herbals

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby Slumby » Sun Jun 12, 2011 12:48 pm

'seems like vit C makes me feel weird.
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Postby dlb » Sun Jun 12, 2011 1:18 pm

Hi Cece,

That is an interesting question & interesting responses that you have rec'd. I'm kind of getting ramped up for my procedure & have been considering adding to my supplement regime, based on the suggestions of several. Dr. Bill Code has a list of recommendations related to CCSVI treatment - things to start a month prior to treatment & maintain for 6 months post treatment. He does not have grape seed extract on his list. However, both Dr. Hubbard & Dr. Embry have listed grape seed extract in their lists of supplements for pwMS to be taking. DR. Embry's list says 2-4 capsules while Dr. Hubbard does not make a recommended dose. To quote Dr. Hubbard's CCSVI Supplements & Diet List: " Grape Seed Extract - antioxidant; more potent than vitamin C7E; improves cardiovascular health; anti-inflamatory"

It has been a few months since I printed these lists off of their websites, so I guess I should check to see if they have been changed.... It is on my list to do this week ( to purchase the additional recommended supplements...), so that I can try to help my vascular system out, pre-treatment.... now I wonder what to think?
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Postby LokeRundt » Sat Jun 18, 2011 9:31 am

Rock on, thanks for sharing
Image

*profile pic drawn by my wife, Mira Arntzen*
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herbs that help MS ,the EAE Model

Postby yigalby » Sat Jul 02, 2011 12:43 pm

I looked for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model exp.
made with plants or natural subs.

Resveratrol(Grapes) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19022403
Silibinin (Milk thistle) www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18038905
Aloe vera http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20233107
Berberine(Berberis, Coptis ) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20622114
Cannabinoid(cannabis) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21094240
Oleanolic acid(Clove,Thyme,sage,rosmarin) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19679109
Curcumin(Turmeric) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539560
Olive leaf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19386399

what you think about it ?

best
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Postby Algis » Sat Jul 02, 2011 7:05 pm

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Postby yigalby » Sun Jul 03, 2011 2:52 am

Algis wrote:You may want to look here:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/disease/multiple-sclerosis


nice info thanks!

I would like to know your opinion about this test,as i saw some of the regular medicine been checked in the same method(tysabri ,Copaxone ).

its probadly worth trying ist it ?

best
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Postby Algis » Sun Jul 03, 2011 5:47 am

Nothing's available here; but I'd try any and everyone assuming it is affordable, reasonable and easily obtainable...

Anything that does not make us worse is worth; but it is a very subjective opinion.

Best of luck :)
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Postby yigalby » Sun Jul 03, 2011 8:59 am

Algis wrote:Nothing's available here; but I'd try any and everyone assuming it is affordable, reasonable and easily obtainable...

Anything that does not make us worse is worth; but it is a very subjective opinion.

Best of luck :)


you mean nothing available at your place ? none of the herbs?
it just can`t be.
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Postby CVfactor » Sun Jul 03, 2011 4:10 pm

Talking about EAE in these parts could get you lynched. :wink:
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Postby Algis » Mon Jul 04, 2011 1:22 am

@yiga: it is pretty complicated; but yes, not avail in any 'med/supplement' form; and I am not really keen eating 2kgs of grapes a day with 300 grams of Curry and finishing drinking a glass of olive' oil...

I could cut aloe leaves to try but with only limited ability and a knife I will probably finish in the closest ER to get stitched :P

As I am sedentary (say completely crippled) I can't eat much or I will be very soon too fat to be manageable :D
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Postby yigalby » Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:03 pm

Algis wrote:@yiga: it is pretty complicated; but yes, not avail in any 'med/supplement' form; and I am not really keen eating 2kgs of grapes a day with 300 grams of Curry and finishing drinking a glass of olive' oil...

I could cut aloe leaves to try but with only limited ability and a knife I will probably finish in the closest ER to get stitched :P

As I am sedentary (say completely crippled) I can't eat much or I will be very soon too fat to be manageable :D


try to blend good turmeric powder in olive oil and some black pepper .
and take from the oil.

grape diet was usually 1.5 kg of grapes a day 250 gm every to from 8am.
so anyhow i don`t think it necessary to eat 2kg.

you can have juices,garpes,clove tea,olive leaf decoction or extract,curcumin\turmeric oil etc...
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Hawthorn for blood circulation problems

Postby yigalby » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:13 pm

Been used for many years for blood circulation problems.
One of the local arabic shaman told me that it work instead of angioplasty for heart disease.
part used is leaves flowers and berry .usually leaves & flowers or berry.

there is many research but my cut&paste dont seem to work now..


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Postby yigalby » Tue Jul 05, 2011 5:30 am

some research:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21384315

Planta Med. 2011 Mar 7. [Epub ahead of print]

Standardized Extracts from Hawthorn Leaves and Flowers in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disorders - Preclinical and Clinical Studies.
Koch E, Malek FA.
Source

Preclinical Research, Dr. Willmar Schwabe GmbH & Co. KG, Karlsruhe, Germany.
Abstract

Extracts from different parts of hawthorn plants ( CRATAEGUS SPP.) are used worldwide for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. So far, almost all clinical studies have been conducted with standardized hydroalcoholic extracts from leaves and flowers. These trials with more than 4000 patients have provided evidence for clinical benefits in the therapy of mild chronic heart failure. Besides cardiotonic effects, recent pharmacological investigations indicate that hawthorn extracts also possess cardio- and vasoprotective properties. Thus, these extracts may also be employed in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of such conditions as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or prevention of restenosis/reocclusion following peripheral endovascular treatment. In this review the pharmacological and clinical data relating to these standardized extracts are summarized.

------------------
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16161268

Space Med Med Eng (Beijing). 2005 Jun;18(3):157-60.
Regulative effects of hawthorn leave flavonoids on cytotoxicity, NO and Ca2+ in hypoxia-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells.
Lan WJ, Ge YK, Zheng XX.
Source

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the potential effect of HLF (Hawthorn leave flavonoids, w/w, 80% flavonoids) against thrombus formation, effect of HLF on hypoxia-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) was studied.
METHOD:

The levels of cytotoxicity and NO upon HUVECs were studied by flow cytometry. Moreover, the level of calcium ion in HUVECs was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy.
RESULT:

Data from this study showed that HLF at concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and 10 micrograms/ml decreased the cytotoxicity of hypoxia to HUVECs (P<0.05, P<0.01). The intracellular levels of NO and calcium ion were downregulated by HLF at concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml (P<0.01; P<0.01) and 10 micrograms/ml (vs control, P<0.01; P<0.01) too.
CONCLUSION:

Results observed suggest that HLF protect HUVECs from hypoxia partly through its regulative effect on NO and calcium ion levels.

---------------------------------

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16779533

Phytomedicine. 2009 May;16(5):462-9. Epub 2009 Jan 7.
Cardiovascular effects in vitro of aqueous extract of wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca, L.) leaves.
Mudnic I, Modun D, Brizic I, Vukovic J, Generalic I, Katalinic V, Bilusic T, Ljubenkov I, Boban M.
Source

Department of Pharmacology, University of Split School of Medicine, Split, Croatia.
Abstract

In contrast to the strawberry fruits, strawberry leaves as a source of bioactive compounds with potentially beneficial biological effects have been largely overlooked. In this study we examined direct, dose-dependent effects of wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca, L.) leaves aqueous extract, in two experimental models and animal species, the isolated guinea pig hearts and rat aortic rings. Vasodilatory potential of the wild strawberry leaves extract was compared with vasodilatory activity of aqueous extract of hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha, L) leaves with flowers, which can be regarded as a reference plant extract with a marked vasodilatory activity. The extracts were analysed by their "phenolic fingerprints", total phenolic content and antioxidative capacity. Their vasodilatory activity was determined and compared in the isolated aortic rings from 24 rats that were exposed to the extracts doses of 0.06, 0.6, 6, and 60 mg/100ml. Both extracts induced similar, dose-dependent vasodilation. Maximal relaxation was 72.2+/-4.4% and 81.3+/-4.5%, induced by the strawberry and hawthorn extract, respectively. To determine vasodilatory mechanisms of the wild strawberry leaves extract, endothelium-denuded and intact rings exposed to nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME or cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin were used. Removal of the endothelium prevented and exposure to L-NAME or indomethacin strongly diminished the vasodilatatory response to the extract. In the isolated hearts (n=12), the wild strawberry extract was applied at concentrations of 0.06, 0.18, 0.6, and 1.8 mg/100ml. Each dose was perfused for 3.5 min with 15 min of washout periods. Heart contractility, electrophysiological activity, coronary flow and oxygen consumption were continuously monitored. The extract did not significantly affect heart rate and contractility, main parameters of the cardiac action that determine oxygen demands, while coronary flow increased up to 45% over control value with a simultaneous decrease of oxygen extraction by 34%. The results indicate that the aqueous extract of wild strawberry leaves is a direct, endothelium-dependent vasodilator, action of which is mediated by NO and cyclooxygenase products and which potency is similar to that of the hawthorn aqueous extract.


-------------------------
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13823709

no abstract
Arztl Forsch. 1959 Sep 10;13:475-6.
[The effect of the Crataegus extract esbericard on the venous pressure and the venous tone in man].
[Article in German]
FOLDI M, KOVACH AG, SOLTI F, ISKUM M.

-----------------------------------------------

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19247189

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2009 Mar;53(3):253-60.

Crataegus special extract WS 1442 causes endothelium-dependent relaxation via a redox-sensitive Src- and Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase but not via activation of estrogen receptors.
Anselm E, Socorro VF, Dal-Ros S, Schott C, Bronner C, Schini-Kerth VB.
Source

Département de Pharmacologie et Physico-Chimie, UMR 7175, Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
Abstract
PURPOSE:

This study determined whether the Crataegus (Hawthorn species) special extract WS 1442 stimulates the endothelial formation of nitric oxide (NO), a vasoprotective factor, and characterized the underlying mechanism.
METHODS AND RESULTS:

Vascular reactivity was assessed in porcine coronary artery rings, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in artery sections by microscopy, and phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells by Western blot analysis. WS 1442 caused endothelium-dependent relaxations in coronary artery rings, which were reduced by N-nitro-L-arginine (a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase) and by charybdotoxin plus apamin (two inhibitors of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses). Relaxations to WS 1442 were inhibited by intracellular ROS scavengers and inhibitors of Src and PI3-kinase, but not by an estrogen receptor antagonist. WS 1442 stimulated the endothelial formation of ROS in artery sections, and a redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells.
CONCLUSIONS:

WS 1442 induced endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxations of coronary artery rings through the redox-sensitive Src/PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS.

---------------------------------------------------
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19712738

Int J Dev Neurosci. 2009 Dec;27(8):799-803. Epub 2009 Aug 25.
Hawthorn extract reduces infarct volume and improves neurological score by reducing oxidative stress in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion.
Elango C, Jayachandaran KS, Niranjali Devaraj S.
Source

Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025, Tamil Nadu, India.
Abstract

In our present investigation the neuroprotective effect of alcoholic extract of Hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha) was evaluated against middle cerebral artery occlusion induced ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with 100 mg/kg body weight of the extract by oral gavage for 15 days. The middle cerebral artery was then occluded for 75 min followed by 24 h of reperfusion. The pretreated rats showed significantly improved neurological behavior with reduced brain infarct when compared to vehicle control rats. The glutathione level in brain was found to be significantly (p<0.05) low in vehicle control rats after 24 h of reperfusion when compared to sham operated animals. However, in Hawthorn extract pretreated rats the levels were found to be close to that of sham. Malondialdehyde levels in brain of sham and pretreated group were found to be significantly lower than the non-treated vehicle group (p<0.05). The nitric oxide levels in brain were measured and found to be significantly (p<0.05) higher in vehicle than in sham or extract treated rats. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that Hawthorn extract which is a well known prophylactic for cardiac conditions may very well protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion. The reduced brain damage and improved neurological behavior after 24 h of reperfusion in Hawthorn extract pretreated group may be attributed to its antioxidant property which restores glutathione levels, circumvents the increase in lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels thereby reducing peroxynitrite formation and free radical induced brain damage.


---------------------------------------------

What do you think ?
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Postby yigalby » Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:33 am

another interesting research :

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16670285
Highly oligomeric procyanidins ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via suppression of Th1 immunity.[b]

Oligomeric procyanidins is strong antioxidant found in plants
especially from grape seed .
OPC found to be very god to blood circulating system.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14977436
Grape seeds are waste products of the winery and grape juice industry. These seeds contain lipid, protein, carbohydrates, and 5-8% polyphenols depending on the variety. Polyphenols in grape seeds are mainly flavonoids, including gallic acid, the monomeric flavan-3-ols catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, and epicatechin 3-O-gallate, and procyanidin dimers, trimers, and more highly polymerized procyanidins. Grape seed extract is known as a powerful antioxidant that protects the body from premature aging, disease, and decay. Grape seeds contains mainly phenols such as proanthocyanidins (oligomeric proanthocyanidins). Scientific studies have shown that the antioxidant power of proanthocyanidins is 20 times greater than vitamin E and 50 times greater than vitamin C. Extensive research suggests that grape seed extract is beneficial in many areas of health because of its antioxidant effect to bond with collagen, promoting youthful skin, cell health, elasticity, and flexibility. Other studies have shown that proanthocyanidins help to protect the body from sun damage, to improve vision, to improve flexibility in joints, arteries, and body tissues such as the heart, and to improve blood circulation by strengthening capillaries, arteries, and veins. The most abundant phenolic compounds isolated from grape seed are catechins, epicatechin, procyanidin, and some dimers and trimers.

more reading:
http://www.herbs2000.com/h_menu/opc.htm
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Another plant : BIDENS PILOSA

Postby yigalby » Thu Jul 21, 2011 2:15 am

Bidens for Th1-mediated disorder , a patent :
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2009/0062216.html

based on this research:
http://www.jimmunol.org/content/178/11/6984.full

this is famous medicinal plants in many countries :
http://www.rain-tree.com/picaopreto.htm

hope it help .
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