MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:28 am

went to a neat wild meats vendor yesterday - picked up some stewing venison, and some ground bison patties. interesting! will have to figure out what I will put in my venison stew. a nice project for a rainy autumn sunday :)
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:23 am

distracted from venison by thanksgiving.. turkey, check. butternut squash, check. cranberry-apple cider sauce, check. brussels sprouts prepped. potatoes and carrots washed and ready for the pressure cooker. minted green peas pending. gravy pending. stuffing? that's only a maybe right now.

enough food procrastinating.. have an early interim thesis deadline tomorrow. back to business!

oh yes and i'm moving to grad housing today :S still have some post-op gimpiness going on, but at this point i would rather deal with a few stairs and be able to stay off the road for the extra 90 mins in the morning!

have to go check on this cranberry sauce. trying to make it by reducing apple cider cup by cup.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 14, 2013 8:39 am

I caved and added 1/3c of sugar to the cranapple sauce :S ah well! now to see if it sets up a bit once it cools down.

I just roasted the butternut squash seeds with salt. TASTY :) I like them much better than pumpkin seeds.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:09 am

another excellent argument for choosing organic produce:

Cadmium in aquatic ecosystems in Western Australia: A legacy of nutrient-deficient soils
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9799903043

More than 273 tonnes of cadmium have been added to Western Australian ecosystems through the application of superphosphate fertilisers since 1982. Fifty percent of this is water soluble and therefore eventually leaches into waterbodies and accumulates in the sediments. From this source, it enters the food web through algae and benthic animals and may ultimately be passed to humans. This is reflected in the cadmium levels of the freshwater mussels (Westralunio carteri) that exceeded statutory Australia New Zealand Food Authority (ANZFA) guidelines for Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) with respect to human consumption. The cadmium levels bioaccumulated in freshwater mussels elevated with increasing catchment clearing, being highest in degraded catchments. The MPC for Cd in crustaceans have recently been removed, yet tissues within the freshwater crayfish (Cherax tenuimanus) frequently exceeded the old MPC (0·2 μCd g−1wet weight). Marron are sometimes consumed in considerable quantities and the risk to human health posed by a high Cd intake is briefly summarised. Finally, a number of management options concerned with reducing the level of Cd from fertilisers passing to humans are reviewed.

shocking: "The [Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) with respect to human consumption] for Cd in crustaceans have recently been removed"

dangerous stuff. recall: cadmium is structurally similar to zinc and can be mistaken for zinc by human receptors
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:51 am

just searching for plant nutrient deficiency, running across all this fascinating info re mainstream conventional fertilization dynamics

Plant physiology online
http://5e.plantphys.net/article.php?id=289
Environmental Associations
Plants remove substantial amounts of nutrients from the soil during their normal growth cycle and many long-term environmental changes occur as a result of this process. Effects on the soil go considerably beyond the straight removal or depletion of nutrients. Charge balance must be maintained in the plant-soil system during nutrient uptake. Charge balance is usually achieved by the excretion of proton and/or hydroxyl ions by the plant to replace the absorbed nutrient cations or anions. For example when plants are fertilized with ammonia, they acquire most of their nitrogen in the form of the ammonium cation, rather than from the usual nitrate anion. Because nitrate is the only anion used by the plant in large amounts, the net result of this change is that during normal nutrient uptake the proton excretion will far exceed that of hydroxyl ions. In the case of vigorously growing plants, the amount of excreted protons can be sufficiently large as to decrease the pH of the soil by several pH units. Changes in soil pH of such magnitude can have large implications for a number of soil processes such as soil structure, nutrient availability and leaching of nutrients. The immediate effect on the soil may be favorable for some plants, especially acid-loving plants, in that it tends to make iron more available. However, in the long run, lowering the soil pH can be deleterious to plants in that the availability of nutrients will change. A lower soil pH will allow micronutrients to be more readily leached from the soil profile, eventually resulting in deficiencies of nutrients such as Cu and Zn. Additionally, when the pH of the soil drops much below pH 5, the solubility of Al and Mn can increase to such an extent as to become toxic to most plant growth
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Oct 20, 2013 9:58 am

well I must be on the mend b/c I just spent half the day in the kitchen rather than hitting up the grocery store for a week's worth of prepared meals!

the plan was to do something with wild stewing venison today, so last night i hit up the joy of cooking only to find no recipe for venison stew. you want to try possum, beaver, squirrel, raccoon, they got you covered. diagrams for the right way to skin a rabbit, a squirrel, and so on. also, all sorts of venison recipes... just not stew.

so, i made their beef stew substituting the venison instead. marinated the meat in red wine over night, sautéed it up in onions and pork fat and seasonings, gave it a long slow cook in the oven, added some mushrooms, and on the side i pressure cooked some potatoes and cabbage for a base. hopefully it turns out to be a tasty supper :)
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby Anonymoose » Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:57 pm

Glad you are getting back in the groove. :)

Do you eat barley? A thousand years ago I had a hunters barley soup on a cowboy sleigh ride. It was to die for... I bet it would be great with venison. I had the recipe but ditched it when I went veggie. It had orange zest in it if that helps narrow down the web search. You could easily sneak some kale it that recipe too.
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:05 pm

thanks :)

I do have barley in the house and tend to make beef barley soup with it if anything. with greens of course! more of a winter thing though, so it has been a while since I made it.

the orange zest sounds like a neat twist :D i'll see if I can find the recipe
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Nov 08, 2013 6:29 am

an unusual day yesterday (well sort of). I ate four pieces of bread :S lol
it was the kind of day you just want chicken soup and grilled cheese, so I sprinkled some leeks in a mug of chicken broth and grilled away. followed by 2 slices of toast to help get through the rest of my soup :)
on the plus side, it was bread made with sprouted flour and the sprouting process is known to reduce the amount of gluten.

I went looking for some published science to back that up, and came up with this:

Nutritional improvement of cereals by sprouting
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1 ... nzi700o7q4
Cereal grains form a major source of dietary nutrients for all people, particularly those in the developing countries. However, the nutritional quality of cereal grains and sensory properties of their products are inferior due to lower protein content, deficiency of certain essential amino acids, lower protein and starch availabilities, presence of certain antinutrients, and the coarse nature of the grains. The consumption of sprouted cereals is becoming popular in various parts of the world. Sprouting of grains for a limited period causes increased activities of hydrolytic enzymes, improvement in the contents of certain essential amino acids, total sugars, and B‐group vitamins, and a decrease in dry matter, starch, and antinutrients. The digestibilities of storage proteins and starch are improved due to their partial hydrolysis during sprouting. The magnitude of the nutritional improvement is, however, influenced by the type of cereal, seed quality, sprouting conditions, and it is not large enough to account for in feeding experiments with higher animals. In this review, the available literature concerning the nutritional improvement of cereals by sprouting and utilization of sprouted cereals in traditional and processed foods has been compiled and is critically reviewed.

can't get the full text online, even with access - but, the reference list turned up this title:

Softening of gluten by wheat proteases
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 8/abstract
"Experimental evidence has been obtained to support the hypothesis that gluten softening is a result of peptide bond scission catalysed by proteolytic enzymes. Extensive softening of gluten is observed even though very few peptide bonds are broken. These effects will probably be more noticeable if the wheat from which the flour is milled has begun to germinate."

pretty old studies. hope to be able to find something a little more current.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Nov 24, 2013 12:06 pm

ugh

Status of nutrition education in medical schools
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... rt=classic
"On average, students received 23.9 contact hours of nutrition instruction during medical school (range: 2–70 h)."
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby Fayruz » Sat Nov 30, 2013 1:35 pm

I've got a great recipe for venison stew so if you want it I'll translate it for you. :)
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 30, 2013 1:58 pm

hey that would be great :) thanks
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby Fayruz » Sat Nov 30, 2013 2:28 pm

Ok :)

Ingredients:

- 1 kg of venison
- 0,8 kg of red onions (you can use classic onions but for venison I like red ones better)
- about 0.5 l broth ( I just used leftover beef soup - clear)
- about 0,5 l red wine (not sweet one)
- 80 - 100 grams smoked pancetta/bacon (this is optional but I like the smokey aroma)
- 1 tablespoon of powdered red paprika (I don't know where are you from so maybe you will have a hard time finding it, you can try adding a bit of powdered chilli)
- a pinch of cumin
- one can or two of tomatoes
- 2 laurel leafs (Is that the right translation, sounds weird :D)
- 7 juniper berries
- salt and pepper
- a few tablespooons of oil (I use olive oil)

The procedure :D

Peel the onions and dice them, slice venison in cubes...take a large pot put in it the oil and wait until it gets hot, add onions and mix until they are translucent (they must not get brown). In the meantime dice the smoked pancetta. When the onions are translucent add the pancetta and mix for about a minute. Add meat and stir for few minutes, so the meat seals a bit. Add the tomatoes, mix. Add the wine and the soup/broth, mix. Add all the remaining spices and bring to a boil. Lower the temperature so it simmers and cook for about 3 - 4 hours. You will see that the beef changes colour and start to thicken. The time of cooking depends on the meat really so it could be shorter but this is the kind of stew that I think tastes best after 4 hours. If needed add soup and/or wine. In the end try it and add salt and pepper if needed. Some people use flour for thickening but I don't like it as sometimes you than get this floury taste.
That's it. :)
If I translated something badly and is not understandable please ask. :)
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 30, 2013 4:28 pm

hey thanks!!

yes i have paprika so that's no problem

and re 'laurel leafs' i might not have known what you meant if i hadn't just used a leaf off my own bay laurel tree to season a batch of soup. :) in local recipes they are just called 'bay leaves'

OO i actually have juniper berries in the spice cupboard too.

thanks again, now i'm excited for my next chance at some venison!!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: MS Nutrition-summary pts 1st post, p.1

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Dec 01, 2013 4:39 pm

issues to be aware of when interpreting your vit d3 lab results:

Issues of standardization and assay-specific clinical decision limits for the measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/2/522.short
Different assays for 25(OH)D will give different results, principally because assays are not currently standardized and because there is no accepted definitive method; however, HPLC is commonly offered as a suitable reference method. The only publication that explored the issue of assay comparison concluded that 25(OH)D concentrations measured by competitive protein binding assay (CPBA) were 80% higher than those measured by HPLC; serum 25(OH)D concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay (DiaSorin; INCSTAR Corp, Stillwater, MN) gave intermediate values (3). However, not all CPBAs are the same, as exemplified by Souberbielle et al (4). Souberbielle et al noted that their in-house CPBA gave values that were 30% lower than those measured with the INCSTAR radioimmunoassay, in contrast with Lips et al (3), who documented the opposite trend. To further increase the complexity of interpretation, an automated CPBA was recently developed, as was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (5). In the international comparison study by Lips et al (3), these issues translated to a 38% difference in values between laboratories. Consequently, it is hardly surprising that, because of a lack of standardization of 25(OH)D assays, different clinical decision limits are proposed by different investigators to define vitamin D sufficiency.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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