all things vitamin D

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:26 pm

personally, i wash with soap. i get sun without sunscreen when i can, when there's a point. i eat fish. i have fortified milk in my tea. i take d3 supplements. my levels are great!

here's an interesting little abstract, good old holick chimes in here :)

An Evaluation of the Vitamin D3 Content in Fish: Is the Vitamin D Content Adequate to Satisfy the Dietary Requirement for Vitamin D?
Z. Lu, T.C. Chen, A. Zhang, K.S. Persons, N. Kohn, R. Berkowitz,* S. Martinello,* and M.F. Holick
It has been suggested that the major source of vitamin D should come from dietary sources and not sun exposure. However, the major fortified dietary source of vitamin D is milk which often doesn’t contain at least 80% of what is stated on the label. Fish has been touted as an excellent source of vitamin D especially oily fish including salmon and mackerel. Little is known about the effect of various cooking conditions on the vitamin D content in fish. We initiated a study and evaluated the vitamin D content in several species of fish and also evaluated the effect of baking and frying on the vitamin D content. Surprisingly, farmed salmon had approximately 25% of the vitamin D content as wild salmon had. The vitamin D content in fish varied widely even within species. These data suggest that the tables that list the vitamin D content are out-of-date and need to be re-evaluated.
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Low Vitamin D Levels are Associated With Greater Risk of Rel

Postby Jorge » Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:52 pm

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/01/prweb3485694.htm

Low vitamin D blood levels are associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse attacks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who develop the disease during childhood, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

(Vocus/PRWEB ) January 20, 2010 -- Low vitamin D blood levels are associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse attacks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who develop the disease during childhood, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

“We have known for some time that vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for developing MS, but this is the first study to assess whether vitamin D levels influence the disease course of those who already have MS,” said lead author Ellen Mowry, MD, MCR, a clinical instructor of neurology at the UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center.

The study, which is now published online by the “Annals of Neurology” and is available at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 1/abstract, demonstrates that an increase in vitamin D levels by 10 nanograms per milliliter of blood (ng/mL) corresponds with a 34 percent decrease in the rate of subsequent relapses.

In other words, raising the vitamin D level of a person with MS by 15 ng/mL, which requires about 2,000 international units of vitamin D supplementation a day, could theoretically cut a patient’s relapse rate in half, explained Mowry.

“Although we do not yet know if vitamin D supplementation will be beneficial for MS patients, the fact that there is a clear association between vitamin D levels and relapse rate provides strong rationale for conducting a clinical trial to measure the potential impact of supplementation,” she said.

“This is an exciting finding because it indicates that it is very possible for vitamin D supplementation to have a profound impact on the course of this disease,” said senior author Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD, an associate professor of neurology at UCSF and director of the Regional Pediatric MS Center at UCSF Children’s Hospital. Waubant said she expects similar findings in adult patients with MS.

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and often disabling disease that affects the central nervous system, which comprises the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. A type of autoimmune disorder, MS causes the body’s own defense system to break down a substance called myelin, which surrounds and protects nerve fibers.

Although MS occurs most commonly in adults, a small proportion of cases are diagnosed in children and adolescents. According to the National MS Society, two to five percent of all people with MS experience their first symptoms before the age of 18.

The researchers measured vitamin D levels through blood samples from 110 patients whose MS symptoms began at age 18 or younger. The patients were seen at either UCSF Children’s Hospital or the State University of New York Stony Brook’s Regional Pediatric MS Center of Excellence – two of six multidisciplinary referral centers in the United States sponsored by the National MS Society.

After providing the initial blood sample, patients were followed for an average of 1.7 years, during which the researchers recorded the total number of relapses each patient experienced. According to Mowry, a relapse or flare-up of MS causes new neurologic symptoms or the worsening of old ones, such as impaired vision, problems with balance, or numbness. Relapses can be very mild or severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to function.

During the follow-up period, the researchers assessed the patients’ relapse rates and vitamin D levels after controlling for such factors as age, gender, race, ethnicity, use of MS treatments and the duration of follow-up care.

“If we are able to confirm that vitamin D supplementation is an effective treatment, my hope is that it will help improve the quality of life for all MS patients,” Mowry said.

In addition to a randomized clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation in MS patients, Mowry said further studies are also needed to determine the mechanism by which vitamin D affects inflammatory processes and, in turn, eases symptoms of MS.

Additional co-authors from UCSF include Dorothee Chabas, MD, PhD; Jonathan Strober, MD; Jamie McDonald, BS; Jorge Oksenberg, PhD, and Peter Bacchetti, PhD. Co-authors from other institutions are Lauren Krupp, MD; Maria Milazzo, MS, CPNP, and Anita Belman, MD, all of the Pediatric MS Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook.

The study was supported by a National MS Society Sylvia Lawry Fellowship Award and an additional grant from the National MS Society.

UCSF Children’s Hospital creates an environment where children and their families find compassionate care at the forefront of scientific discovery, with more than 150 experts in 50 medical specialties serving patients throughout Northern California and beyond. The hospital admits about 5,000 children each year, including 2,000 babies born in the hospital. For more information, visit www.ucsfchildrenshospital.org.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care. For further information, visit www.ucsf.edu.

Corinna Kaarlela, News Director
Source: Kate Vidinsky (415) 476-2557
Web: www.ucsf.edu
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Vitamin D 'triggers and arms' the immune system

Postby MSUK » Mon Mar 08, 2010 3:17 am

Image

The so-called sunshine vitamin, which can be obtained from food or manufactured by human skin exposed to the sun, plays a key role in boosting the immune system, researchers believe.

In particular it triggers and arms the body's T cells, the cells in the body that seek out and destroy any invading bacteria and viruses.

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have discovered that Vitamin D is crucial to activating our immune defences and that without sufficient intake of the vitamin, the killer cells of the immune system – T cells – will not be able to react to and fight off serious infections in the body...........................

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... ageid=1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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Postby tzootsi » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:49 am

To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?
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Postby L » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:41 pm

tzootsi wrote:To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?


Vitamin D3 also alters the bodies respons to the Epstein Barr Virus. It down-regulates (is that the correct phrase?) the way in which T cells react to EBV. EBV is a prerequisite of having MS. The virus is reported as being much more active during an MS relapse and viral activity seems to play a role in triggering MS disease activity.
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:43 pm

There is a significant body of knowledge that links MS and bacterial infection.
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Postby mose » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:58 pm

tzootsi wrote:To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?


it may be that the autoimmune hypothesis is not correct. The more we learn, the more we realize we do not know.
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:12 pm

......or it may be one of several correct ideas.
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Re: Vitamin D 'triggers and arms' the immune system

Postby NHE » Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:48 pm

Here's a link to a good review paper on vitamin D. The full paper is available for free. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15951480

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My doctor's thoughts on vitamin D

Postby Apuman » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:07 pm

First, I should state that this in not coming from my nero (namely because I don't have one :wink: ) The doctor who's been treating me is both an MD and a naturopath and has beem most helpful in giving me good advice in regards to my MS. He's very big on vitamin D, not just for MS patients.

The latest news he gave me was regarding a study, where pwMS were given high daily doses of D, around 70,000 units. Through MRI scans, they found that lesions were actually shrinking! I wish I could point you to the study, but appearantly, it has yet to be released. I just wanted to share this exciting bit of info.

He also strongly advocates getting plenty of sun, as the body of a white person can produce 25,000 untis simple by spending a half hour in the sun. Another advantage to this is that the body knows how to essentially shut off vitamin D production before it starts reaching toxic levels. Of course, always take care not to get sunburned!
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Postby tara97 » Sat Mar 13, 2010 9:01 pm

yes it turns out that vitamin D is a hormone. I had the worse time trying to figure out what it was because everyone was calling it something different. it is a very very important hormone . it is not a vitamin because we can make it ourselves. weird how we call paying attention to nutrition homeopathic and regular medicine that is really the thing that is killing us is the main stream. also I think there are things like the cortisol/insulin relationship for example. too much insulin not enough cortisol= hypoglycemia at least that is what is happening to me. also there is that silly mistep in heme sythesis and all that entails. hey without D, calcium, magnesium where does that leave us. I wonder how manythings get ignored after the major granddaddy of diagnosises is made. congradulations, you have MS now every health problem you have from here on in will be blamed on this. keep in mind that I have had almost every symptoms that you all have yet I have only had one central scar that actually later disappeared.
Last edited by tara97 on Wed Aug 25, 2010 11:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: My doctor's thoughts on vitamin D

Postby L » Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:00 am

Apuman wrote:high daily doses of D, around 70,000 units.


That's fascinating. I am looking forwards to the publication. Thanks!
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Postby L » Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:35 am

Do you know any other details, the size of the study, it's location?
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Postby Apuman » Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:07 pm

Sorry, I'm afraid not. So far, I havn't found anything searching the internet. I'll ask my doctor more about it next time I see him.
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Postby L » Mon Mar 15, 2010 11:57 am

Thanks
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