Bladder Spasms, please help

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Mar 02, 2008 12:33 pm

to clarify, i get the impression that natural calm is one of those more easily absorbed preparations. i tried to get more detail off the site but i'm kind of researching and writing a paper at the same time here and didn't get too determined!
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9096
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Mar 02, 2008 2:18 pm

an interesting side note, word to the wise lol
magnesium appears to be part of a good ol' hangover cure. a few other nutrients also depleted "day-after" apparently[/quote]
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9096
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Postby Jim_P » Sun Mar 02, 2008 3:05 pm

Jimmy - I'm an ignorant Internet user! :oops:

I wrote Cure's name there for your message.

I recall I took 2 before I went to bed one time and had some pretty bad nightmares, but it could be a coinsidence, beause I am known to have really bad dreams
User avatar
Jim_P
Family Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Mar 02, 2008 8:51 pm

's okay i figured it out :)

well maybe try again... i haven't heard any reports of nightmares resulting from magnesium before now!

okay sometimes these searches just come up with some really odd results:
googling on magnesium and nightmare yields this

http://inventorspot.com/articles/japan_ ... cycle_5887[url]

actually also i found that B1 and magnesium are supposed to be useful *against* nightmares. calcium too. not having success tracking down a journal article for those 3 things linked with nightmare though, either together or individually.[/url]
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9096
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Postby Jim_P » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:04 am

Never had magnesium or zinc tested. Aren't they only semi-important in diet?

What happens if you don't get enough?
User avatar
Jim_P
Family Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:00 pm

Postby Jim_P » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:26 am

Jimmy-

Just looked at the bottle of Magnesium pills. They are one a day 250. I wonder if it would hurt to take three a day

I'm not generally afraid of taking supplements, but I'm on so many now I'm a little hesitant to mix a bunch

Also trying that MSM stuff that someone swears by on this forum.

The MS hug seems to be not as often as it used to be, but there are weeks where I don't even want to get out of bed
User avatar
Jim_P
Family Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:00 pm

Postby CureOrBust » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:33 am

Jim_P wrote:Hmmmm, I'll give it a go. It may just make me suck it back up though, we shall see...
For me, it can make me empty even when I had no inkling before I bounced. I use it every night to ensure i am empty before I go to bed. That way I go the whole night without having to awake for a toilet trip.

I had a friend that said running at the gym made her do No 2's. Never had that effect on me but I could see how it may also work.
User avatar
CureOrBust
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2924
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 2:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby Jim_P » Mon Mar 03, 2008 9:12 am

I honestly don't think I can jump at this point. I tried it and about fell over

Can't run anymore unless I'm holding on to a railing, and can't do so for more than 20 seconds.
User avatar
Jim_P
Family Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:00 pm

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Mar 03, 2008 9:35 am

hi jim i don't think it would do you any harm to try three per day and back off to two if you end up on the toilet too much.

i hear it's best to take mg between meals, or at bedtime. taking mg pills one at a time throughout the day is also recommended.

i hear you about the tons of pills thing. when i was at my sickest i was up close to 30 per day. now i'm being a terrible slacker, by comparison. what is your daily regimen and amounts lately? do you take any pharmaceuticals? or just neutraceuticals?

so, zinc importance, here goes: (i haven't forgotten magnesium but this post will be long enough ;) )
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/cc/zinc.html
Zinc is an essential mineral that is found in almost every cell. It stimulates the activity of approximately 100 enzymes, which are substances that promote biochemical reactions in your body (1,2). Zinc supports a healthy immune system (3,4), is needed for wound healing (5)...
http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... pageid=653
Zinc is an essential trace element. It is one of the most important of the trace elements needed by the body. Of the many hundreds of protein enzymes present in the body, which allow its chemistry to work, zinc is required by over two hundred of them. It can thus be seen how a deficiency of zinc can affect so many different functions.
Zinc is also important in the production of prostaglandins (PGs). PGs are vital to numerous body functions including, for example: the function of the immune system; the expression and control of inflammation; skin and wound healing; function of the heart and cardiovascular system; absorption of various minerals; body temperature control
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/cc/zinc.html
Zinc deficiency most often occurs when zinc intake is inadequate or poorly absorbed, when there are increased losses of zinc from the body... Medical doctors who suspect a zinc deficiency will consider risk factors such as inadequate caloric intake, alcoholism, digestive diseases... The immune system is adversely affected by even moderate degrees of zinc deficiency. Severe zinc deficiency depresses immune function (27)
http://www.internethealthlibrary.com/He ... estyle.htm
MS patients are reported to have low levels of zinc which is a vital nutrient. It is also interesting that MS is more common in inland regions than in coastal areas where soils tend to be richer in zinc and fresh seafoods are eaten.
http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... pageid=653
It has been observed that those suffering with any of the auto-immune diseases (such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis); atopic problems (allergy, eczema, asthma or migraine); or many of the inflammatory diseases (such as osteo-arthritis, ME or irritable bowel syndrome), have a consistent, and often severe, zinc deficiency, which is greatly benefited by a programme of zinc replacement therapy.

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... pageid=653
Zinc supplements in MS will increase both energy and vitality, increase muscle strength, improve sleep and prevent fatigue. Perhaps in company with vanadium, another common mineral deficiency in MS, which contributes to the occurrence of depression, it will also prevent this distressing symptom.

Zinc only made it onto my personal radar in the last few months. I had never had it tested previously over the 2+ years since my dx. at my lab, the normal range is shown as 11.5-18.5. My level was 8.6 on Nov 30 2007, so I'm definitely working on that now. I have 50mg pills which I take twice a day. i have a second lab requisition for another test to make sure i don't get too much.

finally, some abstract excerpts of interest:

Divergent effects of zinc depletion in brain vs non-brain endothelial cells
Dietary zinc deficiency is common in developing as well as developed countries. Our results suggest the presence of specific mechanisms to counteract zinc deficiency at the BBB, likely involving HBMEC junctional complexes. Understanding the mechanisms involved in this unique response might provide means to modulate the BBB dysfunction associated with neurological disorders such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Impact of zinc supplementation on intestinal permeability
One hundred eleven children with AD (acute diarrhoea) and 190 with PD (persistent diarrhoea) aged between 3 and 24 months received, randomly and blind to the investigators, either an elemental zinc supplement of 5 mg/kg body wt/day or placebo in multivitamin syrup for 2 weeks while intestinal permeability and, biochemical and anthropometric markers were serially monitored. The permeability test was administered as an oral dose of 5 g lactulose/l g mannitol in a 20-ml solution followed by a 5-h urine collection... Two-week zinc supplementation significantly reduced lactulose excretion in both AD and PD, whereas the change in mannitol excretion and L/M was similar between study groups in both studies. Changes in lactulose excretion were significantly influenced by zinc supplementation in children with E. coli, Shigella sp., and Campylobacter jejuni stool isolates.
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9096
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Previous

Return to Regimens

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service