The Multiple Sclerosis Diet Book by Roy L. Swank, MD, PhD

Discuss your favorite books here

The Multiple Sclerosis Diet Book by Roy L. Swank, MD, PhD

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Jul 06, 2008 1:44 pm

In reading this book again, I found ideas I wanted to post. Assuming it would be listed in the "Reading Nook," I looked here to add comments. If it is here, I can't find it; so I'll make a new entry.

For those folks who have a library of MS-related books, I recommend the first acquired book be Multiple Sclerosis: The History of a Disease by T. Jock Murray, OC, MD.

The second should be The Multiple Sclerosis Diet Book by Roy L. Swank, MD, PhD & Barbara Brewer Dugan. First published in 1959 and most recently again in 1987, it is often referred to in MS information. In my opinion, much of its information is outdated and even incorrect; for example, I do not support the low-fat diet idea for anyone. (I believe we need fat in our diet in order to be healthy, to manufacture myelin and hormones; we don't need carbohydrates.)

I find his ideas on the genesis of the disease plausible. Page 81
The random distribution of the symptoms and accompanying neuorological signs, and the frequent location of the pathological lesions (plaques, or areas of demyelination) in the brain and spinal cord surrounding small venous channels, suggest that the small blood vessels (microcirculation), which include the arterioles, capillaries, and venules, play a role in the genesis of this disease. This contention has been supported by the observations that small arterioles and venules of the brain and spinal cord are thickened, often tortuous, nodular, and alternately constricted and dilated, and by the occasional accumulations of platelets (thrombocytes) and small blood clots in small central venules inside the demyelinated lesions.

Page 87
In other studies, it was found that blood serum from multiple sclerosis patients (also from normal subjects) caused reversible demyelination of cultured nerve fibers and also blocked the passage of nerve impulses through these fibers.

Page 90
Swank and his collaborators showed that infusions of normal plasma into multiple sclerosis patients in exacerbation resulted in a rapid recovery of the patient, especially in the early phases of the disease.



If evidence has pointed to blood and the bloodstream, I am disappointed that researchers have not examined there thoroughly first! A few are starting now, I guess.
User avatar
lyndacarol
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2317
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby Terry » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:00 pm

Lyndacarol,
My jaw dropped when I saw your post. I pulled my Swank book out of the shelf yesterday to re-read. I was sitting in my backyard just 5 minutes ago reading it, and came upstairs to look up plasma and see WHY this would help.
My marker is on pg 80- just about to read the "highly technical" chapter, but I was curious about the plasma and decided to look it up before I go on.
Just wanted you to know that we are on the same page (almost) literally and (def) figuratively.
Do you get the plasma thing?
Terry
User avatar
Terry
Family Elder
 
Posts: 500
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 3:00 pm

Postby Terry » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:17 pm

Replacing your plasma may dilute the activity of the destructive factors in your immune system, including antibodies that attack myelin, and help you to recover. Plasma exchange has no proven benefit beyond three months from the onset of the neurological symptoms.


Is this it- to dilute?
User avatar
Terry
Family Elder
 
Posts: 500
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 3:00 pm

Swank and plasma

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:31 pm

Terry,
Keep in mind that I believe that excess insulin starts this MS thing, that I am NO scientist, that I have license to imagine all kinds of possibilities!

I know that insulin is damaging to the walls of our blood vessels.

I think that adding plasma to an MS patient's blood effectively dilutes the concentration of insulin. (By the way, anticoagulants were used to treat MS in the past; Vitamin E, gingko biloba, and fish oil thin the blood--aren't we using those?)

Lynda
User avatar
lyndacarol
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2317
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:00 pm

Plasma

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:46 pm

Terry,
Boy, are you quick! Yes, as I answered (though too slowly), I think the plasma dilutes the blood's concentration of insulin. I think that plasmapheresis also removes excess insulin temporarily (but it filters ALL kinds of other things out, like calcium, etc. and makes one very weak!)

These actions would only be effective until the pancreas churns out more insulin.

Dietary changes could be more long-lasting if diet is the only reason the pancreas is making too much insulin.

Lynda
User avatar
lyndacarol
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2317
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:00 pm

Postby Terry » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:56 pm

LC,
I pulled this book back out because I am thinking of changing my diet. I did some form of the Atkins diet for many years- starting even before it became re-popularized. I often wonder if this helped keep the MS symptoms away, or if it actually helped cause the MS. At this point, I am trying to eat a healthy variety, but there is nothing I steer clear of except artificial sweeteners. Seems that every decision we make is a gamble. What to do Lyndacarol.....what to do.
User avatar
Terry
Family Elder
 
Posts: 500
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 3:00 pm


Return to Reading Nook

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service