all things vitamin D

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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jan 18, 2011 5:41 pm

hi shye, as i said, i haven't noticed anything because i have not had any form of testing that would point them out to me.
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Vitamin D metabolites & MS

Postby MSUK » Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:01 am

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Summary: This interesting imaging study recruited 193 patients with MS and aimed to explore the relationship between blood levels of vitamin D metabolites and clinical disability and changes on brain MRI.

The authors found a statistically significant relationship between low levels of Vitamin D metabolites and degree of disability measured using the MS severity scale. A similar trend was found when disability was measured using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), but this did not reach statistical significance. Higher values of the 25(OH)VD(3) to 24, 25(OH)(2)VD(3) ratio were associated with higher MSSS (p=0.041) and lower brain parenchymal fraction (p=0.008)

The authors conclude that Vitamin D metabolites have protective associations with disability and brain atrophy in MS. In particular, they feel the results indicate strong associations for the 24, 25(OH)(2)VD(3) metabolite, which has not been extensively investigated in MS patients.... Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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Postby elliberato » Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:29 pm

too much???who knows what too much really will do? the stinking fda cant decide if it should be 200, 400, 600iu? The docs at cleveland clinic even argue the point. check out their site there is a discussion on this very topic. Vit d2 is associated with kid stones, not d3...rather have high d levels than PML!
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Postby tara97 » Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:38 pm

yes if you have spent too much time with out D like I did, your body will compensate in other ways. my lungs compensated. when your body's pH has adjusted to its absence and you suddenly replace it. or if you have a severe magnesium and possasium deficiency with in the cells and then you replace it, you could throw yourself into alkalosis and your muscles will start to freeze as mine did. your cells could become calcium loaded with out replacing the magnesium first and then potassium will follow. I thank god that my doctor did not give me the usual 50,000 ui pills as 1000 iu every day for one month made my shoulders and neck freeze. so I learned to take D every few days (with strong sun block) and stop for a few days and took magnesium every day. eventually everything balanced again and I can take as much D as I want. in fact I can feel when I need it as my posture starts to suffer . listen to your body it will tell you everything.
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Vitamin D supplements may not contain as much as advertised

Postby patientx » Tue Jan 25, 2011 9:55 am

I recently came across the following poster presentation from last year's ACTRIMS meeting:


Vitamin D3 content in commercially available oral supplements
Christopher P. Eckstein, Veera Bandaru, Norman Haughey, Peter A.
Calabresi Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Background: As the role of vitamin D in the immune system becomes better understood, oral supplementation for vitamin D deficiency is increasingly common in multiple sclerosis (MS) centers with many patients requiring high dose supplementation to reach adequate serum levels. However, given the wide variety of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplements available and limited regulation within the nutritional supplement industry, the true vitamin D3 content of over-the-counter (OTC) supplements is a concern.

Objectives: To determine the vitamin D3 content in various OTC oral vitamin D3 supplements.

Methods: Various OTC vitamin D3 supplements ranging in dose from 400 IU to 10,000 IU were purchased at local and on-line retail pharmacies or nutrition stores. Vitamin D3 was extracted using ethanol extraction, and sample analysis was performed by liquid chromatography triple quadrupole electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (PE Sciex API 3000).

Results: Ten bottles from various brands with labeled doses ranging from 400 IU to 10,000 IU were tested. The mean cholecalciferol content among all samples was 33.5% of the labeled dose with a range of 0.236 to 81.7% (p<0.0001). Mean (SD) percent cholecalciferol content was higher for the low dose tablets when compared to high dose: 51.5% (44.6) for 400 IU (p=0.015), 34.1% (13.2) for 1,000 IU (p=0.0277), and 29.9% (41.4) for 10,000 IU tablets (p=0.0077).

Conclusions: Many OTC vitamin D3 supplements have significantly lower vitamin content than advertised, which may contribute to the difficulty for some patients to reach adequate serum vitamin D levels despite supplementation. This reflects the need for increased regulation of the vitamin industry.
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Postby Rokkit » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:28 am

That figures. Nothing's ever simple.
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Tr1 Regulatory Cells and Vitamin D

Postby CVfactor » Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:17 pm

Hi,

It seems that Vitamin D has a direct effect on the regulatory T lymphocyctes known as Tr1 cells. These cells keep the Th1 imnflamitory response from getting out of control.

Here is a good description of this process:

http://www.rndsystems.com/cb_detail_objectname_cb10i2_vitamin_d_multiple_sclerosis.aspx

Here are some recent articles from the imunological community on the effect of Vitamin D on the immune system;

http://www.nature.com/ni/journal/v11/n4/abs/ni.1851.html
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0006635
http://www.jimmunol.org/content/182/7/4296.abstract
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17099776
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0012925
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18200504
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19843932

Here is a company developing cell therapy for Tr1 cells:
http://www.txcell.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=61&Itemid=145

It appears that the immunologist are way ahead of the game in terms of a cure for MS. Vitamin D and Tr1 regulatory cells seem to be the key.

Unfortunately, it does not seem like much research or attention is being focused on this in the U.S.
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Re: Tr1 Regulatory Cells and Vitamin D

Postby sou » Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:43 am

CVfactor wrote:It appears that the immunologist are way ahead of the game in terms of a cure for MS. Vitamin D and Tr1 regulatory cells seem to be the key.


If MS ever proved to be autoimmune.

CVfactor wrote:Unfortunately, it does not seem like much research or attention is being focused on this in the U.S.


Of course. Vit. D can not be patented.
Shortest joke: "We may not be able to cure MS but we can manage its symptoms."
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Re: Tr1 Regulatory Cells and Vitamin D

Postby CVfactor » Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:36 pm

sou wrote:If MS ever proved to be autoimmune.


"ThisIsMS an unbiased multiple sclerosis community" Not so much.
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Postby lyndacarol » Tue Feb 01, 2011 5:06 pm

The cause of MS is unknown. Although the scientists repeat over and over again that "MS is an autoimmune disease," every proposed explanation, including autoimmunity, is a hypothesis-- a suspicion without absolute proof!

Simply saying "MS is an autoimmune disease" 36 million times does not make it a true statement. Each of us may lean to our own particular hypothesis, but we try to keep an open mind and review the evidence in an unbiased manner.

I think most of the time we are able to be tolerant and respectful of others and their ideas. I certainly appreciate everyone's tolerance of my "insulin (slowly expanding to "metabolic") hypothesis." Thank you
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Postby CVfactor » Tue Feb 01, 2011 6:35 pm

It may seem to you that the scientists are repeating over and over that MS is an autoimune disease. Yes, this is a hypothesis, but it is based on a lot of scientific data.

This is the reason why I provided links to the scientific publications in my original post so that one can read for themselves.

If you have a theory, I would be glad to read any supporting evidence of this claim. Otherwise, just saying it 36 million times does not make it true (to use your words).

But I have been reading a lot of Sou's post and I think that alot of his responses to peoples input has been disrespectful and condesending to the origninal poster.

I don't think this is helpful to any who suffers from MS, in my opinion.
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Postby CVfactor » Wed Feb 02, 2011 6:13 pm

Hi,

Here is another link to a recent article that describes the factors involved in immunity homeostatis:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2869392/

This article describes how Vitamin D functions on the differentiation of T cells (inflamitory/anti-inflamitory) via imature dendridic cells.

Just one note on my view as to whether or not MS is an autoimmune disease or a vascular disease as proposed by the CCSVI theory.

In my case, I acquired MS by first being struck with Acute Diseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM). This is a MS spectrum disease that has a very rapid onset (it is more similiar to experimental autoimune encephalomeylitis (EAE) than MS is).

So, if MS is caused by CCSVI it does not seem that these acute forms of the disease (EAE, ADEM) would exist. In other words, the vascular restrictions would have to happen suddenly.

In my opinion, this does not seem probable.
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Postby CVfactor » Thu Feb 03, 2011 4:44 pm

Hi again,

For those of you that don't know, the key immune system cells (dendritic and regulatory T-cells) have vitamin D receptors (VDR).

This means that 1.25(OH)D3 has a direct function on immunity.

Here is a paper that describes this in more detail:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19031030

Likewise here is another paper on the same subject:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20678591
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Postby CVfactor » Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:19 pm

All,

Here is an animation of the role or regulatory T-cells in the homeostatis of the immune system:

http://www.abdserotec.com/animation/t-cell/

This is kind of an old presentation, but you can see that in the mechanism of Treg suppression #2, the enzyme idoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is responsible for initiation of the anti-inflamitory regulation or effector T-cells.

Fast forward to more recent data.

http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/132/5/1146.abstract

The paper above concludes:

"Finally, 1,25(OH)2D3 also increased the expression and biological activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, mediating significant increase in the number of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells."

Clearly, Vitamin D has a role in autoimmunity. The key thing is that your immune cells metabolize 1,25(OH)2D3 locally from 25(oh)D3.

Thus, your Calcitriol levels in your tissues may be quite different than that found in your serum.

So, any reccomendations for Vitamin D (Calcidriol) levels by your doctor is not based on the optimum to maintain immune system homeostasis.
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Sun exposure, vitamin D may lower risk of multiple sclerosis

Postby MSUK » Tue Feb 08, 2011 12:29 am

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People who spend more time in the sun and those with higher vitamin D levels may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published in the February 8, 2011, print issue of Neurology®,the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. MS is a chronic disease of the brain and spinal cord, usually with recurrent flare-ups of symptoms. It is often preceded by a first episode (or event) of similar symptoms lasting days to weeks.

“Previous studies have found similar results, but this is the first study to look at people who have just had the first symptoms of MS and haven’t even been diagnosed with the disease yet,” said study author Robyn Lucas, PhD, of Australian National University in Canberra. “Other studies have looked at people who already have MS — then it’s hard to know whether having the disease led them to change their habits in the sun or in their diet.”.... Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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