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Vitamin D curiously low

Postby Merlyn » Wed Dec 30, 2009 5:23 pm

I started to spend a lot of time in the sun after getting on the right thyroid medication. Prior to that, I could not tolerate even tiny amounts of sunshine, I would just collapse. So since being on T3, I can suntan and do so. So a couple of years ago, after turning dark dark brown, I had my vitamin D3 level tested, which came back like 25 (reference range 15-145, although don't quote me on these numbers). I was barely above reference range... I remember being totally puzzled by this, and I am wondering if it could be related to too much iron... anybody else test their vitamin D3 and find it to be alarmingly low?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3838288
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Postby SaintLouis » Wed Dec 30, 2009 5:51 pm

In October my D level was 21 and so I've been on 50000IU every week since to try and bring it up. Oddly my iron stores are alarmingly low as well and doc wants me to have IV iron. Of course I'm terrified to agree to that at this point.
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Postby cheerleader » Wed Dec 30, 2009 11:34 pm

new study on vitamin D in fair skinned women in UK...could low serum D levels be linked to your genetics-regardless of D intake?

Further research is required to explore potential genetic links between low vitamin D levels and pigmentation. Polymorphisms in the vitamin D binding protein and vitamin D hydroxylase ( CYP2R1) genes influence vitamin D levels although vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotypes have not been consistently linked to vitamin D levels in healthy individuals [25]. In prostate cancer patients, the Fok1 ff VDR polymorphism when associated with low plasma vitamin D levels conferred the highest risk of prostate cancer in the USA as well as giving rise to more aggressive tumours [26]. The anti-proliferative and differentiation effects of vitamin D on many cell types have long been known with therapeutic targets such as psoriasis and cancer but the effects of vitamin D are very complex with the involvement of many pathways in the cell cycle [27]. It is becoming apparent that skin pigmentation via the MSH pathway is involved in cell survival and proliferation as well as inflammation so it is possible that pigmentation genes and genes involved in vitamin D metabolism may be linked [28].


link to study

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Postby Johnson » Thu Dec 31, 2009 12:19 am

new study on vitamin D in fair skinned women in UK...could low serum D levels be linked to your genetics-regardless of D intake?


Great... Other than the "bronzing" of a typical hemachromatosis type, I am fair skinned Celtic-type, as is my mother - who was born in the UK. I'm doomed. Dagnabit.

Nice find cheerleader.
My name is not really Johnson. MSed up since 1993
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Dec 31, 2009 5:06 am

hi there, first off i will say this is not a topic for the CCSVI forum.

until i figure out how to move it to the 'natural approach' forum, i'll answer here:

perhaps try increasing your supplemental d3 intake, merlyn. sunshine doesn't necessarily give you everything you need for d3. especially as your skin gets darker. pigmentation (also age) interferes with d3 generation in the skin.

when you sit out in the sun or take dietary/supplemental d3 (cholecalciferol) the first thing that happens after formation in the skin, is a hydroxylation (primarily) in the liver.

after that it is the metabolite 25 hydroxyvitamin d3. that is the level that is tested to determine your body's stores. the units for this test (SI) are nmol/L.

the next thing that happens is another hydroxylation mainly in the kidneys. after this stage vitamin d3 becomes the powerful anti-inflammatory steroid hormone 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin d3. the units for this test (SI) are pmol/L.

i am female, with UK parents. i have been successful using diet and supplements, to get my d3 (the 25 hydroxy one) up over 100 nmol/l.

on the high doses i took initially, i have had it as high as 149 without doing anything for my liver.

my first booster regimen was starting from 72, after months of supplementing at between 3000-4000 IU per day. i called the hospital and they told me a regimen designed to get patients boosted 50 nmol/l in a short time. the regimen is 50,000IU/d x 10 days. that got me up to 149.

when i stop taking high dose d3 it settles back down below 100.

over the last year or so, i have been looking into the connection between the liver and low uric acid and zinc in ms patients. incidentally i noticed that after correcting my zinc deficiency, not only did my uric acid normalize, but my d3 absorption seemed to skyrocket.

zinc supplementation apparently fixed my uric acid level by providing my liver with the tools it needed to properly complete the urea cycle.

around the same time i was investigating zinc uric acid and the liver, i realized my d3 was down to 103. this was after taking 25,000IU d3 per week through the winter. i did a shorter, 8 day regimen at 50,000 IU per day.

the result: 271 nmol/L d3!!!

i had to stop supplementing altogether to get it back down under 250.

so bottom line, there are ways to get your levels up, you do not have to rely on sunshine alone... the inuit don't!
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Postby shye » Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:07 pm

Merlyn,once you are tanned, you absorb less or no Vit D from the sun.

after about 10 years of taking 800 IU of D daily, Iwas tested deficient (below 21 ng/mL)--my iron was all okay--took about 2 1/2 years of high dose (10-15,000 IU) to bring up to 58 (tested at end of summer) so the next 2 months continued with an average of about 7,000 IU daily, and then recent test only 44 ng/mL ! not much sun in past few months (whereas had been in sun in the summer just before previous test).
So, I definitely do absorb from the sun, but even with sun need supplement--and without sun, need to supplement much more. And my iron is still okay

(am fair, celtic somewhere on father's side)
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soap minimises vitamin D absorption?

Postby hwebb » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:45 pm

Hi there,
I've been reading in a number of places that soap inhibits vitamin D absorption from the skin. The most recent place I read this was in a vegetarian lifestyle magazine, but there's mention of this all over the net also. The theory goes that vitamin D is fat-soluble, and soap contains substantial fat...so when you start forming vitamin D in your skin it may osmotically transfer to the soap...rather than seep into your blood stream. So apparently you're meant to wash your skin with water only...and it takes 48 hrs for maximum vitamin D absorption.
Does anyone have any experience with this (gone for a soap-free period to see if their vitamin D levels are improved) ?
I had a soap-free shower today - and must say I feel pretty clean!
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:26 pm

personally, i wash with soap. i get sun without sunscreen when i can, when there's a point. i eat fish. i have fortified milk in my tea. i take d3 supplements. my levels are great!

here's an interesting little abstract, good old holick chimes in here :)

An Evaluation of the Vitamin D3 Content in Fish: Is the Vitamin D Content Adequate to Satisfy the Dietary Requirement for Vitamin D?
Z. Lu, T.C. Chen, A. Zhang, K.S. Persons, N. Kohn, R. Berkowitz,* S. Martinello,* and M.F. Holick
It has been suggested that the major source of vitamin D should come from dietary sources and not sun exposure. However, the major fortified dietary source of vitamin D is milk which often doesn’t contain at least 80% of what is stated on the label. Fish has been touted as an excellent source of vitamin D especially oily fish including salmon and mackerel. Little is known about the effect of various cooking conditions on the vitamin D content in fish. We initiated a study and evaluated the vitamin D content in several species of fish and also evaluated the effect of baking and frying on the vitamin D content. Surprisingly, farmed salmon had approximately 25% of the vitamin D content as wild salmon had. The vitamin D content in fish varied widely even within species. These data suggest that the tables that list the vitamin D content are out-of-date and need to be re-evaluated.
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Low Vitamin D Levels are Associated With Greater Risk of Rel

Postby Jorge » Wed Jan 20, 2010 6:52 pm

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/01/prweb3485694.htm

Low vitamin D blood levels are associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse attacks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who develop the disease during childhood, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

(Vocus/PRWEB ) January 20, 2010 -- Low vitamin D blood levels are associated with a significantly higher risk of relapse attacks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who develop the disease during childhood, according to a study conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco.

“We have known for some time that vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for developing MS, but this is the first study to assess whether vitamin D levels influence the disease course of those who already have MS,” said lead author Ellen Mowry, MD, MCR, a clinical instructor of neurology at the UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center.

The study, which is now published online by the “Annals of Neurology” and is available at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour ... 1/abstract, demonstrates that an increase in vitamin D levels by 10 nanograms per milliliter of blood (ng/mL) corresponds with a 34 percent decrease in the rate of subsequent relapses.

In other words, raising the vitamin D level of a person with MS by 15 ng/mL, which requires about 2,000 international units of vitamin D supplementation a day, could theoretically cut a patient’s relapse rate in half, explained Mowry.

“Although we do not yet know if vitamin D supplementation will be beneficial for MS patients, the fact that there is a clear association between vitamin D levels and relapse rate provides strong rationale for conducting a clinical trial to measure the potential impact of supplementation,” she said.

“This is an exciting finding because it indicates that it is very possible for vitamin D supplementation to have a profound impact on the course of this disease,” said senior author Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, PhD, an associate professor of neurology at UCSF and director of the Regional Pediatric MS Center at UCSF Children’s Hospital. Waubant said she expects similar findings in adult patients with MS.

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and often disabling disease that affects the central nervous system, which comprises the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. A type of autoimmune disorder, MS causes the body’s own defense system to break down a substance called myelin, which surrounds and protects nerve fibers.

Although MS occurs most commonly in adults, a small proportion of cases are diagnosed in children and adolescents. According to the National MS Society, two to five percent of all people with MS experience their first symptoms before the age of 18.

The researchers measured vitamin D levels through blood samples from 110 patients whose MS symptoms began at age 18 or younger. The patients were seen at either UCSF Children’s Hospital or the State University of New York Stony Brook’s Regional Pediatric MS Center of Excellence – two of six multidisciplinary referral centers in the United States sponsored by the National MS Society.

After providing the initial blood sample, patients were followed for an average of 1.7 years, during which the researchers recorded the total number of relapses each patient experienced. According to Mowry, a relapse or flare-up of MS causes new neurologic symptoms or the worsening of old ones, such as impaired vision, problems with balance, or numbness. Relapses can be very mild or severe enough to interfere with a person’s ability to function.

During the follow-up period, the researchers assessed the patients’ relapse rates and vitamin D levels after controlling for such factors as age, gender, race, ethnicity, use of MS treatments and the duration of follow-up care.

“If we are able to confirm that vitamin D supplementation is an effective treatment, my hope is that it will help improve the quality of life for all MS patients,” Mowry said.

In addition to a randomized clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation in MS patients, Mowry said further studies are also needed to determine the mechanism by which vitamin D affects inflammatory processes and, in turn, eases symptoms of MS.

Additional co-authors from UCSF include Dorothee Chabas, MD, PhD; Jonathan Strober, MD; Jamie McDonald, BS; Jorge Oksenberg, PhD, and Peter Bacchetti, PhD. Co-authors from other institutions are Lauren Krupp, MD; Maria Milazzo, MS, CPNP, and Anita Belman, MD, all of the Pediatric MS Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook.

The study was supported by a National MS Society Sylvia Lawry Fellowship Award and an additional grant from the National MS Society.

UCSF Children’s Hospital creates an environment where children and their families find compassionate care at the forefront of scientific discovery, with more than 150 experts in 50 medical specialties serving patients throughout Northern California and beyond. The hospital admits about 5,000 children each year, including 2,000 babies born in the hospital. For more information, visit www.ucsfchildrenshospital.org.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care. For further information, visit www.ucsf.edu.

Corinna Kaarlela, News Director
Source: Kate Vidinsky (415) 476-2557
Web: www.ucsf.edu
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Vitamin D 'triggers and arms' the immune system

Postby MSUK » Mon Mar 08, 2010 3:17 am

Image

The so-called sunshine vitamin, which can be obtained from food or manufactured by human skin exposed to the sun, plays a key role in boosting the immune system, researchers believe.

In particular it triggers and arms the body's T cells, the cells in the body that seek out and destroy any invading bacteria and viruses.

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have discovered that Vitamin D is crucial to activating our immune defences and that without sufficient intake of the vitamin, the killer cells of the immune system – T cells – will not be able to react to and fight off serious infections in the body...........................

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... ageid=1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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Postby tzootsi » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:49 am

To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?
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Postby L » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:41 pm

tzootsi wrote:To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?


Vitamin D3 also alters the bodies respons to the Epstein Barr Virus. It down-regulates (is that the correct phrase?) the way in which T cells react to EBV. EBV is a prerequisite of having MS. The virus is reported as being much more active during an MS relapse and viral activity seems to play a role in triggering MS disease activity.
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:43 pm

There is a significant body of knowledge that links MS and bacterial infection.
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Postby mose » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:58 pm

tzootsi wrote:To me, this deepens the whole MS to immune system mystery. Do we want to stimulate or dampen the immune system? Both vitamin D and LDN appear to strengthen the immune system - why then do they seem to be beneficial to people with MS?


it may be that the autoimmune hypothesis is not correct. The more we learn, the more we realize we do not know.
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Mon Mar 08, 2010 7:12 pm

......or it may be one of several correct ideas.
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