site reactions improving with 29 gauge needles?

A board to discuss the Multiple Sclerosis modifying drug Rebif

site reactions improving with 29 gauge needles?

Postby Bobble43 » Fri Jan 14, 2005 1:17 pm

Love those smaller needles! I guess it doesn't take much to make me happy.

Although the 29 gauge needles are only about 15% smaller, they have made a world of difference. At one point I stopped using my upper arm sites due to large red marks with severe itching and some swelling.

Since I've been using the smaller needles, the reddened areas are at least 50% smaller, some barely noticable, yea!!

I still inject manually, except for those hard to reach areas. The new Rebiject is an improvement, but still injects too fast for me ( causes more burning than the slow manual technique).

Next improvement, hopefully, will be a PH adjustment to lower the acidity.

Anyway, I hope the smaller needles have done the same for others. Would like to know your experiences.

Best Wishes, Bobble 43
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Postby carolsue » Fri Jan 14, 2005 5:47 pm

I, too, am loving the smaller needles, but have exactly the same site reactions. oh well, at least the pain is less.

and fyi, they apparently did increase the pH a tad at the same time as the new needles.

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Inject slower for less bruising

Postby flora68 » Fri Jan 14, 2005 7:21 pm

Just a few suggestions to minimize bruising, and forgive me if you already know all this:

1. When using very thin needles, try injecting more slowly to avoid the bruising that's more likely because of the increased force caused by the narrow gauge needle. (Your tissues will have a better chance to accomodate the injected fluid with less trauma if it isn't blasted in there like a tiny fire hose 8O ! )

2. But before injecting, always, always be sure the needle is perfectly clean(obviously) and dry, with absolutely no medication or alcohol on it.

3. While you're at it, make sure the alcohol on your skin has totally dried before injecting too. It probably won't help with the bruising, but does help prevent scar tissue at injection sites. Alcohol isn't good for internal tissues.
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Postby carolsue » Sat Jan 15, 2005 9:45 am

thanks flora, but yep, I do all those things. I wipe the needle, and when I use the autoinjector, I don't use the needle cap remover. I instead remove manually and wipe the needle clean. The bruising is the same whether I use the autoinject or manual. I think I just have sensitve skin.

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Carolsue

Postby flora68 » Sat Jan 15, 2005 10:10 am

That's a bummer about the bruising :( .

Still, if Copaxone seems to be helping you (if you've been on it long enough) then hang in there. Good luck :) .
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29 guahe needles

Postby newday » Sat Jan 22, 2005 5:18 pm

This is my first post...I read some things on this site that are new to me. I also began using the "new" needles. I do have site reactions of the redness, swelling and stinging kind. I inject manually and my husband assists in the hard to reach locations. I appreciate the tips on injecting because they have never been shared with me by a nurse or doctor. I will now let the alcohol dry on my skin before injecting but I need more details on the tip concerning a dry needle. I always get the bubbbles out befor injecting and some medication does come out of the needle and thereby wet the needle. What do you use to safely clean and dry the needle? Thanks for any advice in advance.
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Postby Guest » Sat Jan 22, 2005 6:12 pm

You wont have any problems if you dont push the air bubble out of the syringe. When you are pulling the needle cap off, be sure the syringe is pointing downward (towards the floor), this way if any Rebif comes out, it wont run down the needle. If there is a small drop of medicine on the end of the needle, dont wipe off the needle. There is a special coating on the needle that allows it to go in easier, plus you risk contaminating the needle. Just give the syringe (not the needle) a little flick to shake off the drop of medicine on the tip.

For redness and site reactions, try using Witch Hazel instead of alcohol. You can also use Tucks pads which contain witch hazel- its very soothing. Ive also heard that burning will decrease if you inject after a warm shower or use a warm compress instead of ice. This has worked nicely for some people. Finally, always make sure the drug has come to room temperature (preferably body temperature by holding between your hands or under your arm) before injecting.

I hope this helps- good luck!
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Postby namaah » Sat Jan 22, 2005 7:54 pm

I also remove the air bubble, if I don't the red area is HUGE and I just don't have enough space on my body for the injections.

The MSLifeline RN, Nurse Jan, told me to flick the syringe to remove any excess meds that came out. I've never heard of the needles being coated and can't speak on that, although it sounds odd to me.
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Leave the air bubble alone!

Postby flora68 » Sun Jan 23, 2005 6:50 am

Whoa, there. 8O Do not expel the air bubble before injecting Copaxone!

It's there for a good reason, to avoid wasting any of the tiny dose of solution. An air bubble that size will not hurt you, and expelling it before injection is something you should have been warned specifically not to do.

Plus, it keeps your needle clean and dry for injection. :)

Here's a quote from their product info:
There may be small air bubbles in the syringe. To avoid loss of medicine when using COPAXONE® pre-filled syringes, do not expel (or do not attempt to expel) the air bubble from the syringe before injecting the medicine.
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advice

Postby newday » Sun Jan 23, 2005 8:19 am

Thank you everyone for all the information and tips. I was instructed by the nurse who trained me to expel the bubbles. I'll give it a try without expelling. Thank you again!
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Re: Leave the air bubble alone!

Postby namaah » Sun Jan 23, 2005 11:02 am

flora68 wrote:Whoa, there. 8O Do not expel the air bubble before injecting Copaxone!


Copaxone or Rebif? This is the Rebif forum.
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