Reversing Endothelial Dysfunction

Tell us what you are using to treat your MS-- and how you are doing.

Postby cheerleader » Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:48 pm

Thanks for the link, Patient...
Yeah, I'd seen that study on quercetin + interferons. Zamboni often collaborates with the neurology dept at SUNY Buffalo on his research.

You know I'm a big fan of quercetin? (not so much interferons) It's an amazing super antioxidant (not another big pharma drug) and taken with EGCG is responsible for keeping my hubby awake thru the whole day. No small feat for him!
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby mrhodes40 » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:24 pm

immunomodulatory effects of salbutamol...but it was probably the vasodilation response


Yes I agree with your assessment.

ratio of cell migration mediator MMP-9, and its inhibitor, TIMP-1 were assessed in the culture supernatants. Quercetin reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of PBMC and modulated the level of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha released by PBMC in the culture supernatants
from the paper X linked

Note that those things impacted are also things present in venous ulcer as well as MS lesions.

Clinical studies indicate that buckwheat tea, which contains
high amounts of rutin (quercetin) is useful in the treatment of chronic
venous insufficiency (CVI).9 A German placebo-controlled,
double-blind study showed that treatment of CVI withbuckwheat herb (Fagopyrum esculentum) tea is safe and
could prevent further leg edema development in patients with
CVI.9

from here

But you already knew that Cheer I know, but every time we see these CVI connections it makes me feel a little thrill.
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Postby cheerleader » Tue Mar 31, 2009 2:08 pm

WHOO HOO!
Just got the call from Jeff's GP. All of his blood work was perfect, spot on normal for liver enzymes, SED rate, white and red cells, B12, D, zinc and iron. Don't have the numbers in front of me, but will post.

I think the program works. (For him, at least.) This is the first time all the numbers are great. He's been doing well. We're really excited and very thankful!
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Thu Apr 02, 2009 2:22 pm

A new paper to go with the Endothelial Health Program
Venous Issues in Multiple Sclerosis: New Technologies Allow for a New Paradigm

link
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
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http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Tue Apr 07, 2009 11:02 am

I've written about the importance of vitamin D in endothelial health. Here's a new study from Missouri University showing how a vitamin D deficiency leads to increased inflammation in healthy women-

Increased concentrations of serum TNF-α, an inflammatory marker, were found in women who had insufficient vitamin D levels. This study is the first to find an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and concentrations of TNF-α in a healthy, non-diseased population. This may explain the vitamin's role in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases, including heart disease, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

"The findings reveal that low vitamin D levels negatively impact inflammation and immune response, even in healthy women," said Catherine Peterson, assistant professor in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences. "Increased inflammation normally is found in people with obesity or chronic diseases; a small decrease in vitamin D levels may aggravate symptoms in people who are sick."


link

Vitamin D is a terrific anti-inflammatory, and it's as easy as getting 15 minutes of sun and taking a supplement. Jeff takes 6,000mg a day, and spends at least a half hour getting some rays every day. It helps decrease inflammatory pain, and he sleeps better, too.

AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Tue Apr 14, 2009 7:10 am

Jeff's really having good results with bromelain. He takes it with his quercetin and EGCG supps.


Bromelain is a mixture of protein-digesting (proteolytic) enzymes found in pineapples (Ananas comosus ). Pineapple has been used for centuries in Central and South America to treat indigestion and reduce inflammation. Bromelain, which is derived from the stem and juice of the pineapple, was first isolated from the pineapple plant in the late 1800s. It is approved by the German Commission E to treat swelling and inflammation following surgery, particularly sinus surgery.

Bromelain can be useful in treating a wide range of conditions, but it is particularly effective in reducing inflammation associated with infection and injuries.


Ursula had mentioned to me on the natural thread that there's a doc in Germany who uses bromelain instead of steroids to relieve inflammation in his MS patients. It's really helping him!
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby peekaboo » Tue Apr 14, 2009 2:09 pm

cheer - Of all the items you list on your endo program i don't use Salvia i thought there was only the psychodelic type (i lived thru the 70's want to live now) and i have read there is a different type. What does this do and where do you get this so i may ad this to my regimine.

have you heard of butchers broom an herb to help circulation? I am adding that to my collection..
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Postby cheerleader » Tue Apr 14, 2009 5:09 pm

peekaboo wrote:cheer - Of all the items you list on your endo program i don't use Salvia i thought there was only the psychodelic type (i lived thru the 70's want to live now) and i have read there is a different type. What does this do and where do you get this so i may ad this to my regimine.

have you heard of butchers broom an herb to help circulation? I am adding that to my collection..


Hi Peekaboo-
Salvia miltiorrhiza is the supplement, Salvia Divinorum is the one you toke :)
Salvia is an anticoagulant, and now that Jeff's coagulation numbers are much better, we've backed off it. He's still on the serrapeptase and nattokinase and bromelain...all proteolytic enzymes which digest protein and aid circulation. Salvia also aids circulation, and is used in Chinese medicine. It's available in most vitamin/health food locations.

Search butcher's broom on the threads using the search function and you'll find lots of info by gibbledygook. She's used it and had success with it.

Hope you're doing well on your supplement regimen. Let me know how it goes!
best,
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:59 am

Have to find a new site to host the endothelial paper....I've used up the capacity at the free site I've been using.

Looks like the venous paper is offline too...bummer.

Will be up and running in a week or so. Sorry for the inconvenience-
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Sat May 02, 2009 12:00 pm

Since Jeff's diagnosis with bilateral jugular vein stenoses at Stanford University....he will be receiving a stent. We'll keep the supplements going at lower dosages.

We'll see how this affects his fatigue and other MS issues. Will keep testing blood to make sure inflammation numbers, liver enzymes, lymphs and all vitamin and nutrient numbers stay normal.

Hopefully, less perfusion and healthy venous flow will result in better energy levels, and perhaps healing.

Will keep all posted.
See CCSVI thread for further details.
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Sun Feb 14, 2010 9:24 am

New research on diesel exhaust, ambient air pollution and progression of atherosclerosis in adults. Story in my local paper caught my eye. Diesel exhaust is a known endothelial disrupter, and exacerbates inflammation and c-reactive protein.

This is the first study in humans to investigate the association between markers of exposure to ambient air pollution and the progression of CIMT (common carotid artery intima-media thickness), an accepted measure of the progression of atherosclerosis [26], [27]. CIMT results from the cumulative atherogenic processes that occur in the artery wall. As such, CIMT progression is associated with future clinical cardiovascular events [26], [28], [29]. Our data indicate that the progression of sub-clinical atherosclerosis correlates with home outdoor air quality, with particularly strong associations among those living along highways. Southern California highways have exceptionally high traffic density (i.e. several hundred-thousand vehicles per day) – several fold higher then on main surface roads – and most highways are designated truck routes. Moreover, trucks are the key source of diesel particles while passenger cars operate primarily with gasoline in North America.


In the CCSVI paradigm, living near a freeway could exacerbate stenosis, by hardening already stressed veins-

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Ad ... ne.0009096

Here's the Endothelial Health Paper from October 2008.

http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=123456602210

cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby cheerleader » Tue Aug 03, 2010 9:49 am

New paper out regarding endothelial disfunction and MS:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20663648

It was this connection that got me searching for the vascular component. I'm glad to see researchers at Louisiana State looking at it. Thanks to Shayk for sending the paper--

There is now an edited version of the Endothelial Health Program at the CCSVI Alliance website. Click under the topic, Helping Yourself, to find it--
http://www.ccsvi.org/

cheer
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Postby daniel » Wed Sep 01, 2010 6:14 pm

Dr. Bernhard H.J. Juurlink has been getting a bit of press lately

Bernhard Juurlink published a hypothesis in 1998 that MS is related to decreased blood flow in the brain and spinal cord.

"It was very difficult to get anyone interested in this idea — the idea was easily testable by, for example, looking for blood flow in white matter in MS patients," Juurlink said in an interview this week. "I tried to first interest clinical colleagues to image brains of MS and non-MS patients, to look at blood flow, with no success."


which lead me to another one his papers oxidative stress in brain and spinal cord injury: suggestions for pharmacological and nutritional management strategies where he recommends supplementation with:

Oxidative stress can be minimized by 1) maintaining reduced-glutathione levels through the administration of cysteine precursors such as N-acetylcysteine and 2) limiting neutrophil invasion by administering platelet-activating factor antagonists such as BN 52021. Aggressive nutritional support following CNS trauma can also contribute to maximizing antioxidant defenses. Furthermore, we suggest that flavonoids such as quercetin have the potential to be therapeutically effective because of their free radical quenching, iron chelating, and anti-inflammatory properties.


(bold emphasis mine)
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Postby Drury » Fri Sep 03, 2010 9:32 am

Thanks Cheer and daniel,

Really interesting. So glad that Dr. Juurlink is getting the press he deserves.

I wonder if anyone is taking any of the supplements he mentioned?

Drury
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Postby cheerleader » Wed Sep 08, 2010 8:41 am

daniel wrote:
Oxidative stress can be minimized by 1) maintaining reduced-glutathione levels through the administration of cysteine precursors such as N-acetylcysteine and 2) limiting neutrophil invasion by administering platelet-activating factor antagonists such as BN 52021. Aggressive nutritional support following CNS trauma can also contribute to maximizing antioxidant defenses. Furthermore, we suggest that flavonoids such as quercetin have the potential to be therapeutically effective because of their free radical quenching, iron chelating, and anti-inflammatory properties.


(bold emphasis mine)


Great to see Juurlink in the press again. He was one of the doctors suggesting blood flow awhile ago.

Both NAC and flavonoids, such as quercetin, are in the endothelial health program. Jeff's been on this program for over 2 years now and doing well. The best flavonoid is EGCG (green tea) which is BBB permeable, and iron chelating. There is a large study at Charite in Berlin on EGCG in MS.

The latest (and simplest) version of the endothelial health program is now available on www.ccsvi.org under "helping myself."
HTH,
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
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