MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jul 09, 2013 5:16 am

on grains and the pitfalls of the 'science bias' .. wouldn't it be nice if we already knew everything science doesn't know yet :D in the meantime guess we'll just have to trust whole food.

Health-Promoting Activity Equal to or Even Higher than that of Vegetables and Fruits
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tnam ... ce&dbid=54

"...because researchers have examined whole grains with the same process used to measure antioxidants in vegetables and fruits—looking for their content of "free" phenolics"—the amount and activity of antioxidants in whole grains has been vastly underestimated.

Despite the differences in fruits', vegetables' and whole grains' content of "free" and "bound" phenolics, the total antioxidant activity in all three types of whole foods is similar, according to Dr. Liu's research. His team measured the antioxidant activity of various foods, assigning each a rating based on a formula (micromoles of vitamin C equivalent per gram). Broccoli and spinach measured 80 and 81, respectively; apple and banana measured 98 and 65; and of the whole grains tested, corn measured 181, whole wheat 77, oats 75, and brown rice 56.

Dr. Liu's findings may help explain why studies have shown that populations eating diets high in fiber-rich whole grains consistently have lower risk for colon cancer, yet short-term clinical trials that have focused on fiber alone in lowering colon cancer risk, often to the point of giving subjects isolated fiber supplements, yield inconsistent results. The explanation is most likely that these studies have not taken into account the interactive effects of all the nutrients in whole grains—not just their fiber, but also their many phytonutrients.

As far as whole grains are concerned, Dr. Liu believes that the key to their powerful cancer-fighting potential is precisely their wholeness. A grain of whole wheat consists of three parts—its endosperm (starch), bran and germ. When wheat—or any whole grain—is refined, its bran and germ are removed. Although these two parts make up only 15-17% of the grain's weight, they contain 83% of its phenolics. Dr. Liu says his recent findings on the antioxidant content of whole grains reinforce the message that a variety of foods should be eaten good health. "Different plant foods have different phytochemicals," he said. "These substances go to different organs, tissues and cells, where they perform different functions. What your body needs to ward off disease is this synergistic effect—this teamwork—that is produced by eating a wide variety of plant foods, including whole grains."

this gap in knowledge re synergistic effects is precisely why I stopped being vegan and transitioned to whole food omnivore.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby Anonymoose » Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:30 am

Hey JL,
How'd the MRI come out? (I think you had one...or was that my imagination?)

Looking for confirmation that my long term plan (which will hopefully last more than 3 mos!) will work. :P
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:14 am

my docs apt is coming up soon. I am preparing myself for it not to look amazing. I have done myself a lot of good but a lot of harm as well during the course of the learning curve. who knows how that will look after 6 yrs! i'm looking forward to having bloodwork done too. have been VERY lazy with it lately.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:35 am

interesting:
Effect of Zinc Deficiency on Haematological Parameters and Mineral Contents of Selected Tissues in Albino Rats
http://www.pjbs.org/pjnonline/fin568.pdf
Abstract: The effect of zinc deficiency on tissue level of some minerals (Na, K, Ca, P, Cu, Fe, Mg, Zn, Mn) in growing rats was investigated. Two groups of rats were fed either a zinc adequate diet or zinc deficient diet (6 ppm) for six weeks. At the end of the feeding period, zinc deficiency decreased the final body weight of the rats by 70% compared to the control. There was no significant difference (P < 0.05) in the packed cell volume (PCV) and the white blood cell count (WBC) of the zinc deficient rats was significantly increased (P < 0.05) compared to the control. Tissue content of minerals measured in the liver and kidney of both group of rats showed that zinc deficiency significantly increased (P < 0.05) tissue concentration of some elements (Fe, Cu, Ma, Ca, K and Na) while Mg and phosphorus levels were lowered compared to the control. This result suggest that zinc deficiency in rats could have adverse effect on intermediary metabolism as a result of interplay in the interactions between these minerals.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:46 am

Treatment with metallothionein prevents demyelination and axonal damage and increases oligodendrocyte precursors and tissue repair during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... ated=false
"Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE and MS are characterized by significant inflammation, demyelination, neuroglial damage, and cell death. Metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I + II) are antiinflammatory and neuroprotective proteins that are expressed during EAE and MS. We have shown recently that exogenous administration of Zn-MT-II to Lewis rats with EAE significantly reduced clinical symptoms and the inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the infiltrated central nervous system areas. We show for the first time that Zn-MT-II treatment during EAE significantly prevents demyelination and axonal damage and transection, and stimulates oligodendroglial regeneration from precursor cells, as well as the expression of the growth factors basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)β, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), NT-4/5, and nerve growth factor (NGF). These beneficial effects of Zn-MT-II treatment could not be attributable to its zinc content per se. The present results support further the use of Zn-MT-II as a safe and successful therapy for multiple sclerosis."

I think the fact that you wouldn't have the Zn-MT-II at all without the zinc in there argues that the benefit goes at least in part to zinc.

metallothionein
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallothionein
"Their production is dependent on availability of the dietary minerals, as zinc, copper and selenium, and the amino acids histidine and cysteine."
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 11:59 am

Zinc and selenium, site-specific versus general antioxidation (1993)
http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs ... eGiyMzD_q4
The essential nutrients zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) provide an antioxidant function to animal cells by very different mechanisms. Se is an integral part of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidases, a group of water-soluble enzymes that catalyze the destruction of water-soluble and, in some cases, membrane-bound hydroperoxides. In dietary Se deficiency, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities are decreased; at Se intakes above that which is required for optimal growth, there is a slight to moderate increase in Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities. Because of the enzymatic nature of the major role of Se as an antioxidant, Se can be categorized as having a general antioxidant function, controlling peroxide levels in cells by degrading hydroperoxides. On the other hand, Zn functions as an antioxidant only at specific sites, and is not a required cofactor for an antioxidant enzyme. Although Zn plays a structural role in the enzyme Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, the activity of this enzyme is not decreased in Zn deficiency and its activity is usually depressed at high Zn intakes. Zn may function as a site-specific antioxidant by two mechanisms. Firstly, it competes with Fe and Cu for binding to cell membranes and some proteins, displacing these redox-active metals and making them more available for binding to ferritin and metallothionein, respectively. Secondly, Zn binds the sulfhydryl groups in proteins, protecting them from oxidation. Zn status does not directly control tissue peroxide levels but can protect specific molecules against oxidative and peroxidative damage.
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info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 12:01 pm

Zinc, Metallothioneins and Longevity: Interrelationships with Niacin and Selenium (2008)
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/b ... 6/art00013
Ageing is an inevitable biological process with gradual and spontaneous biochemical and physiological changes and increased susceptibility to diseases. Some nutritional factors (zinc, niacin, selenium) may remodel these changes leading to a possible escaping of diseases, with the consequence of healthy ageing, because they are involved in improving immune functions, metabolic homeostasis and antioxidant defence. Experiments performed “in vitro” (human lymphocytes exposed to endotoxins) and “in vivo” (old mice or young mice with low zinc dietary intake) show that zinc is important for immune efficiency (both innate and adaptive), metabolic homeostasis (energy utilization and hormone turnover) and antioxidant activity (SOD enzyme). Niacin is a precursor of NAD+, the substrate for the activity of DNA repair enzyme PARP-1 and, consequently, may contribute to maintaining genomic stability. Selenium provokes zinc release by Metallothioneins (MT), via reduction of glutathione peroxidase. This fact is crucial in ageing because high MT may be unable to release zinc with subsequent low intracellular free zinc ion availability for immune efficiency, metabolic harmony and antioxidant activity. Taking into account the existence of zinc transporters (ZnT and ZIP family) for cellular zinc efflux and influx, respectively, the association between zinc transporters and MT is crucial in maintaining satisfactory intracellular zinc homeostasis in ageing. Improved immune performance, metabolic homeostasis, antioxidant defence occur in elderly after physiological zinc supplementation, which also induces prolonged survival in old, nude and neonatal thymectomized mice. The association “zinc plus selenium” improves humoral immunity in old subjects after influenza vaccination. The association “zinc plus niacin” in elderly is actually in progress.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:12 pm

yikes :S

Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3130893/
Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:29 pm

Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on ischemic vulnerability of the brain
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23085526
Deficiency of zinc, which modulates glutamate release, might increase ischemic vulnerability of the brain. We examined effects of dietary zinc deficiency for 2 weeks on ischemic vulnerability in several brain regions using dynamic positron autoradiography technique and [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose with rat brain slices. In the normal diet group, the cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglc) was not significantly different from that of the ischemia-unloaded control even after the loading of ischemia for 45 min. However, in the zinc-deficient diet group, CMRglc was significantly lower than that of the ischemia-unloaded control after loading of ischemia for 45 min. With treatment of MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist) from the start of ischemia loading, CMRglc was not significantly different from that of the ischemia-unloaded control. These findings, obtained for all analyzed brain regions, suggest that dietary zinc deficiency increased ischemic vulnerability in the brain, and that glutamate might contribute to this effect through activation of the NMDA receptor.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:20 pm

not sure how I ended up here, but, there it is..

New Insights in Insect Prey Choice by Chimpanzees and Gorillas in Southeast Cameroon: The Role of Nutritional Value (2008)
http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... eb4642.pdf
ABSTRACT The insect diet of chimpanzees and gorillas living at the northern periphery of the Dja Biosphere Reserve in southeast Cameroon and its nutritional contribution is described. We analyzed fecal samples and recorded additional evidence of insectivory. A detailed prey species list is presented for both apes. We carried out nutritional analyses (macronutrients, macro- and micro-minerals) on 11 important and eight nonimportant, but accessible, ant and termite prey species, and estimated the average nutrient intake/day through insects.
Although gorillas ate insects more frequently, the average prey biomass intake/day by chimpanzees was twice that by gorillas. The lack of tool-use by gorillas cannot be the
main reason for the small overlap of important prey species. Both apes did not seem to consume ant prey for one or more specific nutrients. Also other factors, such as medicinal use, should be considered. Termites, on the other hand, seemed to be selected for particular nutrients. Gorilla intake of the important termite prey, Cubitermes and Thoracotermes, met with estimated iron requirements.
Their potential role as antidiarrheal treatment is as yet unclear. Chimpanzee intake of the important termite prey, Macrotermes spp., met with estimated manganese requirements and the protein intake/day (mean: 2 g/d) reached significant values (>20 g/d). To fully understand the importance of nutritional contributions of insects to ape diets in Cameroon, the chemical composition and nutrient intake of fruit and foliage in their diets should be investigated.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:39 pm

Micronutrient challenges across the age spectrum: Is there a role for red meat? (2013)
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... ated=false
In recent years, there has been controversy about the healthiness of red meat, prompting suggestions that people should limit their consumption. However, national dietary surveys indicate that UK diets can be low in nutrients typically found in red meat, e.g. vitamin B12, vitamin D, iron, magnesium, zinc, selenium and potassium, particularly among low-income groups, teenagers and females. This article examines the nutritional challenges from infanthood to old age and considers whether there is still a role for red meat in helping people to achieve their dietary requirements. The fossil record indicates that early man evolved as an omnivore, with meat representing a significant source of protein and nutrients in the prehistoric diet. Modern diets offer substantially more variation in protein sources yet the range of nutrients supplied by red meat and their high bioavailability may make meat particularly suitable for human diets. Studies suggest that low intakes of red meat are a marker for iron insufficiency, while inclusion of red meat in the diet is associated with higher mineral intakes. Moderate amounts of lean red meat provide a wide range of important nutrients, without substantially increasing intakes of energy and saturated fatty acids. While concerns have been raised about the potential impact of red meat on the risk of chronic disease, the data are mostly observational and may be confounded by cooking methods or other dietary factors. In conclusion, integrating red meat into diets across the age spectrum, from infanthood to old age, may help to narrow the present gap between micronutrient intakes and recommendations.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:01 pm

VITAMIN B12 NUTRITION IN SOME PRIMATES IN CAPTIVITY
http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/155107
I can't copy the text over, it's an image. basically, they are b12 replete in the wild and become deficient when placed on vegetarian diets in captivity.

i'll have to check this out once I can wrangle me some full text action
STUDIES ON FOLATE AND VITAMIN B12 METABOLISM IN PRIMATES
http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/155301
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:06 pm

this looks like it will be fascinating

Widespread decay of vitamin-related pathways: coincidence or consequence?
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 251300053X
The advent of modern genomics has provided an unparalleled opportunity to consider the gene complement of an organism, and scrutinize metabolic pathways that are no longer active. This approach has led to an increasing number of reports of vitamin-associated pathway deterioration, with many indicating that independent gene-loss events of one or a few key genes have led to vitamin auxotrophy. Nonfunctional unitary pseudogenes belonging to these pathways are found in several species, demonstrating that these are recent evolutionary processes. Here, we examine the commonalities in the cellular roles and metabolism of vitamins that might have led to these losses. The complex pattern of vitamin auxotrophy across the eukaryotic tree of life is intimately connected with the interdependence between organisms. The importance of this process in terms of shaping communities on the one hand, and facilitating symbioses between organisms on the other, is only just beginning to be recognized.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 15, 2013 11:19 am

K SO i go on quite a bit about zinc and copper interactions but i have run into a couple personal friend situations recently, where the zinc-iron balance is of importance. i know plenty about zinc iron balancing at this stage, zinc deficiency consequences re iron dysreg and deposition etc, but i also went back over this thread a few days ago, looking to pull out specifics on my issues and bloodwork over time. i have to laugh at what a slow learner i have been, in the process of personally dialing in and locking down the whole iron zinc balance issue in my own results.

*my first hint about iron-zinc interactions. dates aside, my mentioning candida tells you how far back this was in my learning curve:
august 5, 2006
ok so i did mention the iron problem in a previous post or two, and i have managed to get my hands on some good potent ferrous sulfate in order to address that deficiency. however, i've been getting to feel kind of crappy too.
on another tangent i had been looking at zinc for management of candida albicans, but it turned out to have more links to my overall health than i had anticipated! so in the end i read that high doses of iron can really screw up your zinc. now zinc is a toughie for vegetarians, and when you add in that high dose of iron then you're really in for some fun. the jimmylegs made an emphatic reappearance over the last few days. but now am taking some big zinc doses along with the iron, and will keep u all posted on the outcome. legs seem fine now after only two doses of zinc, and i have noticed instant outcomes from supplements in the past, but i want to see if the legs are jumping this eve before i have any confidence that the situation has been put onto the right path again. freaking nutrition. lol!
*here i haven't started to measure zinc yet, and i haven't learned about the zinc-uric acid connection, but you see the iron going up and because the uric acid is low, we know the zinc is down too:
oct 23, 2006
i have been working on a number of nutrients but the last set of tests were for vitamin B12, 25(OH)D3, and Iron. ...
the iron has gone from deficient (under 20 i believe) to 78. normal range 20-180. so, feeling good about that.
now, on to uric acid. at the last test i was 194 µmol/L (3.26 mg/dL). normal is 140-340 µmol/L (3.0 - 7.2 mg/dL). however, the study below places my nice little uric acid value right in the ms camp. so my next task is to get the danged UA up into the "control group" range. garçon! some liverwurst, s'ilvousplaít!
*i'm still not measuring zinc. i'm working to keep my ferritin status in line, and the pesky low uric acid numbers provide the clues to persistent low zinc levels.
march 30 2007
serum ferritin is now 64, it was 36 a year and a bit ago. this probably reflects a few rounds of supplementation and the switch to eating animal products. so that's all good. ... uric acid is a shocking 185. this is bad news as i was at 194 early in 2006 when all the $h!t hit the fan, and i was trying through eating meat to get up to the optimal 290 level. i will have to get on the inosine bandwagon, but in the meantime will eat steak and kidney pie every day for a week and see how that pans out hehehe! [2012 comment: WRONG WRONG WRONG. do not throw high purine foods into a zinc deficient body that can't effectively make the conversion from ammonia to urea to uric acid. you'll just drive up your ammonia levels....
*i go back over things, reconnect zinc iron interactions, and here we go with another round of balancing.
april 2, 2007
... i remembered that my second bout with the jimmylegs problem ... was partly iron, but rereading this forum, i realize it must have been zinc working with iron so have added zinc back into the daily mix for a while, will keep yas posted. only started taking the zinc last night and there hasn't been a jimmyleg incident yet today but we shall see!
*ooh look at me, maybe things are starting to stick (can you say cognitive issues...)
oct 14 2007
new stuff:
-finally started back in with the iron liquid about three days ago, so added 50mg zinc per day to go with it..
*and here i FINALLY start measuring ferritin, zinc AND uric acid at the same time (BUT have totally gapped on the iron zinc balance. re-read early notes AGAIN.. discover the connection AGAIN..):
jan 14 2008
okay, so since my last post i have been really slacking on the supplements, ... it's about time to get back on the supplement regimen again, as the legs have started to go jimmy again and everything.
serum ferritin;................82; (51 - 140); "probably not iron deficient"
Uric Acid;....................194; (150 - 350)
zinc;.........................8.6; (11.5 - 18.5)
... so for ferritin: gotta get it out of that "probably not" range into the "definitely not" range. because of that thing where iron assays over-represent your levels if you have an "autoimmune" condition.
... uric acid: BOO! stupid ms average, on the dot, AGAIN. food is not doing the trick, apparently.
... zinc: interesting. i had not looked carefully through my posts once my legs went squirrelly during this last long layoff from the supplements. i kept having good intentions and then slacking. the legs started to jimmy out on me again. i remembered an iron connection. i have purchased some within the last week and it worked somewhat. now my bloodwork shows low zinc. i just re-read my posts more thoroughly to note how while in australia i had connected the remaining jimmylegs issues to zinc, to resolve it the rest of the way.
so, i'll take zinc with meals, iron in between, and let you know if the jimmy thing backs off again..
*now, i am pretty solid on the zinc-jimmylegs connection
jan 15 2008
little zinc update. i took 2x 15mg pills a few times, but the legs were still kind of jumpy. last night and through today, i have taken 2x 50mg zinc pills, at three separate times.
it came to me that if my zinc was deficient in november, and i hadn't taken any since then, that the situation probably was more dire than the 8.6 so i'm hitting it harder than i usually would. i think it is starting to work but will keep an eye on it and post tomorrow's jimmyleg status after some more 100mg zinc doses. or maybe i'll drop back to 50 at a time. depends how the legs are doing!
*definitely on top of it here...
jan 16 2008
i was lying in bed this morning, and felt a sudden spiky itch, like a pinprick, in my right foot. a couple of days ago my leg would have shot up in the air in response, but today i just felt a very slight suggestion of tension. mind you i felt sick to my stomach after my bedtime 100mg dose of zinc last night, so i'll probably back it off to 50mg per meal for today, and report back on the jimmylegs later. i'll set up an appointment for my D3 megadose prescription, and a zinc test requisition too, so that we can see if my zinc level is attaining normal range as the legs settle back down.
*and... zinc goes high for the first time!!! strong suspicions that I mentioned iron specifically as a strategy for managing this 'high' zinc level.
june 2008
okay drum roll please...
zinc normal range: 11.5-18.5
nov 30 zinc test: 8.6
jun 9 zinc test: 20.6
(june 9 test was after a 1 week washout with no zinc supplementation but i forgot and did have food that day prior to the test)
moral of the story: prioritize the follow up test. i shouldn't have let it go that long.
next step: check on my uric acid. and take iron for a couple weeks.
*a second set of tests looking at Fe Zn and UA all at once
april 17 2009
so, went for my bloodwork this morning - b12, d3, ferritin, RBC folate, uric acid, copper, zinc and magnesium. big pile o phials.
*next, zinc goes quite a ways down.. and look at that, up popped ferritin. no coincidence there... ASIDE: look at that zinc copper ratio ABSOLUTE GARBAGE! dangerous
april 27 2009
all right, some preliminary numbers are in from the lab..
Code:
11/30/07 4/17/09 range target
zinc 8.60 11.60 11.5- 18.5 ~18.2umol/L
UA 194.00 255.00 140.0-360.0 ~300nmol/L
fe 82.00 91.00 10.0-291.0 TBD ug/L
mg .88 .94 .7- 1.0* >0.9mmol/L
cu N/A 18.20 11.0- 30.0 TBD umol/L
ZINC :?: ...only 11.6. have had another test since then, read on...
URIC ACID :D is AWESOME. i read some studies that had me thinking the UA status would improve once i dealt with that zinc deficiency. TRUE! still have a ways to go, though.
IRON :) ferritin 82 ug/L was "probably not iron deficient" and so is 91. you have to get up to 140 to be "not iron deficient" and over 400 is "possible iron overload". i'm happy with it being a little better. .
may 5 2009
got some more info from the lab today, and updated the table accordingly, above (prev page, that is).
zinc came in still quite low at 11.6. i'm surprised the uric acid increased so much when i only got the zinc raised from 8.6 in nov '07 to 11.6 now (not counting that high blip in early '08!)
once i get the mix right and can keep the zinc closer to 18, i am hoping my uric acid levels will be right up near 300..
jul 7 2009
jun 19 labwork is starting to come in.
i actually overdid it with the D3!?!
instead of getting it up to 150 like the first time, this time around it went from 103 to 271 nmol/L!!!
i think this might be because of fixing the zinc deficiency, but i'm not clear on exactly how yet.
more good news re: zinc and uric acid. i'm up to 16.1 with the zinc, and the uric acid has jumped again, right in synch - it's at 278 now!!! only 12 more to go..
*more toying with the balance. i was way more interested in the zinc UA correlations but the ferritin number is interesting. yes when zinc intake drops you'd expect UA to drop too, but it's interesting and consistent that the ferritin has jumped as well. for whatever idiotic reason it actually looks like I simultaneously increased supplemental iron and decreased supplemental zinc. way to go, genius:
jan 26 2012
preliminary bloods are in already. that was fast. ...
urate (uric acid) 230 umol/L
balls. that is an 'ms patient in remission' average, according to research, not a healthy control number at all. will need to get this up to 290-300 umol/L. this bad result probably means my zinc levels are crap too, we'll see. i had been cutting back on zinc supplements over the last while, ie 50mg every other day rather than every day, to test if i would still be okay. guess not :S might be an issue with % absorption per pill - i probably don't actually absorb the full amounts stated on my multi and separate 50mg zinc/2mg copper pill.
ferritin 153 ug/L
fine and dandy. i like to be at least 100. my lab's ranges seem to have changed and show normal as 80 to 300 now, rather than 100 to 300. don't know why. i wouldn't want to go over 200 necessarily, but you know how i feel about ranges in general practice...
anyway based on this result (high-ish for me) i think i may be able to quit supplementing extra iron around 'that time of month'. looks like my red meat intake (1-2 servings every 6 days) plus the multi may be sufficient..
feb 9 2012
zinc = 14.6 umol/L better than expected but still not good enough. definitely in the 'ms' sector of the 'normal' range.


i think i will plot these out some time for a quick easy graphic representation. in big letters and flashy colours so that I don't lose this important piece of info EVER AGAIN
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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jimmylegs
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jul 15, 2013 5:13 pm

i just want to underline in red here, for those who did not read all of the above, that the bulk of the evidence points to my having given mySELF my 'jimmylegs', right from day one. because I started with low iron and zinc levels, only knew about the low iron (at first), and then proceeded to add iron only, driving zinc down further.
and then I did the same thing over and over and over, even after I knew about the zinc issue... causing the jimmylegs every single time. right up until as late as early last year.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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jimmylegs
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Posts: 9252
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

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