MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:04 pm

had a red meat craving and decided to go for some standard sub-par grocery store beef, rather than wait til ma grass fed missy gets butchered later this year.

had steak with baked potato, mushrooms and green peas last night, and tonight had the second steak in the packet as a garlic-onion-red pep-mushroom-beef-cabbage-broccoli stir fry, with tamari soy/peanut/chili/rice wine vinegar sauce, and brown rice. plenty of leftovers too :) easy lunch tomo!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 22, 2012 5:11 pm

breakfast today, a tea and a peach.
lunch, homemade vegetarian chili. i forgot to add corn to complete the bean protein though :S oops. snack, a small bag of chips. curse you, store-at-my-work! i know better than that - chips are reaaallly pro-inflammatory.
dinner, big green salad with sunflower seeds flax and cranberries, and a locally raised heritage tamworth pork sausage, chorizo style.
now quickly filling in the corners with organic chicken bouillon and sprouted multi grain toast, so that i don't have ANOTHER ONE!
not doing too badly on getting through today's supplements. i'm such a slacker on the vit d3 though. reaally have to shape up on that one.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:07 am

The effect of severe zinc deficiency on serum levels of albumin, transferrin, and prealbumin in man.
http://www.ajcn.org/content/34/9/1655.short
Abstract
Concentrations of three serum transport proteins, albumin, transferrin, and prealbumin, were determined in seven patients with severe zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency was manifested not only by depressed serum zinc concentrations, but also by skin lesions typical of zinc deficiency that corrected with zinc supplementation only. Concentrations of all three serum proteins were significantly depressed in zinc-deficient patients compared to healthy controls, and levels of all three proteins improved or corrected with a short period of zinc supplementation as the sole form of therapeutic intervention. Prealbumin levels dropped and corrected most rapidly, probably due in part to its short half-life of 2 days. This study demonstrates that zinc plays an important role in protein metabolism in man and is necessary for the maintenance of normal levels of certain transport proteins. These results support the possibility that zinc deficiency may alter tissue availability of other nutrients such as vitamin A or iron through its effect on transport proteins.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Zinky and the Brain

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:09 am

Zinc or Copper Deficiency-Induced Impaired Inflammatory Response to Brain Trauma May Be Caused by the Concomitant Metallothionein Changes
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10 ... LGO%2CJuan)
The role of zinc- and copper-deficient diets on the inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been evaluated in adult rats. As expected, zinc deficiency decreased food intake and body weight gain, and the latter effect was higher than that observed in pair-fed rats. In noninjured brains, zinc deficiency only affected significantly lectin (increasing) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) (decreasing) immunoreactivities (irs). In injured brains, a profound gliosis was observed in the area surrounding the lesion, along with severe damage to neurons as indicated by neuron specific enolase (NSE) ir, and the number of cells undergoing apoptosis (measured by TUNEL) was dramatically increased. Zinc deficiency significantly altered brain response to TBI, potentiating the microgliosis and reducing the astrogliosis, while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. Metallothioneins (MTs) are important zinc- and copper-binding proteins in the CNS, which could influence significantly the brain response to TBI because of their putative roles in metal homeostasis and antioxidant defenses. MT-I + II expression was dramatically increased by TBI, and this response was significantly blunted by zinc deficiency. The MT-III isoform was moderately increased by both TBI and zinc deficiency. TBI strongly increased oxidative stress levels, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde (MDA), protein tyrosine nitration (NITT), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) levels irs, all of which were potentiated by zinc deficiency. Further analysis revealed unbalanced expression of prooxidant and antioxidant proteins besides MT, since the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and Cu,Zn-SOD were increased and decreased, respectively, by zinc deficiency. All these effects were attributable to zinc deficiency, since pair-fed rats did not differ from normally fed rats. In general, copper deficiency caused a similar pattern of responses, albeit more moderate. Results obtained in mice with a null mutation for the MT-I + II isoforms strongly suggest that most of the effects observed in the rat brain after zinc and copper deficiencies are attributable to the concomitant changes in the MT expression.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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More Zinky and the Brain

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:11 am

Zinc deficiency in children with dyslexia: concentrations of zinc and other minerals in sweat and hair
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2545239/
This one's weird, no abstract but if you click through you can get full text. Awesome info! I have never been diagnosed with dyslexia but I know I used to have trouble reading analog clocks sometimes, eg mixing up if it was 20 to or 20 after, a problem that I haven't noticed since correcting zinc levels. Of course given common practise re 'normal' ranges, I imagine standard medical practise won't be able to use this research effectively, pretty sad.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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maternal zinc deficiency and birth defects

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 10:31 am

more interesting stuff

Congenital Malformations Resulting from Zinc Deficiency in Rats
http://ebm.rsmjournals.com/content/123/3/692.abstract
A mild but specific zinc deficiency was produced in female rats by the use of a purified diet lacking the element and by stringent elimination of sources of zinc contamination from the environment. Almost all of the full-term fetuses produced under such conditions showed gross congenital malformations encompassing a wide variety of organ systems, including skeletal, brain, eye, heart, lung, and urogenital defects. The fetuses from zinc-deficient females contained less zinc than did their controls, suggesting that the congenital anomalies resulted from a direct effect of lack of zinc in the fetal tissues.

Congenital malformations of the central nervous system in rats produced by maternal zinc deficiency
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 7/abstract
Teratogenic effects of maternal zinc deficiency in rats have been observed, confirming previous reports. The deficient diet differed in several re-spects from that used by Hurley and coworkers but the results were essentially the same. Special attention was given to malformations of the central nervous system and to tissue anomalies not recognizable by gross inspection of the fetuses.

Experimental Congenital Hydrocephalus
http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/pr ... tNr=235290
A review was made of experimental methods available to produce congenital hydrocephalus by teratogenic methods. Radiation, infections, trypan blue, hypervitaminosis A, salicylates and nutritional deficiencies were considered. In the course of prenatal zinc deficiency experiments, congenital hydrocephalus was frequently encountered and histologic sections were made of many representative specimens. Details of the findings are described, among them various types of aqueduct stenosis or obliteration. Although these anomalies suggest that occlusion of the aqueduct is the cause of the enlargement of the ventricular system it was noted that there was also ventricular dilatation caudal to the stenotic point of the aqueduct. Hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis has also been observed in experimental animals. It seems possible that some cases of congenital hydrocephalus attributed to aqueductal stenosis are examples of hydrocephalus with secondary block of the aqueduct.

Maternal zinc status: a determination of central nervous system malformation
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... x/abstract
Maternal serum zinc concentrations were estimated during 244 normal pregnancies and 15 abnormal pregnancies. The serum zinc concentrations were lower in the anencephalic pregnancies than in the normal control subjects.

Possible roles of zinc nutriture in the fetal origins of disease
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 6507002288
Risk of diseases of metabolism such as atherosclerosis and adult onset diabetes mellitus is increased by fetal malnutrition. Deficiencies of micronutrients essential for methylation are believed to contribute to the phenomenon in part through epigenetic abnormalities. Zinc is one of the nutrients essential for the epigenome. Because the worldwide prevalence of zinc deficiency is at least 20% (JL: by 'normal' standards), fetal zinc deficiency is common. We suggest fetal zinc deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases in adults. In support of our thesis, research in experimental models and humans established the essentiality of zinc at all stages of intrauterine and infant life. Experiments in rodents and/or non-human primates found that fetal and/or suckling zincdeficiency impairs neuropsychological functions of progeny and that the effects persist in spite of nutritional rehabilitation. In addition, maternal zincdeficiency in mice is reported to impair immunity of progeny; effects persist in spite of nutritional rehabilitation into the next generation. We suspect that zinc deficiency is a far greater human health problem than is generally recognized.

EXACTLY!!!!!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 23, 2012 4:10 pm

mm mmm, food! :D

enjoyed 2 eggs with swiss chard and a *little* pepperoni and cheese for brekkies.
tomato-pesto-kale-cottage cheese-mozzarella whole wheat lasagne for lunch.
half avocado and big green salad for starters, followed by cod, sweet potato, chard, and beets for din-dins.

yum!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: More Zinky and the Brain

Postby NHE » Mon Jul 23, 2012 10:02 pm

jimmylegs wrote:This one's weird, no abstract but if you click through you can get full text. Awesome info! I have never been diagnosed with dyslexia but I know I used to have trouble reading analog clocks sometimes, eg mixing up if it was 20 to or 20 after, a problem that I haven't noticed since correcting zinc levels. Of course given common practise re 'normal' ranges, I imagine standard medical practise won't be able to use this research effectively, pretty sad.


I have one of these hanging on my wall...

      Image

It'll mess with your head especially when looking at a normal clock after you get used to reading this one. It's also a little noisy and it interfered with my sleep so I had to take the battery out though it did keep good time. :geek:


NHE
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jul 24, 2012 5:57 am

ow, it hurts! that is crazy lol
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:56 am

wow that was a great brunch :D

onion-sweet potato-new potato hash browns, sauteed mushrooms, broiled tomatoes (with balsamic vinegar, herbs, and a little parm), baked beans, omelet (onion, red pep, spinach, chorizo from the local farm, eggs from the same, and a little sprinkle of old cheddar).

deeelish! time for coffee :)
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jul 25, 2012 3:42 pm

mmm having this food processor living on the counter is having tasty results :D

i keep making homemade hummous etc, and today for the first time in years i made some baba ganoush!:

one small eggplant, punctured and grilled 30 min, 15 min per side.
remove from oven, press out juices, scoop flesh away from skin.
place flesh in food processor. add juice of half a lemon, one clove garlic, 2tbsp tahini, 1tbsp olive oil, and salt to taste.

not an eggplant fan, but this is yum!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jul 25, 2012 4:17 pm

coagulation, clotting time, and magnesium

http://www.mgwater.com/seelig_prenatal_ ... ineral.pdf
"Preeclamptic women have shortened coagulation time and increased cohesiveness of platelets, both abnormalities of which are counteracted by administration of magnesium [42] .
It is possible that magnesium deficiency is contributory to this abnormality as well. Thromboembolic disease with increased adenosine diphosphate (ADP)induced platelet aggregation has been reported in patients with marginal magnesium deficiency associated with latent tetany [58 ,59]. Magnesium-deficient calves have exhibited shortened thrombin clotting time ; magnesium-deficient rats have increased ADP-platelet aggregation [60]. Hypercoagulability, caused by feeding rats a thrombogenic diet, was counteracted by oral magnesium
chloride , as was that of acutely butter-loaded dogs [ 61] . In vitro studies with high concentrations of magnesium show direct inhibition of several of the coagulation factors [6,62]."

*butter-loaded dogs*??? does anyone else ever feel guilty using info gathered in such a depraved fashion? why can't they just measure people's mag levels and measure various clotting indicators to assess correlation? surely people who need blood thinners anyway could be recruited to test magnesium effects? anyway. just throwing this into the mix. i knew vitamin E was a good K-antagonist, but unless i learned this before and forgot, i hadn't realized that magnesium was a blood thinner too. good to know!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jul 27, 2012 7:02 pm

did i mention i LOVE FOOD????!!! last night's dinner, homemade spinakopita, greek salad, tzatziki, hummus, and baba ganoush with some pan-toasted pita wedges, plus dolmades and black olives from the deli. tonight on the way home from work i picked up a camping bbq and some briquets, and as a result just demolished a tenderloin steak, half a baked potato, sauteed onion and king oyster mushroom, roasted red pepper, and mixed green garden salad. SO GOOD. i really missed bbq-ing. now i just have to figure out to get it a little hotter...
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 30, 2012 2:58 pm

omg, my mom saved this 'nature of things' doc-o for me and i can't watch. EVERY point they touch on has a zinc connection and NOBODY is getting down to that lowest common denominator. i had to walk away.

the autism enigma
http://www.cbc.ca/player/Shows/ID/2175032196/

enigma my ass. it's hard to sit there listening to dr. david suzuki narrating, while feeling so aggro over the stupidity.

Infantile zinc deficiency: Association with autism spectrum disorders
Elucidation of the pathogenesis and effective treatment of autism spectrum disorders is one of the challenges today. In this study, we examine hair zinc concentrations for 1,967 children with autistic disorders (1,553 males and 414 females), and show considerable association with zinc deficiency. Histogram of hair zinc concentration was non-symmetric with tailing in lower range, and 584 subjects were found to have lower zinc concentrations than −2 standard deviation level of its reference range (86.3–193ppm). The incidence rate of zinc deficiency in infant group aged 0–3 year-old was estimated 43.5 % in male and 52.5 % in female. The lowest zinc concentration of 10.7 ppm was detected in a 2-year-old boy, corresponding to about 1/12 of the control mean level. These findings suggest that infantile zinc deficiency may epigenetically contribute to the pathogenesis of autism and nutritional approach may yield a novel hope for its treatment and prevention.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Aug 02, 2012 7:05 am

The effects of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency on the endocrine and paracrine systems.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17909164
Abstract
Individuals are capable of producing vitamin D with proper exposure to sunlight. However, several factors can interfere with the effectiveness of this process. Most sunscreens filter out UVB light, thus inhibiting vitamin D production. Individuals with more darkly pigmented skin have greater difficulty producing vitamin D because melanin acts as an effective natural sunscreen, requiring longer sun exposure to produce an adequate daily allotment of vitamin D. Additionally, solely breastfed infants whose mothers suffered from vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency when pregnant have smaller reserves of the nutrient and are at greater risk of developing nutritional rickets. Vitamin D deficiency leads to rickets, osteomalacia, and osteoporosis. Long-term vitamin D insufficiency can lead to paracrine effects such as type 1 diabetes, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. This article reviews the current literature on vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and their relation to different disease states. Potential areas for research are discussed.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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