uric acid

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Re: uric acid

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:57 pm

Low serum uric acid levels in patients with multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica: An updated meta-analysis
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 4816300608
Highlights
• We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between serum uric acid levels and patients with MS and NMO.
• We found the serum uric acid levels of MS and NMO patients were significantly lower compared to those of healthy controls.
• We speculated that serum uric acid might be a potential diagnostic biomarker for MS and NMO.

Abstract
Objectives
To evaluate the association between serum uric acid (UA) levels and patients with MS and NMO.
Methods
The PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane Library database were searched for relevant studies. Pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as effect size. Subgroup analysis was performed by gender, country, disease durations, scores of EDSS, detection method and clinical classification.
Results
A total of 10 case-control studies involving 1537 patients (1308 MS patients, 229 NMO patients) and 908 healthy controls were included. We found the serum UA levels of patients with MS and NMO were significantly lower compared to those of healthy controls (SMD=−0.52, 95%CI,−0.81 to −0.24). In the subgroup analysis, there was no significant difference between serum UA levels in patients and healthy controls in European subgroup (SMD=−0.32, 95%CI,−0.78 to 0.14). Additionally, we found that serum UA levels were higher in MS and NMO patients than in healthy controls in EDSS>3.5 subgroup (SMD=−0.38, 95%CI,−0.58 to −0.19), but not in EDSS≤3.5 subgroup (SMD=−0.35, 95%CI,−0.97 to 0.27). Patients of relapsing group had significant lower serum UA levels than patients of remitting group (SMD=0.70, 95%CI, 0.19-1.21).
Conclusion
Patients with MS and NMO showed lower serum UA levels when compared with healthy controls. Serum UA might be a potential diagnostic biomarker for MS and NMO.


the higher se UA in the >3.5 EDSS subgroup is a bit of a twist, wonder what is going on there... in the full text table 1 seems a bit rough but it will be interesting to check out the studies in the analysis more closely. it's been a long time since i sorted out my low uric acid. have never seen half of the studies in this analysis before; they've all been done since i sorted out my own low level. (recall natural-approach-f27/topic18579.html#p53615 worked for me!)
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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jimmylegs
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Re: uric acid

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:45 pm

Low serum uric acid levels in patients with acute central nervous system viral infections
http://journals.lww.com/neuroreport/Abs ... te.11.aspx

'Most acute central nervous system (CNS) viral infections lead to either encephalitis or meningitis. Many neurotropic viruses may cause CNS dysfunctions through various mechanisms including oxidative stress. Serum uric acid (SUA) levels, which are associated with oxidative stress and antioxidant status, are reduced in patients with various neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis. We investigated the possible correlation between SUA levels and clinical disease status in patients with acute CNS viral infections. We measured SUA concentrations in 336 individuals, including 179 healthy individuals and 157 patients with acute CNS viral infections. We found that the patients had lower SUA levels than the healthy individuals did irrespective of sex. Effective therapy significantly increased SUA levels. The patients’ SUA levels were correlated inversely with outcomes as measured with the Glasgow Outcome Scale. SUA levels may be a biomarker for predicting treatment outcomes and prognoses for patients with acute CNS viral infections with inflammatory components.

"In our hospital, the normal SUA range is 208–428 mM for men and 155–357 mM for women...

"... we observed significantly lower SUA levels in patients who had neurological abnormalities (P=0.001), seizures (P=0.006), abnormal EEG results (P<0.001), abnormal MRI findings (P<0.001), or a need for ICU treatment (P<0.001) than in patients who did not have these conditions (Table 4).

.......................................ua in cases with............ua in controls
Neurological abnormalities..181 +/- 82...................225 +/- 69
Cognitive dysfunction.........188 +/- 82...................208 +/- 77

.......................................ua before treatment......ua.after
viral meningitis...................223 +/- 57.................285 +/- 78
viral encephalitis.................205 +/- 96.................261 +/- 100

"SUA levels were evidently decreased in patients with viral CNS infections, but effective treatments restored them. More importantly, lower SUA levels may be related to several phenomena indicative of disease severity, including neurological abnormalities, seizures, abnormal EEG results, abnormal MRI findings, and a need for ICU treatment. Furthermore, lower SUA levels were correlated closely with poor prognoses. Therefore, SUA levels may be a useful biomarker of acute CNS viral infections with inflammatory components and may be useful indicators for prognoses and treatment outcomes."

very interesting. i'd like to have seen a serum zinc test somewhere in this mix.

reference range locally is 140-360. i remember years ago the first time i heard about ua being low in ms (on this forum, btw), had it tested and when it came back 194 i was like "meh, guess ua is fine in MY case" <- jimmylegs, right before figuring out 'normal range' bs
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: uric acid

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:22 pm

grr info on low ua status in ms deleted on the uric acid wikipedia page. looks like death by a thousand cuts -whittled and whittled until the last piece left was meaningless. needs an updated lit review because there is no way that info should be just *gone*.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

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