all things vitamin D

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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 14, 2011 5:10 pm

fyi

i really think magnesium is a big part of your puzzle, e.

the article below is mostly on track. however, AFAIK bottling has nothing to do with magnesium content of beverages.

the distinction should be city water vs ground water.

both sea water and fresh ground water contain magnesium.

city water has magnesium removed so that pipes don't get clogged.

that said, read on:

The Ignored Nutrient Magnesium and High Blood Pressure

...Paul Mason, a member of Life Extension, is concerned about getting the message across. Not only about magnesium and high blood pressure but the drinking habits of Americans which can cause heart disease and cardiovascular problems...

Paul Mason ... produces evidence based on extensive scientific data that magnesium is a, if not the missing link to heart disease, and high blood pressure control.

Examples of low Magnesium and High Blood Pressure with other complications

"Nature’s Calcium Channel Blocker" is the name they give to magnesium because it does what Calcium channel antagonists do, block calcium. It also modulates vascular tone.

Magnesium stimulates the production of nitric oxide, a mechanism at work when we exercise, helping to relax and dilate blood vessels. Not enough however causes a rise in calcium which restricts them...

...[adequate] levels of calcium but low levels of magnesium can cause persons to become obese especially concentrating most of the weight gain around the stomach. These people are highly likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes and insulin intolerance, known factors contributing to heart attack.

Magnesium and High Blood Pressure - Foods and Supplements

Drinking bottled water for health is a well established and growing trend with many drawbacks. At most you will only find about 30% of magnesium RDA in bottled water, making it a less than adequate source. Finding sources to make up the remaining 70% could be a challenge.

Choosing foods containing magnesium not only can be frustrating but tiring work, trying to find and match up magnesium food sources as well as potassium food sources, and so on. ... farming methods and over-production have depleted the soils of vital minerals.

A wise and easier choice would be to supplement the diet with a balanced mineral, trace mineral and vitamin solution, eliminating the headache when planning daily menus.

You can buy a mineral supplement that contains all your minerals, trace minerals and vitamins in ionic form, so they can be absorbed through the intestines and into the cells.

Keep in mind, although there is an abundance of good quality potassium, calcium, vitamin d, and magnesium supplements on the market, they need to be in correct measurement in relation to each other, so exercise caution when choosing which supplement to take...
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Re: RE MS LINK TO IMMUNE SYSTEM, LACK OF VITAMIN D

Postby HarryZ » Mon Aug 15, 2011 6:45 am

seeva wrote:Hello friends there is a news todays sydney morning herald regaring m.s and luck of vitamin D.DR. graeme stewart of westmead millennium institute who led the Australian NewZealand study and DNA research find 57 genes linked to m.s and the study of mre than 1000 Australian has shown that m.s is primarily a disorder of immune system and vitamin D deficiency could be an important environmental factor in its development

regards
seeva :roll:


You would think that if genes played such a critical roll in MS, the 8% heredity risk of getting MS would be a lot higher than what has been determined after looking at hundreds of thousands of MS patients.

I sure hope this new discovery isn't leading us down another dead end path!

Harry
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Re: RE MS LINK TO IMMUNE SYSTEM, LACK OF VITAMIN D

Postby mrbarlow » Mon Aug 15, 2011 7:03 am

HarryZ wrote:
seeva wrote:Hello friends there is a news todays sydney morning herald regaring m.s and luck of vitamin D.DR. graeme stewart of westmead millennium institute who led the Australian NewZealand study and DNA research find 57 genes linked to m.s and the study of mre than 1000 Australian has shown that m.s is primarily a disorder of immune system and vitamin D deficiency could be an important environmental factor in its development

regards
seeva :roll:


You would think that if genes played such a critical roll in MS, the 8% heredity risk of getting MS would be a lot higher than what has been determined after looking at hundreds of thousands of MS patients.

I sure hope this new discovery isn't leading us down another dead end path!

Harry



Quite possibly Harry. Problem is all the money is in genetics right now with epidemiology being the cinderella of medical research.
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Re: RE MS LINK TO IMMUNE SYSTEM, LACK OF VITAMIN D

Postby HarryZ » Mon Aug 15, 2011 7:12 am

Quite possibly Harry. Problem is all the money is in genetics right now with epidemiology being the cinderella of medical research.


Yes, research funding in the medical world is critical and it is very important to be in the "cinderella" category. I can remember when stem cell research was there and the possibilities for MS treatment were rampant. That certainly hasn't progressed as fast as they wanted with very mixed results. Kind of sounds familiar when MS is involved, doesn't it?

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High levels of vitamin D linked to skin cancer, study

Postby MSUK » Wed Aug 17, 2011 2:13 am

Image

Higher levels of vitamin D, still within the normal range, are associated with an increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer, researchers reported.

In a cohort study, people with higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were more likely to develop squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma, according to Melody Eide, MD, and colleagues at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

But other factors – such as increased exposure to sunlight – probably complicate the relationship, Eide and colleagues reported online in Archives of Dermatology. Ultraviolet B light is known to cause skin cancer, but it also increases cutaneous vitamin D synthesis, the researchers noted, adding that the relationship between vitamin D and skin cancer is complex and studies have yielded conflicting results.... Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/1334
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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anyone from Ontario know about vit D testing?

Postby kibibikel » Fri Aug 26, 2011 9:03 pm

Hey all,

Was just reading that OHIP is no longer providing free vitamin D testing in Ontario unless you fall under certain categories. Does anyone know if MS falls into one of the categories? Or how much it is if it isn't? I've only been diagnosed since April, but after reading some of the posts on here about vitamin levels and how nutrition has really helped quite a few people I've decided to really try and get that all figured out.

Thanks in advance for the help!!

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Postby oreo » Fri Aug 26, 2011 9:12 pm

Last I heard, no it doesn't.
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Postby jimmylegs » Sat Aug 27, 2011 8:06 am

hey there kelsey

yea so many people were getting tested, OHIP decided it was too expensive to provide for free.

a panel of 'experts' (none of whom seem to be known canadian vit D researchers) decided to ignore 30 years of literature on links between vit D and the immune system and suggest that the test doesn't matter for cancer, alzheimers, diabetes, or ms patients, etc.

if you have bone diseases like osteoporosis, or osteomalacia i think? etc on your file, you can still get the test covered.

if you are on meds that mess with vit D metabolism, you can still get the test covered.

i have a vit D3 lab requisition on my fridge and am curious to see how the next trip to the lab will pan out.

most tests that aren't covered that i have had done in the past, ranged from $30 to $40. i'd be curious to hear what ontario labs are charging for the vit D3 tests.

also if you doctor will not do a serum D3 requisition for you, you can pay to go to a naturopathic doctor who can do a requisition.

by the way NDs can do requisitions for all the nutritional blood tests, but OHIP doesn't cover any tests ordered by NDs. it's an optional route if you have the $$$ and the doc will not order the lab work for you.

HTH
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Postby kibibikel » Sun Aug 28, 2011 6:32 am

Thanks for the info Jimmylegs. I have my appt on Tues so I'll let you know what the actual cost is once I go. With any luck its not that much!
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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 28, 2011 7:30 am

sweet, thanks, i'll watch for an update :)
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Postby mavis » Sun Aug 28, 2011 8:25 pm

Last time (in April) the test cost me $33 cad. No, MS is not one of the conditions that are on the list.
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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Aug 29, 2011 3:52 pm

good to know, it's in line with other tests not covered.
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Postby CVfactor » Thu Sep 01, 2011 4:43 pm

It appears that Vitamin D has a role in modulating the immune system, namely the adaptive response of induced regulatory T-cells. It seems that these induced regulatory T-cells migrate to areas of inflamation and shut down inappropriate immune responses.

Here is a paper that describes this:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21723567

Although Vitamin D is best known as a modulator of calcium homeostasis, it also has immune modulating potential. A protective effect of Vitamin D on Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is supported by the reduced risk associated with sun exposure and use of Vitamin D supplements. Moreover, high circulating levels of Vitamin D have been associated with lower risk of MS. To gain more insight into putative regulatory mechanisms of Vitamin D in MS pathogenesis, we studied 132 Hispanic patients with clinically definite MS, 58 with relapsing remitting MS (RR MS) during remission, 34 RR MS patients during relapse, and 40 primary progressive MS cases (PP MS). Sixty healthy individuals matched with respect to place of residence, race/ethnicity, age and gender served as controls. Levels of 25(OH) Vitamin D and 1,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D, measured by ELISA were significantly lower in RR MS patients than in controls. In addition, levels in patients suffering relapses were lower than during remissions. By contrast, PP MS patients showed similar values to controls. Proliferation of both freshly isolated CD4+ T cells and MBP-specific T cells was significantly inhibited by 1,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D. Moreover, activated Vitamin D enhanced the development of IL-10 producing cells, and reduced the number of IL-6 and IL-17 secreting cells. Notably, VDR expression was induced by 1,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D in both activated and resting cells. Interestingly, T cells were able to metabolize 25(OH) Vitamin D into biologically active 1,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D, since T cells express 1α-hydroxylase constitutively. Finally, 1,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D also increased the expression and biological activity of IDO, triggering significant increase in the number of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that 1,25(OH)(2) VitaminD plays an important role in T cell homeostasis during the course of MS, suggesting correction of its deficiency may be useful during treatment of the disease.


And here is an article that describes the regulating role of Vitamin D within the central nervous system:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21862439

High exposure to vitamin D may protect against development and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS), possibly through the immunomodulatory properties of its biologically active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. So far, most studies on the possible mechanisms for vitamin D involvement in MS have focused on immune modulation outside the central nervous system (CNS). However, vitamin D may also interfere with the pathophysiology of MS within the CNS. In this review, the potential presence and functions of vitamin D in the inflamed and healthy CNS are explored. We discuss that vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein (DBP), the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and enzymes needed for metabolism (CYP27B1) are present in the CNS. Both VDR and CYP27B1 are expressed on a variety of cells, including neurons, glial cells, and invading lymphocytes. Additionally, vitamin D has been postulated to play a modulating role in several key-processes in MS pathophysiology, including inflammation, demyelination, axonal damage, and remyelination. We conclude that a local role of vitamin D in the inflamed CNS is likely and potentially relevant to MS. Future studies should further characterize the impact of vitamin D on the local disease process of MS in the CNS.


From my own point of view, I initially was struck with ADEM which caused me to have serious optic neuritis in my left eye (I would say a pain scale of 8/10) as well as complete paralysis of my lower extremitis.

I recovered from this attack in about six months, but sustained permanent urinary retention and ED.

I continued to have "relapses" that consisted of hand tremmors, optic neuritis (6/10 pain scale), leg weakness, vomiting and double vision. All of these symptoms would come and go and they might not all happen at the same time.

Since I have been on the high dose Vitamin D, the only problems I have had are left eye pain as well as leg pain. These symptoms seem to start-up but then eventually go away in a few days. These symptoms are nothing that I cannot treat and eleviate with Excedrin Migrane and Advil.

Interestingly also, since I have been on this high of dosage, I have not had any colds or flu which I usually get in the winter months. In addition, it seemed I was comming down with a case of a urinary tract infection the other day (it felt like a had to urinate all the time), but these symptoms have completely gone away in two days. I currently have to self catheterize myself and have yet to have a UTI that required me to get antibiotics from my doctor.

So, from all of the information I have read, Vitamin D definitely has seemed to enable my immune system to be more effective at halted these
autoimune system attacks that I used to have as well as preventing me from acquiring viral and bacterial infections.

Here are a few charts that track both the pain behind my left eye (optic neuritis) as well as leg pain:

Image

Image
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Re: Tr1 Regulatory Cells and Vitamin D

Postby Loumalone » Sun Oct 02, 2011 3:18 pm

Thanks for that,
how do you get that much vitamin D per day? I take 4x1000iu (the strongest ones ive found), how do you get that much? For all the vit D findings that are coming up i can't find a simple recommended dosage, and I don't understand most of the science above, sorry!

cheers, Lou
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Re: Tr1 Regulatory Cells and Vitamin D

Postby mrbarlow » Sun Oct 02, 2011 3:58 pm

Where are you Lou?

In the Uk you can get 5000 & 10,000iu gel caps. £25 for a years supply at 10,000 iu a day

http://www.jgsupplements.com/products/V ... tgels.html
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