on omega 3 fatty acids / fish oils etc

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best fish oil?

Postby mirskaya » Fri Jan 13, 2006 11:48 am

Hello, I'm new to the forum. Can anyone recommend the best fish oil capsules to take: i.e., the freshest and with the lowest mercury content? An MS specialist (neurologist) told me they were the "only valid alternative therapy." Thanks, Mirskaya
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Postby Melody » Fri Jan 13, 2006 1:50 pm

Nordic Naturals is my choice . Someone here steered me there and I checked into them and found them to be a good choice.Wow your neurologist really is close minded you might find him less then helpful long term. Just an opinion. :wink:
John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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fish oil

Postby mirskaya » Fri Jan 13, 2006 2:09 pm

Thanks, Melody. He's not my neurologist, but a childhood friend who now happens to be one of the world's "M.S. experts." But I've found that most neurologists, in the US anyway, are closed-minded where alternative treatments are concerned, as are most M.D.'s, for that matter. I am going to see an M.D. next month who's supposedly up on alternative therapies for MS and will see what she has to say, then share my experience with the forum. Thanks again. Mirskaya
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fish oil

Postby Katman » Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:33 pm

NPR had a piece on fish oil one day. Our whole family takes it including our 4 dogs! The best test, it was said, is to put ia capsule in the refrigerator and when it is chilled it should still be liquid. The higher the amount of foreign matter the more solid it will be.

Rica
2010 5 years 4 months Now on Amoxicillin, Doxy, Rifampin, Azith, and caffeine in addition to  flagyl. 90% normal good days-50% normal bad days. That is a good thing.
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Postby sojourner » Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:47 pm

Hi Mirskaya,
My husband takes RxOmega-3 Factors when he is on the road (no frig)and Carlsons fish oil (liquid) at home. We chose the Rx because it has one of the highest concentrations of EPA/DHA which means less swollowing.

As a matter of fact, everyone in my family takes it! Kids each get a teas. a day and vit D, too. Dad and Aunt (my sister) both have MS--can't be too careful.

Hope this helps, Lexy
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Postby Jaded » Sun Jan 22, 2006 6:36 am

Hi Mirskaya

Lucky you have good contacts - that'll be very useful.

I also take Nordic Naturals - the liquid CLO, which is available in an orange flavoured form. It doesn't taste fishy at all.

J
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Omega 3 and 6 research

Postby dignan » Tue May 09, 2006 7:52 am

More supporting evidence that PUFAs could be helpful for MS sufferers...



Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid supplementation stimulates differentiation of oligodendroglia cells.

Dev Neurosci. 2006;28(3):196-208.
van Meeteren ME, Baron W, Beermann C, Dijkstra CD, van Tol EA.
Biomedical Research Department, Numico Research B.V., Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been postulated as alternative supportive treatment for multiple sclerosis, since they may promote myelin repair. We set out to study the effect of supplementation with n-3 and n-6 PUFAs on OLN-93 oligodendroglia and rat primary oligodendrocyte differentiation in vitro.

It appeared that OLN-93 cells actively incorporate and metabolise the supplemented PUFAs in their cell membrane. The effect of PUFAs on OLN-93 differentiation was further assessed by morphological and Western blot evaluation of markers of oligodendroglia differentiation: 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Supplementation of the OLN-93 cells with n-3 and n-6 PUFAs increased the degree of differentiation determined by morphological analysis. Moreover, CNP protein expression was significantly increased by gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) supplementation. In accordance with the OLN-93 results, studies with rat primary oligodendrocytes, a more advanced model of cell differentiation, showed GLA supplementation to promote oligodendrocyte differentiation. Following GLA supplementation, increased numbers of proteolipid protein (PLP)-positive oligodendrocytes and increased myelin sheet formation was observed during differentiation of primary oligodendrocytes. Moreover, increased CNP, and enhanced PLP and myelin basic protein expression were found after GLA administration.

These studies provide support for the dietary supplementation of specific PUFAs to support oligodendrocyte differentiation and function.

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Postby carolew » Fri Aug 11, 2006 8:26 am

I just started taking Omega3 capsules. Is there a trick to avoid the burping that tastes like fish???? I take it in the morning with my hot coco and I think it melts the capsule too fast. I will try with just cold water next time. They should make these mint flavored or something.... :lol:
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Postby verminsquibble » Fri Aug 11, 2006 8:35 am

You may want to try storing the capusles in the refrigerator. A dietician I saw while in the hospital for a relapse suggested it to me. It does the trick for me. And I think avoiding any hot liquids is a good idea too.

VS
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non fish omegas alternative

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:53 pm

when you are finished the fishy ones you could consider a veggie omega blend containing things like flax seed and evening primrose oils. i think borage is the other one usually seen in such blends. but your vitamin d would have to come from elsewhere of course!
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Re: Omega 3 and 6 research

Postby NHE » Fri Aug 11, 2006 9:48 pm

carolew wrote:I just started taking Omega3 capsules. Is there a trick to avoid the burping that tastes like fish???? I take it in the morning with my hot coco and I think it melts the capsule too fast. I will try with just cold water next time. They should make these mint flavored or something....

I had problems with the fishy burps for the first few months that I started taking fish oil (I actually started with cod liver oil capsules and then later added omega-3 capsules). The solution for me was to eat some solid food immediately after taking the oil capsules. This would prevent the fishy after taste. For what it's worth, I no longer get any fishy after taste now that I've been taking fish oil capsules for several years.

NHE
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Postby carolew » Sat Aug 12, 2006 8:12 am

Thanks every one. Those are really helpful hints. Will try those today and the bottle is going in the fridge right now. :wink:
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Postby Melody » Thu Aug 31, 2006 3:59 am

Who ever said leave it in the fridge hit the nail on the head. Also did you know if you don't refrigerate them it can go rancid in a matter of days depending on the house temperature. No hot liquids either it dissolves it in your mouth or throat. Once rancid it is a free radical that causes damage to your system.Do yourself a favor store all fat soluble vitamins in the fridge. No exceptions. All water soluble needs to be in a dry dark place like a cupboard and not the one over the stove to much steam. Fresh is always best in supplements. IMO
John was diagnosed Jan 2005. On lipitor 20mg .On Copaxone since July 4,2005. Vitamin D3 2000iu-4000iu (depending on sunshine months)June 10 2005(RX::Dr. O'Connor) Omega 3 as well Turmeric since April 2005. Q10 60mg. 1500mg liquid Glucosamine Nov 2005.
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Postby Kt » Wed Sep 06, 2006 6:54 am

Melody those are some interesting points you wrote about. I didn't realise that Fish Oil capsules go rancid and would explain why my new pack of Krill Oil smelt really bad when I opened it. :oops: It had been sitting outside my flat for 3days during the hot weather! Putting it in the fridge didn't help either so I just learnt to contain my gagging!! I am just about to start on Hemp Seed Oil :? (recommended to me by my homeopath).

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Fish oil in the news

Postby NHE » Tue Oct 03, 2006 5:22 pm

Although it doesn't discuss MS, it's an interesting article nonetheless.

In Europe It’s Fish Oil After Heart Attacks, but Not in U.S.
By Elisabeth Rosenthal, October 3, 2006 NY Times

ROME — Every patient in the cardiac care unit at the San Filippo Neri Hospital who survives a heart attack goes home with a prescription for purified fish oil, or omega-3 fatty acids.

“It is clearly recommended in international guidelines,” said Dr. Massimo Santini, the hospital’s chief of cardiology, who added that it would be considered tantamount to malpractice in Italy to omit the drug.

In a large number of studies, prescription fish oil has been shown to improve survival after heart attacks and to reduce fatal heart rhythms. The American College of Cardiology recently strengthened its position on the medical benefit of fish oil, although some critics say that studies have not defined the magnitude of the effect.

But in the United States, heart attack victims are not generally given omega-3 fatty acids, even as they are routinely offered more expensive and invasive treatments, like pills to lower cholesterol or implantable defibrillators. Prescription fish oil, sold under the brand name Omacor, is not even approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in heart patients.

“Most cardiologists here are not giving omega-3’s even though the data supports it — there’s a real disconnect,” said Dr. Terry Jacobson, a preventive cardiologist at Emory University in Atlanta. “They have been very slow to incorporate the therapy.”

The fact that heart patients receive such different treatments in sophisticated hospitals around the world highlights the central role that drug companies play in disseminating medical information, experts said.

Because prescription fish oil is not licensed to prevent heart disease in the United States, drug companies may not legally promote it for that purpose at conferences, in doctors’ offices, to patients or even on the Internet.

“If people paid more attention to guidelines, more people would be on the drug,” Dr. Jacobson said. “But pharmaceutical companies can’t drive this change. The fact that it’s not licensed for this has definitely kept doctors away.”

For example, on Solvay Pharmaceutical’s Web site for Omacor, www.solvay-omacor.com, the first question a user sees is, “Are you a U.S. citizen?”

If the answer is yes, the user is sent to a page where heart attacks are not mentioned. (In the United States, Omacor is licensed only to treat the small number of people with extremely high blood triglyceride levels.)

So community doctors do not learn how to use the drug. Lack of F.D.A. approval also means that insurers will not pay for treatment with Omacor. Approval from the agency for the use of the drug in heart disease is not expected soon.

A study published last month in The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine found that only 17 percent of family doctors were likely to prescribe fish oil to their patients, including patients who had suffered a heart attack. There was a great need, the authors concluded, to “improve awareness of this important advice.”

The fact that fish oil is also sold as a nutritional supplement has made it harder for some doctors to regard it as a powerful drug, experts said.

“Using this medicine is very popular here in Italy, I think partly because so many cardiologists in this country participated in the studies and were aware of the results,” said Dr. Maria Franzosi, a researcher at the Mario Negri Institute in Milan. “In other countries, uptake may be harder because doctors think of it as just a dietary intervention.”

In the largest study of fish oil — conducted more than a decade ago — Italian researchers from the Gissi Group (Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell’Infarto), gave 11,000 patients one gram of prescription fish oil a day after heart attacks. After three years, the study found that the number of deaths was reduced by 20 percent and that the number of sudden deaths by 40 percent, compared with a control group.

Later studies have continued to yield positive results, although some scientists say there are still gaps in knowledge.

This summer, a critical review of existing research in BMJ, The British Medical Journal, “cast doubt over the size of the effect of these medications” for the general population, said Dr. Roger Harrison, an author of the paper, “but still suggested that they might benefit some people as a treatment.”

Dr. Harrison said he believed that people should generally increase their intake of omega-3 acids, best done by eating more fish.

Still, he acknowledged that it was difficult to eat foods containing a gram of omega-3 acids each day. “If you ask me do I take omega-3 supplements every day, then, embarrassingly, the answer is yes,” said Dr. Harrison, a professor at Bolton Primary Care Trust of the University of Manchester in England.

“I, too, am caught up in this hectic world where I have little time to shop and prepare the healthy foods I know I should be eating,” he said.

It seems natural for Italy to be at the forefront of the fish oil trend and home to the largest clinical trials. Scientists have long noted that Mediterranean diets are salubrious for the heart and theorized that the high content of broiled and baked fish might be partly responsible.

But the landmark Gissi-Prevenzione trial of fish oil had methodological weaknesses: the patients treated with prescription fish oil pills were compared with untreated patients, rather than with patients given a dummy pill. This meant that, despite impressive results, the trial did not meet the F.D.A.’s standards for approval. Yet by 2004, regulators in almost all European countries, including Spain, France and Britain, had approved Omacor for use in heart attack patients.

Marylou Rowe, a spokeswoman for Reliant Pharmaceuticals, which owns the license for the drug in the United States, said that further trials of Omacor would be needed for it to be licensed for heart attack patients in the United States. But she refused to discuss a timetable.

The American College of Cardiology now advises patients with coronary artery disease to increase their consumption of omega-3 acids to one gram a day, but it does not specify if this should be achieved by eating fish or by taking capsules. But over-the-counter preparations of fish oil have much less rigorous quality control and are often blends of the two fish oils know to be beneficial in heart disease with other less useful fatty acids.

For that reason, Dr. Jacobson of Emory gives the prescription drug, “off label,” to cardiac patients, even though the F.D.A. has not approved it for that use. “Then I know exactly what they’re getting, and there is no mercury,” he said.

He said he tells patients who cannot afford the prescription version that they can take the over-the-counter supplements, although there is uncertainty about the dose and they probably need three to four pills a day.

In Europe, meanwhile, research on prescription fish oil, which is now thought to act by stabilizing cell membranes, has gained momentum. The Gissi Group is conducting two huge trials using fish oil in patients with abnormal heart rhythms and in patients with heart failure.
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