on omega 3 fatty acids / fish oils etc

Discuss herbal therapies, vitamins and minerals, bee stings, etc. here

Postby jim4030 » Sun Nov 05, 2006 8:57 pm

why don't you try it with honey?? i use to take each every morning and add some honey with it all around... mmmmmm
try it and you will see that you will not get the bad taste that goe s up. :oops:
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omega-3 associated with increased grey matter

Postby dignan » Fri Mar 09, 2007 9:56 pm

Interesting research on the influence of omega-3s on grey matter.



Omega-3s boost grey matter, findings may explain why omega-3s seem to improve mood

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY, March 7 – Omega-3 fatty acids, found in fatty fish like salmon, are associated with increased grey matter volume in areas of the brain commonly linked to mood and behavior according to a University of Pittsburgh study.

Findings will be presented today by Sarah M. Conklin, Ph.D., postdoctoral scholar at the Cardiovascular Behavioral Medicine Program in the department of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, at the American Psychosomatic Society’s Annual Meeting, held in Budapest, Hungary.

Animal research has shown that raising omega-3 intake leads to structural brain changes. In a separate study presented by Dr. Conklin at the society’s meeting last year, Pitt researchers reported that people who had lower blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids were more likely to have a negative outlook and be more impulsive. Conversely, those with higher blood levels of omega-3s were found to be more agreeable and less likely to report mild or moderate symptoms of depression. In the study being presented today, the researchers sought to investigate if grey matter volume was proportionally related to long-chain omega-3 intake in humans, especially in areas of the brain related to mood, helping them attempt to explain the mechanisms behind the improvement in mood often associated with long-chain omega-3 intake.

Researchers interviewed 55 healthy adult participants to determine their average intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Grey matter volume was evaluated using high-resolution structural MRI. The researchers discovered that participants who had high levels of long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake had higher volumes of grey matter in areas of the brain associated with emotional arousal and regulation – the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, the right amygdala and the right hippocampus.

While this finding suggests that omega-3s may promote structural improvement in areas of the brain related to mood and emotion regulation – the same areas where grey matter is reduced in people who have mood disorders such as major depressive disorder – investigators note that more research is needed to determine whether fish consumption actually causes changes in the brain.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 030607.php
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omega-3 associated with increased grey matter

Postby TonyJegs » Tue Mar 20, 2007 8:35 pm

Omega-3s boost grey matter, findings may explain why omega-3s seem to improve mood

Yep, omega-3 is good for you.
One piece of information missed there. U need to have a great intake of salmon or herring for 20 years at least to achieve that. It is actually possible only in Norway or Iceland, from where this boom started.
I like omega-3 in my margarine, better than nothing :)

Kind regards,
Tony
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Polyunsaturated fatty acids

Postby TwistedHelix » Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:53 am

Just a little abstract which supports the idea that polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial for people with MS:

Inhibitory Effect of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on MMP-9 Release from Microglial Cells-Implications for Complementary Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

Neurochem Res. 2007 Jul 11;

Authors: Liuzzi GM, Latronico T, Rossano R, Viggiani S, Fasano A, Riccio P

We investigated whether polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which might be a useful complementary therapy among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), are able to modulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production in microglial cultures. MMPs are myelinotoxic factors. Primary cultures of rat microglia were treated with different doses of omega-3 (omega-3) PUFA or purified fish oil, containing a mixture of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA, and simultaneously activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Culture supernatants were subjected to zymography and Western blot analysis for the assessment of MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels. Increased amounts of MMP-9, but not of the constitutively expressed MMP-2, were observed in supernatants from LPS-treated microglia in comparison with non-treated control cells. The treatment with both omega-3 PUFA and fish oil dose-dependently inhibited the LPS-induced production of MMP-9. Our results suggest that a low fat diet supplemented with omega-3 PUFA may become recommended for the well being of MS patients under therapy.

PMID: 17624613 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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Omega 3 clinical trial results

Postby dignan » Thu Aug 23, 2007 9:39 am

This is good news:



Fish oil could provide relief for some MS patients

23 August, 2007 - A NEW study evaluating the effects of omega-3 on multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests that the intake of fish oil, containing omega-3 fatty acids, may have potential benefit in MS by decreasing MMP-9 levels.

MS is a disease found in one in 700 Americans. It affects women more often than men, and generally begins to show signs between ages 20-40. While the cause is unknown, many physicians believe it is the result of damage around nerve cells. Inflammation destroys the myelin sheath, which covers the nerve cells, and leads to multiple areas of sclerosis (scar tissue).

Health care practitioners often recommend eating fish at least twice per week because fish contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids contain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are known to affect key blood proteins (matrix metalloproteinase-9; MMP-9) and are produced by the immune cells of individuals with MS. The study suggested that the intake of fish oil, containing omega-3 fatty acids, may have potential benefit in MS by decreasing MMP-9 levels.

The study was conducted by L. Shinto, ND, MPH, S. Baldauf-Wagner, A. Strehlow, V. Yadav and D. Bourdette, all of the Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR; and G. Marracci of the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centre, Portland, OR. It is entitled: “The Immunomodulatory Effects of Fish Oil in Multiple Sclerosis.” Dr. Shinto is presenting the team’s findings at the 22nd annual meting of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. The conference will be held at the Palm Springs Convention Centre, Palm Springs, CA, August 22-25, 2007.

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on ten patients with MS. Ten MS participants received 9.6 grams of fish oil/day in an open-label study. An in vitro study using immune cells from healthy subjects was also conducted simultaneously to evaluate concentration effects of EPA and DHA on MMP-9 levels and activity.

The researchers found there was a 58% decrease in MMP-9 levels secreted from immune cells of MS volunteers after three months of fish oil supplementation compared to baseline levels. At three months, both EPA and DHA levels were significantly increased in red blood cell membranes. The in vitro study showed a significant decrease in MMP-9 levels and activity for EPA and DHA. Omega-3 fatty acids decrease both MMP-9 levels and activity and may act as immune-modulators that could benefit MS patients.

According to Dr. Shinto, the lead researcher: “These findings confirm previous research findings that suggest the intake of fish oil, containing Omega-3 fatty acids could provide a measure of relief for those with MS, a disease that is progressive, debilitating, and without a cure.”

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Fish Oil

Postby scoobyjude » Sat Aug 25, 2007 6:23 pm

Fish oil helps ease Multiple sclerosis symptoms

Washington, August 23 (ANI): A new study has found that the intake of fish oil, containing Omega-3 fatty acids could provide relief for those suffering with Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic, inflammatory and cureless disease that affects the central nervous system.

MS, believed to be the result of damage around nerve cells, can cause a variety of symptoms, including changes in sensation, visual problems, muscle weakness, depression, difficulties with coordination and speech, severe fatigue, cognitive impairment, problems with balance, overheating, and pain. In severe cases, the debilitating disease can lead to impaired mobility and disability.

Medical practitioners have often recommended eating fish at least twice per week because it contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, which have eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), known to affect key blood proteins(matrix metalloproteinase-9; MMP-9), and are produced by the immune cells of individuals with MS.

The new study assessing the effects of omega-3 on MMP-9 in patients with MS suggests that the consumption of fish oil, containing omega-3 fatty acids, may have potential benefit in MS by decreasing MMP-9 levels.

The objective of the Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, study was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on ten MS patients. The MS participants received 9.6 grams of fish oil/day in an open-label study. An in vitro study, using immune cells from healthy subjects, was also conducted simultaneously to evaluate concentration effects of EPA and DHA on MMP-9 levels and activity.

The researchers found that there was a 58 percent reduction in MMP-9 levels secreted from immune cells of MS volunteers after three months of fish oil supplementation compared to baseline levels. At three months, both EPA and DHA levels were considerably increased in red blood cell membranes. The in vitro study showed a significant decrease in MMP-9 levels and activity for EPA and DHA.

Researchers said that Omega-3 fatty acids decrease both MMP-9 levels and activity and may act as immune-modulators that could benefit MS patients.

“These findings confirm previous research findings that suggest the intake of fish oil, containing Omega-3 fatty acids could provide a measure of relief for those with MS, a disease that is progressive, debilitating, and without a cure,” Dr. L. Shinto, the lead researcher, said.

The study is entitled “The Immunomodulatory Effects of Fish Oil in Multiple Sclerosis,” and will be presented at the 22nd annual meting of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. (ANI)
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Omega 3 & 6 - how much do you take?

Postby Lainie » Mon Aug 27, 2007 2:36 pm

If you are supplementing with omega 3 and/or 6 and/or 9 by taking fish oil or flaxseed oil capsules, how much do you take a day? How many mg per day?

I've been reading all the postings about supplementing with omega acids, and although they all agree that it can be good for MS, none seem to indicate a specific dosage. I'd love to hear how much you guys out there are taking. Thanks!
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Re: Omega 3 & 6 - how much do you take

Postby NHE » Tue Aug 28, 2007 12:04 am

Lainie wrote:I've been reading all the postings about supplementing with omega acids, and although they all agree that it can be good for MS, none seem to indicate a specific dosage.

In the following study, 6 grams of fish oil per day were used. There was a significant decline in proinflammatory cytokines in both the control group as well as in the MS patients. I realize it's not much, but hopefully it will give you a starting point for making comparisons.

Cytokine secretion and eicosanoid production in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients undergoing dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
J Neuroimmunol. 1995 Feb;56(2):143-53.
    To demonstrate the influence of n-3 PUFA supplementation on cytokine and eicosanoid production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of MS patients (MSP), we investigated the impact of a 6-month dietary supplementation with these fatty acids on the levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the supernatants of stimulated PBMCs and serum soluble IL-2 receptors in a group of 20 relapsing-remitting (R-R) MSP and a group of 15 age-matched control individuals (CI). The production of PGE2 and LTB4 in the stimulated PBMCs was also assessed in patient and control groups supplemented with n-3 PUFAs. In both groups, n-3 PUFA supplementation led to a significant decrease in the levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, and this reduction was more pronounced in the 3rd and 6th month of supplementation. An analogous decrease was observed in the levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma produced by stimulated PBMCs, and in the levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptors. n-3 PUFA supplementation also appeared to significantly affect prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) production in PBMCs, both in MSP and the control group. The reduced production of these proinflammatory eicosanoids, and the decrease of some cytokines with an immunohenancing effect as a consequence of n-3 PUFA supplementation, could modulate some immune functions which have been demonstrated to be altered in MSP.

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Postby Abe » Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:57 am

I take 18 grams of fish oil. A high amount but in line with Professor George Jelinek's recommendations for omega 3 supplementation in his book 'Taking Control of MS'

I've also dramatically reduced my intake of saturated fats to compensate so I'm not taking too much fat in my diet.
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Postby CureOrBust » Tue Aug 28, 2007 2:41 am

I too (try) to take about 16grams a day; or more.
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Postby daverestonvirginia » Tue Aug 28, 2007 5:49 am

I take 6 grams a day. Three pills in the morning with breakfast and three at night with dinner. I also take two grams of flax oil a day. One pill in the morning and one with dinner. I found it can get pretty expensive to take more than this since the fish oil can cost a fair amount. I also have reduced my intake of omega 6 oils so that I have a better balance between omega 6 and 3. Try to eat more fish and walnuts.
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good clinical trial results for omega 6

Postby dignan » Wed Nov 21, 2007 12:44 pm

I didn't even know omega 6 (linoleic acid) was in a clinical trial. The results are very promising.



Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the pathogenesis and treatment of multiple sclerosis.

Br J Nutr. 2007 Oct;98 Suppl 1:S46-53.
Harbige LS, Sharief MK.
Centre for Bioscience Research, School of Science, University of Greenwich at Medway, United Kingdom. L.Harbige@gre.ac.uk

Epidemiological, biochemical, animal model and clinical trial data described in this overview strongly suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly n-6 fatty acids, have a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Data presented provides further evidence for a disturbance in n-6 fatty acid metabolism in MS. Disturbance of n-6 fatty acid metabolism and dysregulation of cytokines are shown to be linked and a "proof of concept clinical trial" further supports such a hypothesis.

In a randomised double-blind, placebo controlled trial of a high dose and low dose selected GLA (18:3n-6)-rich oil and placebo control, the high dose had a marked clinical effect in relapsing-remitting MS, significantly decreasing the relapse rate and the progression of disease. Laboratory findings paralleled clinical changes in the placebo group in that production of mononuclear cell pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) was increased and anti-inflammatory TGF-beta markedly decreased with loss of membrane n-6 fatty acids linoleic (18:2n-6) and arachidonic acids (20:4n-6). In contrast there were no such changes in the high dose group.

The improvement in disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale) in the high dose suggests there maybe a beneficial effect on neuronal lipids and neural function in MS. Thus disturbed n-6 fatty acid metabolism in MS gives rise to loss of membrane long chain n-6 fatty acids and loss of the anti-inflammatory regulatory cytokine TGF-beta, particularly during the relapse phase, as well as loss of these important neural fatty acids for CNS structure and function and consequent long term neurological deficit in MS.

Pubmed link
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Postby Lainie » Fri Nov 23, 2007 12:44 pm

These results are interesting. Does anyone know if the complete article is available online somewhere? So far I've only been able to find abstracts, and I would love to know what the actual amount of the "high dose" was.
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Postby pegs » Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:34 am

I read that The two essential fats should be consumed in equal ratio of 1/1...1 tablespoon for every 50lbs of body weight.the omega 6 is easily obtained from olive oil, butter, coconut oil.....the omega 3 can come from flaxseed oil, dark green leafy vegetables and fish oil.......there are countless other food sources to obtain these essential oils from..but the body produces omega 9 from the 3 and 6.....to restore balance you may want to use the ratio of 2/1 for a short time....double the omega 3 to your intake of omega 6. this infor comes from a site I have in my fovorites.....if you want the site let me know
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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:44 am

heya, i mostly just have omega fatty acids in my diet right now. when i do supplement them, i just buy a pre-mixed blend and follow the instructions on the bottle.
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