2018 review: evidence for diet & supplements in MS

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2018 review: evidence for diet & supplements in MS

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:51 am

The Evidence for Dietary Interventions and Nutritional Supplements as Treatment Options in Multiple Sclerosis: a Review
https://link.springer.com/article/10.10 ... 018-0494-5

"Abstract
Purpose of review
This review aims to critically evaluate published studies examining diets and nutritional supplements (excepting vitamin D) for the impact on prevention and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Recent findings
There is a negative relationship between the Mediterranean diet and vascular disease, and vascular co-morbidities are associated with a worse MS prognosis. Low-fat, fish-based diets, sodium-restricted diets, calorie restriction, the paleo diet, and gluten-free diets have been examined, mostly in observational studies; results are inconclusive. With regard to nutritional supplements, pilot data show a possible benefit of biotin with respect to disability worsening in people with progressive MS (PMS). The best designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for PUFA supplementation have not shown significant impact, but several weaker RCTs have. Many other nutritional supplements have been tested, including several anti-oxidants. While some early studies show positive results, no result has been definitive.

Summary
Unfortunately, there is no strong evidence for a direct benefit of any given dietary intervention on MS risk or prognosis. However, due to its relationship with vascular co-morbidities, the Mediterranean diet has the strongest rationale for employment in PwMS. Higher-quality clinical trials are needed to ascertain the possible benefits of nutritional supplements."

agree. some serious gaps in the literature, and at least one in this review as well (not talking about the omission of d3 in the analysis)...
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: 2018 review: evidence for diet & supplements in MS

Postby ElliotB » Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:48 am

"Unfortunately, there is no strong evidence for a direct benefit of any given dietary intervention on MS risk or prognosis."

Really? So many would disagree with this finding. I certainly do!

Sounds to me like the study is flawed. And why would they omit vitamin D as one of the supplements used which is likely of benefit to those who are healthy and ill most? And what were the other supplements taken?

And yet with all this they conclude the Mediterranean Diet has the strongest rationale for employment in PwMS. So many would also disagree with this finding too. I definitely do! And why would they recommend any diet if their conclusion of their study is that "there is no strong evidence for a direct benefit of any given dietary intervention"?

It is so easy to manipulate the results of these so called scientific studies and this one is a classic example!
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Re: 2018 review: evidence for diet & supplements in MS

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:48 am

access to full text does make a difference. if you have access, perhaps as an alumnus of any subscribing academic institution, have a read :)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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jimmylegs
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Posts: 11234
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm


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