and artichokes, or make my own luteolin.
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Postby ikulo » Tue May 03, 2011 5:21 pm

MSBOB - try eating dandelions. You can buy them at whole foods, or your local farmers market. It's supposed to be a good source of luteolin, though I can't find info on how much exactly.

I usually throw some dandelions, kale, and mango into a good blender and make a smoothie. Good stuff!
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