I'm making myself a lab rat for n-acetylglucosamine

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

I'm making myself a lab rat for n-acetylglucosamine

Postby Jim_P » Wed Dec 19, 2007 8:49 pm

NOTE: Below this messege I've posted some very interesting information about a certain strain of Glucosamine that has dramatically helped mice with the animal model of MS. Since there are no human trials going on at the moment for this, I'm gonna do it to myself. Clinical studies move as slowly as my bowel movements. I'm not gonna sit around and wait.

I found this specifial glucosamine (n-acetyl) variety at ultimateglucosamine.com

They have a link of one distributer.

Today I just got two jars of Ultimate Glubosamine (n-acetylglucosamine form) in the mail. The same variety given to those mice. I could not find this ANYWHERE else but the website I mentioned above. This is my first day trying it.

I have mixed one teaspoon (as directed) in my tea tonight (tasted quite good) and have consumed it. The only mild side effect I've noticed thus far is feeling a tiny bit anxious and a little hyper. That is passing now.

I plan on upping my dosage to two teaspoons a day after a week of trying the recommended amount... that is unless I have any adverse effects to this.

I will keep you all posted on this and let you know if I start urinating again LOL!

But seriously, I will keep you posted on my bodies reaction to this and if I see any improvement.

I realize that one person is not exactly a trial study, but I will let you know regardless.

It did say if one is allergic to shelfish to not take it. Thankfully I'm not.


HERE IS THE INFORMATION I FOUND..................website link too http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/70952.php

Glucosamine-Like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes
Main Category: Multiple Sclerosis News
Article Date: 18 May 2007 - 4:00 PDT

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A glucosamine-like dietary supplement has been found to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes mellitus, according to University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers.

In studies on mice, Dr. Michael Demetriou and colleagues with the UC Irvine Center for Immunology found that N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which is similar but more effective than the widely available glucosamine, inhibited the growth and function of abnormal T-cells that incorrectly direct the immune system to attack specific tissues in the body, such as brain myelin in MS and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas in diabetes. Study results appear on the online version of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

"This finding shows the potential of using a dietary supplement to help treat autoimmune diseases," said Demetriou, an assistant professor of neurology, and microbiology and molecular genetics. "Most importantly, we understand how this sugar-based supplement inhibits the cells that attack the body, making metabolic therapy a rational approach to prevent or treat these debilitating diseases."

The UC Irvine study defines how metabolic therapy with the sugar GlcNAc and other related nutrients modifies the growth and autoimmune activitiy of T-cells. Virtually all proteins on the surface of cells, including T-cells, are modified with complex sugars of variable lengths and composition. Recent studies have shown that changes in these sugars are often associated with T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmune disease.

In mouse models of both MS and type 1 diabetes, Demetriou and colleages found that GlcNAc prevented this hyperactivity and autoimmune response by increasing sugar modifications to the T-cell proteins. This therapy normalized T-cell function and prevented development of paralysis in MS and high blood glucose levels in type 1 diabetes.

This study comes on the heels of others showing the potential of GlcNAc in humans. One previous clinical study reported that 8 of 12 children with treatment-resistant autoimmune inflammatory bowel disease improved significantly following two years of treatment with GlcNAc. No significant adverse side effects were noted.

"Together, these findings identify metabolic therapy using dietary supplements such as GlcNAc as potential treatments for autoimmune diseases." Demetriou said. "Excitement for this treatment strategy stems from the novel mechanism for affecting T-cell function and autoimmunity and the availability and simplicity of its use. However, additional studies in humans will be required to assess the full potential of this therapeutic approach."

Autoimmune diseases such as MS and type 1 diabetes mellitus result from poorly understood interactions between inherited genetic risk and environmental exposure. MS results in neurological dysfunction, while uncontrolled blood glucose in type 1 diabetes can lead to damage of multiple organs.

----------------------------
Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release.
----------------------------

Ani Grigorian, Sung-Uk Lee, Wenqiang Tian, I-Ju Chen and Guoyan Gao of UC Irvine and Richard Mendelsohn and James W. Dennis of the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute in Toronto participated in the study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Wadsworth Foundation and the Canadian Institutes for Health Research.

About the University of California, Irvine: The University of California, Irvine is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Founded in 1965, UCI is among the fastest-growing University of California campuses, with more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students and about 1,800 faculty members. The second-largest employer in dynamic Orange County, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion. For more UCI news, visit http://www.today.uci.edu/.

Contact: Tom Vasich
University of California - Irvine
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Postby cheerleader » Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:52 am

Hi Jim-

I'd urge some caution about N-A-G...
We've discussed this supplement on the boards before. I had my husband on it (dx MS 3/07), until learning that this supplement is a precursor to hyaluronic acid production- he stopped taking it-

Hyaluronic acid prevents oligodendrocytes from repairing the damaged myelin I was of the impression people with MS may not want more hyaluronic acid. So, I think it's hard to determine if N-A-G might or might not be a good thing.

http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-4460-nag.html

Please read our thread. Whatever you decide, I wish you health and answers in your search-
best,
AC
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Glucosamine caution

Postby lyndacarol » Thu Dec 20, 2007 10:11 am

Somewhere I read that people taking glucosamine were more likely than the general population to develop diabetes (Type 2, I assume because I can't remember the details precisely).

As the site's resident "insulin girl" and since these glucosamines are sugar-based supplement, I urge caution in their use. Anything that ramps up insulin secretion is not a good thing for heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, maybe even MS!
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Postby gwa » Thu Dec 20, 2007 10:27 am

Studies in mice rarely translate over to humans, so unless you plan to morph into a mouse, you might think again about taking this supplement until human trials are done.


gwa
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Postby SarahLonglands » Thu Dec 20, 2007 4:42 pm

Ask Notasperfectasyou how his wife got on with the stuff before you do attempt to morph into mouse, because she is a human being.

Sarah
Last edited by SarahLonglands on Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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well

Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:03 pm

and rebif can cause liver problems and tysabri and cause a brain infection and copaxone can cause perminant scaring of the skin.

I get my blood suger checked regularly, so I'm not too concerned.
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who's mouse are you routing for??

Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:16 pm

As far as this NAG thing is concerned... it's another "mouse" study. So who's mouse do you trust.... If these other mice in another study were given glucosamine, then why didn't they develop NAG?

read up about mice and NAG

Further investigation revealed that the tremors were associated with the loss of myelin sheaths on nerve cells, very similar to the myelin loss associated with MS and other neurological diseases, as well as in premature infants. In addition, Sherman's lab found large amounts of hyaluronic acid (HA), a carbohydrate, in the brains of these mice. A comparison to brain tissue of deceased human MS patients also revealed heightened levels of HA, apparently caused by the increased presence of CD44 -- something which had never been noted before. It was at this point that Sherman contacted Bebo, who had been studying an MS-like disease in mice for many years, and they began a collaboration to study how HA accumulated in regions of the nervous system where myelin had been destroyed.

"These investigations revealed that oligodendrocytes, which are cells that form myelin in the brain, were prevented from repairing the damaged myelin when there were elevated levels of HA," explained Bebo. "By studying another mouse model in my lab, we made the connection between heightened levels of HA -- specifically a high-molecular weight version of HA -- and myelin loss in an MS-like disease in mice. We also identified the cells that were making the HA and determined that HA accumulation was linked to an overabundance of the CD44 protein."
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Glucosamine again

Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:49 pm

To all the people who poo-poo Glucosamine.... Do you ever consider what you're putting in your body when the trusted doctor pumps you full of solumedrol? Do you know what "that" can do to you? Not to mention thoughts of suicide? Oh yeah, I've been there.

I'd ride on an extract from shellfish before I ever touch those nasty chemicals again!
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Postby cheerleader » Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:13 pm

Hi Jim-
Sorry for any misunderstandings-
No one is poo-pooing glucosamine-
we just wanted to fill you in on this specific form of glucosamine called N-A-G (NAG is not a disease, it's an acronym for n-acetyl glucosamine), because we all look out for each other on these boards, and we were concerned with how this supplement could raise someone's hyaluronic acid.

You're absolutely right- there are plusses and minuses to every single treatment available. Whatever works for you.

best,
AC
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to Notasperfectasyou

Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:39 pm

A friend of yours just implied that your wife had problems with n-acetyl... I searhed this forum and saw your wrote:

"I can't know for sure, but I have to wonder if this stuff is associated with Kim's current exaserbation."

Did she notice any improvement in the beginning of taking it and then got flare ups later?

I've been taking it for two days and have had dramatic improvements, already in my body. I can't begin to describe the level of energy and some normal skin sensation that is coming back.

Not to mention my cognitive response is much sharper and my mood has improved greatly.

I can't see how this stuff can be bad for my MS when I'm already feeling improvement.

It is really a bummer to hear people say that it is a no no when I haven't felt this good in about 5 years.
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Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:46 pm

oops.... sorry :P I should have mentioned that messege was for Notasperfectasyou.

I'm interested to know your findings with experimenting with the glucosamine in your wife's diet. Please read above.

Sorry to everyone for sounding crabby about this, I'm just finding it hard to believe that something that makes me feel normal and wonderful again is bad for my MS.

my mind doesn't want to ignore these cautions, but my improving body does :?
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Postby Jim_P » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:49 pm

heh, I'm posting again. my fingers are full of life.

This is off topic, but I wanted to mention that there is one supplement that has played hell with my MS in the past. That is vitamin B1 and/or B complex vitamins . Every time I used to take that my hands would go number than numb. I always thought the B vitamins were essential to a healthy nervous system, but that stuff scared the pants off of me.
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Late

Postby notasperfectasyou » Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:26 am

Late is better than never.

Kim is off NAG right now. I'm glad to hear that it's working for you. The issue might be about dosage. Kim was taking 750 mg per day.

I'd like to know more about how this is working out for you, what else you are taking and quantities.

I came back to this issue because I wondered about it in relationship to the ABX regimin that Kim is doing now. I'm still not convinced that this is a good idea, but I'd like to know if there is a small group here at TIMS that is seeing benefit from it - following a similar protocol.

One the sidelines, Ken
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Postby Cleremond2000 » Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:06 pm

I would also like to hear more of how NAG is fitting in your regime and how you are responding to it. I have a very good friend who has Type I Diabetes who could greatly benefit from it as well if it isn't harmful.
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still taking it?

Postby ladysam » Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:24 am

Just curious if Jim was still taking the supplement and if so, how he's doing today. Have others tried this and had good results too? I'm looking for something to help my son. This last relapse and the solumedrol have really hit him badly. There has to be something better. :?:
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