all things vitamin D

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby msgator » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:52 pm

seems to me like the most important time to take Vit. D is while you are pregnant as most prenatals contain either the 400IU or less dose. Although I guess there is some research that says that it slows the diagnosis, if CCSVI is a congenital anomaly by the time we arrive it is too late to correct the problem of missing veins.

jimmylegs, please correct me if I am wrong.

Ann
always look on the bright side of life

Veins opened 10/15/10. RIJV still on the small side. Feeling much better.
User avatar
msgator
Family Elder
 
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:00 pm
Location: USA

Advertisement

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jun 26, 2010 3:07 pm

i would say that everyone probably needs to take it in all the time. with a few exceptions such as the young and pale at the nudist colony. hyperbole? yes.

but still. the amount for each person should be tailored to each individual, based on knowing blood levels and targets.

if i got pregnant i would get a regular test of my D3 level to ensure that my status quo regimen was still keeping my level at the very least above 100nmol/L. if it started to drop below then i would increase my intake.
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby JenniferF » Sat Jul 03, 2010 9:06 pm

I send my kids to play outside. All year round, many hours. They are homeschooled, so they can get a lot of hours in the sun.

Beyond that, just a standard multivitamin, 400 iu I think, probably 60% of the time on average. (Depends on the spouse remember to put vitamins out before he goes to work.)

That's what we do. Not proposing it based on anything other than my hunch about what is good for my particular kids. I could be wrong.

Jen.
User avatar
JenniferF
Family Member
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 3:00 pm

Vitamin D

Postby Hummer » Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:57 am

I am on 4000 IU per day

Brad
User avatar
Hummer
Newbie
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 3:00 pm
Location: Kelowna BC Canada

Postby Absentee » Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:16 pm

my daughters pediatrician recommended one of the kids D drops per day. That is 400 IU. This was after informing him of my condition (MS) and expressing our intent to supplement our babies diet with more D.

As context, I am RRMS and we live in New England.
User avatar
Absentee
Family Member
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2009 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:26 pm

i just checked health canada dri tables for vit d3.

AI stands for Adequate Intake (in the absence of sufficient sunlight).
UL is the Upper Limit for daily intakes.

The table shows 2000 IU per day is the upper limit for about everyone, except infants up to one year. for them the upper limit is 1000.

personally it seems 4000 IU is more the thing for daily maintenance. that's from all sources of course, sun food and supps. i haven't linked to the supporting research here, but it's all available somewhere in a past post or ten, here at TIMS!

at the end of the day it looks like if your kids are older than 12 months the recommendation is the same as for everyone else - up to age 50 at least.

Vitamin D
Unit μg/day IU/day
AI UL AI UL
Infants
0-6 mo 5* 25 200* 1000
7-12 mo 5* 25 200* 1000
Children
1-3 y 5* 50 200* 2000
4-8 y 5* 50 200* 2000
Males
9-13 y 5* 50 200* 2000
14-18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
51-70 y 10* 50 400* 2000
>70 y 15* 50 600* 2000
Females
9-13 y 5* 50 200* 2000
14-18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
51-70 y 10* 50 400* 2000
>70 y 15* 50 600* 2000
Pregnancy
< 18 y 5* 50 200* 2000
19-30 y 5* 50 200* 2000
31-50 y 5* 50 200* 2000
*in the absence of sufficient sunlight

sufficient sunlight is a judgement call, since it depends on where you are on the globe, atmospheric conditions, whether your skin is light or dark, covered or bare, sunscreen used or not, how long you're out, how old you are etc.

different people's bodies absorb supplements with varying efficiency/efficacy so it's hard to know what level will work for an individual.

blood work removes the guessing and tells you easily whether you are getting enough or too much from a given regimen.

HTH!
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 04, 2010 8:28 pm

oh jeez .. formatting.. i am not about to go back and code through all that right now LOL hope you can figure out the columns okay!
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Is hypovitaminosis D a MS environmental risk factor?

Postby MSUK » Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:00 am

Image

The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed.

First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease.

Secondly, the classical physiological notions about vitamin D have recently been challenged and the main new findings are summarized....Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
User avatar
MSUK
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2647
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:00 pm

Postby ppicklee » Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:00 pm

It's funny (spelled ironic) that vitamin D and MS is getting so much attention these days. 10 years ago when I was taking vitamin D my neurologist sent me to a dietitian and blood work because they were so freaked out about the vitamin D. Now my current neurologist (the other one moved away) sent me to do blood work for vitamin D and now they say I'm not taking enough. So I don't think that the consensus is it in.
User avatar
ppicklee
Family Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:12 pm

the pros are finally catching up with the three decades of science that's all.
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby ppicklee » Mon Jul 12, 2010 7:22 pm

You gotta laugh. Sometimes you just smile, nod your head and laugh on the inside.
:-) :-)
User avatar
ppicklee
Family Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:00 pm

New Vitamin D Study

Postby ikulo » Tue Aug 10, 2010 9:12 pm

Ann Neurol. 2010 Aug;68(2):193-203.
Higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with lower relapse risk in multiple sclerosis.

Simpson S Jr, Taylor B, Blizzard L, Ponsonby AL, Pittas F, Tremlett H, Dwyer T, Gies P, van der Mei I.

Menzies Research Institute Private Bag 23 Hobart TAS 7001 Australia.
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: A protective association between higher vitamin D levels and the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been demonstrated; however, its role in modulating MS clinical course has been little studied. We investigated whether higher levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) were associated with a lower risk of relapses in people with MS. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 145 participants with relapsing-remitting MS from 2002 to 2005. Serum 25-OH-D levels were measured biannually, and the hazard of relapse was assessed using survival analysis. RESULTS: There was an inverse linear relationship between 25-OH-D levels and the hazard of relapse over the subsequent 6 months, with hazard ratio (HR) 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85-0.97) per 10nmol/l increase in 25-OH-D level (p = 0.006). When variation due to timing of blood collection was removed by estimating 25-OH-D at the start of each season, this association persisted, with HR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83-0.98) per 10nmol/l increase (p = 0.016). Taking into account the biological half-life of 25-OH-D, we estimated 25-OH-D at monthly intervals, resulting in a slightly enhanced association, with HR 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95) per 10nmol/l increase (p = 0.001). Adjusting for potential confounders did not alter these findings. INTERPRETATION: In this prospective population-based cohort study, in a cohort largely on immunomodulatory therapy, higher 25-OH-D levels were associated with a reduced hazard of relapse. This occurred in a dose-dependent linear fashion, with each 10nmol/l increase in 25-OH-D resulting in up to a 12% reduction in risk of relapse. Clinically, raising 25-OH-D levels by 50nmol/l could halve the hazard of a relapse. ANN NEUROL 2010;68:193-203.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20695012
User avatar
ikulo
Family Elder
 
Posts: 444
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 3:00 pm
Location: colorado

Raising vitamin D level by 50nmol/L could reduce relapses

Postby MSUK » Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:46 pm

Study confirms raising vitamin D level by 50nmol/L could reduce MS relapses by 50%

Image

Higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with lower relapse risk in multiple sclerosis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: A protective association between higher vitamin D levels and the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been demonstrated; however, its role in modulating MS clinical course has been little studied. We investigated whether higher levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D) were associated with a lower risk of relapses in people with MS.
... Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
User avatar
MSUK
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2647
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Aug 11, 2010 9:01 am

in 2006 the mcmaster drug info desk told me the quick way to jump up 50nmol/L is 50,000 IU per day for 10 days.

from experience and discussions i've had, people will react differently to this treatment.

i had been supplementing with calcium and magnesium prior to my 2006 megadose, and i went up by more like 75 nmol/L on this regimen.

it seems that folks with better zinc status would probably go even more than 50nmol/L higher. that's speaking from personal experience ..

megadosing d3 worked very well the first time when i did not know i was zinc deficient..

the second time i had fixed zn deficiency and even though i only megadosed d3 for 8 days, i jumped up 150nmol/L to end up at 273nmol/L (not safe).

i know other TIMS members have had recalcitrant suboptimal d3 levels until they got their cal mag and zinc status sorted out.
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Aug 11, 2010 9:04 am

for more info see additional comment related to this finding, under the 'general discussion' vit d study topic by squiffy2
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9568
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Natural Approach

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service