Embryonic Stem Cells Reduce M.S. symptoms <:3

Discuss stem cells, adult and embryonic, and their therapeutic potential for MS here.

Embryonic Stem Cells Reduce M.S. symptoms <:3

Postby rainer » Wed Sep 10, 2008 3:32 pm

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/120874.php

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi ... ne.0003145

Hadassah University Hospital and Hadasit, the technology transfer company of Hadassah Medical Organization, announced that scientists at Hadassah University Hospital have discovered a new application for human embryonic stem cells. They have demonstrated for the first time that transplanted neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells can reduce the clinical symptoms in animals with a form of multiple sclerosis.

The findings of the study are published in an article titled "Neuroprotective Effect of Transplanted Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis" in the Scientific Journal of PLoS One, a new, high-impact, peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication. Click here to access the article.

The data presented in the report are the result of a long-term collaboration between Professor Tamir Ben Hur, director of the Neurological Department at Hadassah Hospital and Professor Benjamin Reubinoff, director of the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Center at Hadassah Hospital. Ms. Michal Aharonowiz and Dr. Ofira Einstein both from Hadassah, as well as Professor Hans Lassmann from the University of Vienna also contributed.

"Human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors were transplanted into the brains of mice with an experimental form of MS. The grafted human cells integrated in the mice brains and migrated towards the sites of inflammation. They suppressed the inflammatory process in the brain, and consequently protected the animals from demyelination and nerve cell extension (axonal) injury, which are the pathological hallmarks of MS," said Professor Benjamin Reubinoff.

Multiple sclerosis, the most common cause of neurological disabilities in young adults, is caused by an inflammatory reaction of the patient's own immune system against the myelin sheath that envelops the nerve processes. The destruction of myelin leads to the degeneration and loss of nerve cells and permanent neurological disabilities. MS affects 2.5 million people worldwide.

"We believe that the encouraging therapeutic effects in the rodent model of MS justify moving ahead to clinical studies. We also anticipate that the anti-inflammatory effect demonstrated in the pre-clinical study may be combined in the future with the use of other human embryonic stem cell derived neural cells to repair the myelin in the brain," said Professor Reubinoff.
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So MS has helped the little mice....AGAIN!!

Postby codefellow » Wed Nov 19, 2008 11:12 am

They have demonstrated for the first time that transplanted neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells can reduce the clinical symptoms in animals with a form of multiple sclerosis.
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So how many times does this make that MS has been successfully treated in the little rodents? Six, eight, twenty? Doesn't mean a thing.

:cry:
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Postby rainer » Wed Nov 19, 2008 9:23 pm

This symbol <:3 means the thread contains mice findings.

Yes, we all want positive findings in human trials. But without positive findings in rodents, that becomes LESS likely.
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Postby mrhodes40 » Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:38 pm

OOOhhhh! that's nice info. I esp liked
They suppressed the inflammatory process in the brain, and consequently protected the animals from demyelination and nerve cell extension (axonal) injury, which are the pathological hallmarks of MS

This fact of stem cells (even your own adult ones) has been shown before; it is inflammation suppressive. It is one of the logics behind the idea that MS could be treated with stem cells even if it did not regrow nerves. I imagine that such a thing would need repeat treatment, kind of like getting tysabri on schedule, only --let's hope-- with less side effect.

It makes you wonder how much of a "stem cell transplant" in which they had given you chemo first is actually benefit from the stem cells alone; like this, what would happen if you gave half a group the chemo and stems and the other just stems?

I am so plased that this is coming along now! Thanks for posting it! :D
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