2017 study: Diet, serum Cu/Zn ratio and EDSS in RRMS

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2017 study: Diet, serum Cu/Zn ratio and EDSS in RRMS

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Apr 19, 2017 5:43 pm

YASSSSS hey science WELL DONE thanks for this one :D AWESOME.
Dietary habits, concentration of copper, zinc and Cu/Zn ratio in the serum and the ability status of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 071730059X
Highlights
•Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) , due to their antioxidant activity are important in the case of multiple sclerosis (MS).
•Decreased Zn concentration in serum and higher Cu/Zn ratio may suggest a connection between MS and oxidative stress.
•Various internal and external factors may have an influence on Cu and Zn concentration in serum.
•Higher Cu/Zn ratio in serum may be associated with inferior ability status

Dietary habits and adequate intake of antioxidants, e.g. copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) in the diet may be one of the environmental factors for the occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to estimate the influence of dietary habits on the concentration of Cu, Zn in the serum and the impact of Cu/Zn ratio on the ability status of patients with relapsing-remitting MS.

Methods
It was an observational case-control study included 101 individuals with MS and 68 healthy people. Food-frequency questionnaires were used to collect the dietary data. The serum concentration of Cu and Zn was determined by the electrothermal and flame atomic absorption spectrometry method, respectively. Cu/Zn ratio was also calculated and compared with Expanded Disability Status Scale of patients.

Results
The concentration of Zn was significantly lower in the serum of individuals with MS (0.776±0.195 mg/L) than in the control group (0.992±0.315 mg/L). Cu/Zn ratio was higher in the examined patients (1.347±0.806) than in the healthy volunteers (1.012±0.458). The lower ability status (p<0.05) was revealed in patients with abnormal Cu/Zn ratio, particularly, in the cerebellar function, pyramidal tracts and emotional condition.
Selected dietary habits have a significant influence on Cu and Zn concentration in the serum of patients with MS.

Conclusions
Lower serum concentration of Zn and higher Cu/Zn ratio in MS patients can suggest the relationship between MS and oxidative stress. The products that are the source of Zn should be included in the diet, which can improve the clinical condition of people with MS.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: 2017 study: Diet, serum Cu/Zn ratio and EDSS in RRMS

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Apr 19, 2017 6:46 pm

and let's also note that the ms patients' serum zinc levels would qualify as NORMAL many places... including the lab at my local hospital MS clinic which uses 11.5-18.5 umol/L (0.776 mg/L = 11.87 umol/L) and the lower 'normal' cutoffs from *some* labs i can think of from around here (ie TiMS) are even lower (like single digits lower. (8.57 umol/L) we have a lab here in town like that too; i've had a test done there as well (8.6 umol/L). TERRIBLE).
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 11553
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Re: 2017 study: Diet, serum Cu/Zn ratio and EDSS in RRMS

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Oct 17, 2017 3:17 pm

i'm just bumping this because it's so awesome.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 11553
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm


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