Another story

Discuss stem cells, adult and embryonic, and their therapeutic potential for MS here.

Another story

Postby bromley » Tue Feb 26, 2008 4:14 pm

Sorry, I'm a sucker for these stories.

http://c.moreover.com/click/here.pl?j13 ... 6&w=464753
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Postby sh8un » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:25 pm

Thank you for that. I am so with you. Love these stories. Just some real news instead of people going on about nothing. We really need a chat room. Hint hint...Arron.
NN
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Postby rainer » Tue Feb 26, 2008 7:29 pm

"After five days of chemotherapy to destroy his immune cells, doctors used his own stem cells to rebuild his immune system."

I wonder if the reviewers discuss the question if the stem cell part of this procedure was necessary or not, b/c the 5 days of chemo sounds very revimmunish.
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JAMA stem cell study/article

Postby PointsNorth » Tue Feb 26, 2008 9:22 pm

Hello,

I tried to do a search on the stem cell study on the JAMA site, but I came up with nothing. Would anyone have the link to the JAMA article?

Thanks, PN
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Postby bromley » Wed Feb 27, 2008 2:04 am

Rainer,

I think many of these 'chemo' based approaches are similar - the Bone Marrow Transplantation project in Canada, Reimmune and Campath. In the latter, there is no stem cell infusion but the researchers think that the new cells from the bone marrow which replace the cell which Campath destroys have neurotrophic properties - and that's why there has been some improvement in disability following the treatment.

If you are less worried about some of the risks (which can generally be managed) involved then these treatments offer the prospect of a break / remission from the disease.

Ian
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Postby bromley » Wed Feb 27, 2008 2:12 am

Here is another story. But the really interesting bit is this guy has had MS for 50 years! Is that a world record.

This must be a target for GWA who has had MS for c35 years.

http://c.moreover.com/click/here.pl?j13 ... 4&w=464753
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Postby gwa » Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:24 am

Thanks for the link, Bromley. This is the first stem cell MS therapy I have seen that dealt with patients that have had the disease for a long period of time.

I wish the article had described the man's symptoms before he started the procedure. some people may have it for 50 years and not be very debilitated, while others may be in terrible shape.

Has anyone on this board with SPMS or PPMS checked out this type of therapy? It seems a bit odd to me that Northwestern started the trials five years ago, and the procedure is not mainstream yet.

gwa
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Postby robbie » Wed Feb 27, 2008 11:14 am

From the article!
Five years later, Mr. Goudy says, "I have no symptoms of MS. I do no treatment for MS, I do no shots."

Either this person with ms for 50 years had no damage which is bullshit or this whole story just like many are shit and not worth the paper they are written on. I have tried to bite my tongue but when I see statements like this that they assume to be creditable enough to put into print it just pisses me off. We are bombarded by stories and therapies of false hope, it's fine to research chemo and others like it but don't use statements like the above to express results of what sounds like a f#$king miracle
Had ms for over 19 years now.
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Different Version

Postby gwa » Wed Feb 27, 2008 3:50 pm

This version of Bromley's story says the same man was diagnosed in 1995 and now coaches an ice hockey tea.

gwa

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm?fuseact ... ageid=1405

After Barry Goudy was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1995, he began losing feeling in his left leg, then his vision started to go.

"You sit and you cry and you wonder why you and then I went back to my neurologist and said tell me how I can fight this," he said.

Barry enrolled in a clinical trial in 2003. After five days of chemotherapy to destroy his immune system doctors used his own stem cells to rebuild it.

"I have no symptoms of MS. I do no treatment for MS, I do no shots," he said.

Researchers at Northwestern University reviewed the outcomes of about 2,500 cases. They found that adult stem cells appear to be putting some patients with autoimmune diseases in remission and are offering new hope to heart attack patients.

"It's a whole new approach to these diseases. Rather than just surgery or drugs that you can use, a cellular approach that seems in many different studies to be benefiting the patient," said Dr. Richard Burt.

The transplant appears to be very safe.

"There's very low risk. Less than 1 percent mortality from the procedure," said Dr. Burt.

Barry now leads an active lifestyle, and even coaches an ice hockey team.

"I've had five years of good life. Five years. If I didn't do the transplant I would probably be in a wheelchair today," he said.

He knows there are no guarantees about how long his remission might last, but he says he's living proof adult stem cell transplants do work.

Some of the earliest work on adult stem cells and MS was done in Seattle. A study is now underway at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Details of the clicnical trial, which is still recruiting can be found here.

Source: King TV © 2008 KING-TV (27/02/08
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Postby rainer » Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:19 pm

bromley wrote:Rainer,

I think many of these 'chemo' based approaches are similar - the Bone Marrow Transplantation project in Canada, Reimmune and Campath. In the latter, there is no stem cell infusion but the researchers think that the new cells from the bone marrow which replace the cell which Campath destroys have neurotrophic properties - and that's why there has been some improvement in disability following the treatment.


Is Campath given over several days or is it a monthly infusion?

One really important question for patients I think will be if Tysarbi or other MS drugs will disqualify or endanger you in taking these chemotherapy drugs down the line, b/c in the trial referenced above "natalizumab"/Ty makes you ineligible.
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Postby Lyon » Wed Feb 27, 2008 9:13 pm

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Last edited by Lyon on Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby rainer » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:17 pm

It seems like they should be watching for how long it takes the immune system to recover. If stem cells speed that process I can see how they might be useful.

I did notice on that Campath page that they are also going to do a phase 3 trial for people who have taken other MS drugs in the past, which is good. I wonder if Ty will be included.
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Postby Lyon » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:43 pm

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Postby dignan » Thu Feb 28, 2008 11:28 pm

Bob, I think the thing about the autologous stem cell transplants that was risky wasn't the process of taking bone marrow and reintroducing the stem cells to the body, I think it had to do with the drugs they used in the early days to do the equivalent of what HiCy does. Since they established a safer set of drugs to knock-out the immune system, they have been fatality free. I couldn't even guess how this newer, safer regimen compares to HiCy in terms of risk. But I agree with you that if HiCy does the trick, all the extra drugs/steps seem unnecessary.

Overall, transplant related mortality (TRM) was 5.3% and was restricted to the period 1995-2000, with no further TRM reported since then. Busulphan-based regimens were significantly associated with TRM.


http://msj.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/12/6/814
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Postby mom10789 » Fri Feb 29, 2008 4:44 am

i've read alot these last few weeks about just about everything
stem cell had a really rough beginning but it doesn't seem as risky as it once was
i'm also just learning about hycy, and don't you need to go right on copaxon
i realize stem cells are a whole lot riskier and more invasive but it just it seems in both cases after the chemo the body needs a little jump start
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