How would an abnormal EEG be correlated to MS?

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How would an abnormal EEG be correlated to MS?

Postby priyasharm » Tue Apr 22, 2014 5:12 pm

Hi everyone, I'm a 21-year-old Canadian university student and I'm just looking for some answers. Some brief background about me:
- started having severe spasms around my body when I was a teenager, I didn't think it was a big deal.
- I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 2 in my teenage years. No stressor or trigger, just genetics.
- For the past year I began having extreme stiffness and cramps in arms, hands, and legs. My leg has become so stiff that I wasn't able to move it on many occasions, which is when I initially decided to seek medical attention.
- Chronic lower back pain which occurs during random times and lasts for a week. I am not able to move my leg, move my hips, sit down, get up when this pain kicks in.
- Suffered from black-outs and dizzy spells when I was in grade 8. An MRI, CT, and EEG were conducted and all were normal.
- Extreme numbness and pain in hands, head, arm. Recently a really bad burning sensation along my arm and back -- this has now resided.
- Really bad memory gaps, lack of concentration, "blanking-out", slurring of speech. I also have really bad headaches and migraines which randomly come and go all over my head. I've have always attributed these symptoms to my bipolar disorder and believed they're just a normal part of life.
- I've been vegetarian since birth and although I maintain a very health diet regime, I have assumed that I have some vitamin deficiency. I had two different blood-work done in the past six months; one ordered by my physician and the other by my neurologist. I was told my vitamin levels were 'exceptionally' well, except for my cholesterol which was too high.

When I initially went to my physician my concern was that I had weakness caused by vitamin deficiency. My physcian did my bloodwork however also scheduled me for an EMG as he suspected peripheral neuropathy. My bloodwork as mentioned was fine and my EMG was normal. My neurologist told me he suspected MS and possible epilepsy so he scheduled me for an MRI and EEG. I had my sleep-deprived EEG today and my nurse told me that my EEG was abnormal, however no seizure activity. My neurologist is going to follow-up with me about the details tomorrow, however I was told MS is still be a possibility and the MRI will determine for sure. I am wondering how would abnormal EEG activity be correlated to MS, could it not be something less severe? And I have read a lot about B12 on this forum which has been very helpful as I am a vegetarian, however I am wondering is there something else I should be asking my physician about my b12? I've been taking sub-lingual b12 methylcobalamin almost everyday for about 3-4 years, should I consider getting a b12 injection?

I apologize for the long post and would appreciate any advice from anyone who has been in a similar situation! Thank you!
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Re: How would an abnormal EEG be correlated to MS?

Postby lyndacarol » Tue Apr 22, 2014 6:21 pm

priyasharm wrote:Hi everyone, I'm a 21-year-old Canadian university student and I'm just looking for some answers. Some brief background about me:
- started having severe spas ms around my body when I was a teenager, I didn't think it was a big deal.
- I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 2 in my teenage years. No stressor or trigger, just genetics.
- For the past year I began having extreme stiffness and cramps in arms, hands, and legs. My leg has become so stiff that I wasn't able to move it on many occasions, which is when I initially decided to seek medical attention.
- Chronic lower back pain which occurs during random times and lasts for a week. I am not able to move my leg, move my hips, sit down, get up when this pain kicks in.
- Suffered from black-outs and dizzy spells when I was in grade 8. An MRI, CT, and EEG were conducted and all were normal.
- Extreme numbness and pain in hands, head, arm. Recently a really bad burning sensation along my arm and back -- this has now resided.
- Really bad memory gaps, lack of concentration, "blanking-out", slurring of speech. I also have really bad headaches and migraines which randomly come and go all over my head. I've have always attributed these symptoms to my bipolar disorder and believed they're just a normal part of life.
- I've been vegetarian since birth and although I maintain a very health diet regime, I have assumed that I have some vitamin deficiency. I had two different blood-work done in the past six months; one ordered by my physician and the other by my neurologist. I was told my vitamin levels were 'exceptionally' well, except for my cholesterol which was too high.

When I initially went to my physician my concern was that I had weakness caused by vitamin deficiency. My physcian did my bloodwork however also scheduled me for an EMG as he suspected peripheral neuropathy. My bloodwork as mentioned was fine and my EMG was normal. My neurologist told me he suspected MS and possible epilepsy so he scheduled me for an MRI and EEG. I had my sleep-deprived EEG today and my nurse told me that my EEG was abnormal, however no seizure activity. My neurologist is going to follow-up with me about the details tomorrow, however I was told MS is still be a possibility and the MRI will determine for sure. I am wondering how would abnormal EEG activity be correlated to MS, could it not be something less severe? And I have read a lot about B12 on this forum which has been very helpful as I am a vegetarian, however I am wondering is there something else I should be asking my physician about my b12? I've been taking sub-lingual b12 methylcobalamin almost everyday for about 3-4 years, should I consider getting a b12 injection?

I apologize for the long post and would appreciate any advice from anyone who has been in a similar situation! Thank you!


Welcome to ThisIsMS, Priya. MS is a diagnosis of exclusion; there are LOTS of conditions to rule out.

The extreme numbness in hands and arms is the classic definition of "peripheral neuropathy." You say your physician has done blood work; compare this with the suggestions from the University of Chicago for investigating peripheral neuropathy:
http://peripheralneuropathycenter.uchic ... #bloodtest\

Blood tests

Blood tests are commonly employed to check for vitamin deficiencies, toxic elements and evidence of an abnormal immune response.

Depending on your individual situation, your doctor may request certain laboratory tests to identify potentially treatable causes for neuropathy. These include tests for:
Vitamin B12 and folate levels
Thyroid, liver and kidney functions
Vasculitis evaluation
Oral glucose tolerance test
Antibodies to nerve components (e.g., anti-MAG antibody)
Antibodies related to celiac disease
Lyme disease
HIV/AIDS
Hepatitis C and B
Please note that the first blood test the U of Chicago suggests is for vitamin B12.
Since my ideas revolve around insulin, I think it is a good idea if you request your GP to order a "fasting blood insulin test" (which is NOT the same as a glucose/blood sugar test); the optimal result should be 3 UU/ML or lower range. If it is higher than 3, diet is the only way to bring down.
Wheat/gluten raises blood sugar, which then raises the insulin level. By the way, steroids also result is higher insulin levels.

The Dr. Oz Show featured the author and book, Dr. William Davis and Wheat Belly:
Video Pt 1: http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/are-you-addicted-wheat
In Pt 2 the fact that wheat causes a blood sugar spike GREATER than a Snickers candy bar is pointed out!


Dr. Oz article, "Celiac Disease: The Advantages of a Gluten-Free Diet"
http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/celiac-d ... iet?page=2
"Researchers now believe that Celiac disease may be more common in the United States than previously thought, especially given the high rate of misdiagnosis. There are now reliable blood tests to help your doctor determine if you are a Celiac sufferer. Because Celiac is an autoimmune disease, people with Celiac have abnormally high levels of certain antibodies (anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase). Your doctor can test for these antibody levels and may confirm the diagnosis with an endoscopic tissue sample (which involves using a tiny camera to look at the lining of the intestines.)

A person with any degree of gluten sensitivity (not JUST those with celiac disease) can have neurologic symptoms, such as you describe.

Intestinal damage results in poor nutrient absorption – low levels of magnesium, zinc, vitamin B12, even vitamin D3. I hope you have copies of the test results for your own file.

It is good to begin with blood tests of your B12 level (especially since you are a lifelong vegetarian), but be aware that there can be a B12 deficiency in the tissues and the blood level may still look good.

"Everything You Want Your Doctor to Know about Vitamin B12"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvEizypoyO0

I highly recommend this 50-minute documentary from the filmmaker Elissa Leonard, featuring Sally Pacholok, RN, BSN & her husband Jeffrey Stuart, D.O. (authors of the book, Could It Be B12? An Epidemic of Misdiagnoses); Lawrence Solomon, M.D., hematologist with Yale Medical School; Ralph Green, M.D., hematologist at UC Davis; and Donald Jacobsen, PhD, at the Cleveland Clinic (Homocysteine Research Lab).

@1:23 "The neurological manifestations well precede the hematological manifestations."

@1:46 "In 1948 scientists isolated a red crystalline pigment and named it vitamin B12. It is a primordial molecule responsible for the health of all the DNA in all our cells. The Framingham Offspring Study suggests 40% of Americans have suboptimal B12."

Signs and Symptoms of B12 Deficiency:
Tingling/Numbness
Sore Mouth or Tongue
Fatigue
Anxiety
Irritability
Depression
Weakness

Abnormal Gait
Mental Impairment
Visual Disturbances
Migraine
Orthostatic Intolerance
Chest Pain
Tachycardia
Difficulty Breathing
Edema
Elevated Homocysteine
Elevated MMA
Stomach and G.I. Problems
Blood Abnormalities
Neurological Lesions
Limb Movement Disorders
Psychosis
Thoughts of Suicide

Even bipolar disorder has been linked to vitamin B12 deficiency.
To my knowledge, an abnormal EEG is not correlated to MS. We wish you all the best. We are here to share our experiences and our opinions.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
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Re: How would an abnormal EEG be correlated to MS?

Postby euphoniaa » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:23 am

priyasharm wrote: My neurologist is going to follow-up with me about the details tomorrow, however I was told MS is still be a possibility and the MRI will determine for sure.
I am wondering how would abnormal EEG activity be correlated to MS, could it not be something less severe?

I've been taking sub-lingual b12 methylcobalamin almost everyday for about 3-4 years, should I consider getting a b12 injection?


Hi priyasharm,

To answer your main question, I don't think an EEG is related to MS at all, but your doctor used it to rule out - or in -- other conditions such as epilepsy. Here's a link and a list from Mayo Clinic:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedu ... c-20014093

An EEG can determine changes in brain activity that may be useful in diagnosing brain disorders, especially epilepsy. An EEG may be helpful to confirm, rule out or provide information that helps with management of the following disorders:
• Epilepsy or other seizure disorder
• Brain tumor
• Head injury
• Brain dysfunction that may have a variety of causes (encephalopathy)
• Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis)
• Stroke
• Sleep disorders
• Memory impairment


It seems that you have a variety of complaints, some of which don't sound like MS, so you may have more than one issue to be identified and treated. And another note -- I know that B12, like Vitamin D, is one of the current favorite topics, with many suggesting to bombard your body with them both :smile: (like that will cure us all...) but in answer to your question, be careful about overdoing supplements. I've personally had more severe problems from supplements than from MS itself.

I found out in the last year that, after doing sublingual B12 for a couple of years like you did that tests show that I'm apparently drowning myself in it! My levels are still way over the top after months of cutting it back out of my regimen.

Good luck today and be sure to discuss all your questions with your doctor.
Dx'd with MS & HNPP (hereditary peripheral neuropathy) 7/03 but must have had MS for 30 yrs before that. I've never taken meds for MS except 1 yr experiment on LDN. (I found diet, exercise, sleep, humor, music help me the most.)
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Re: How would an abnormal EEG be correlated to MS?

Postby euphoniaa » Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:45 am

priyasharm wrote: I had two different blood-work done in the past six months; one ordered by my physician and the other by my neurologist. I was told my vitamin levels were 'exceptionally' well, except for my cholesterol which was too high.

My bloodwork as mentioned was fine and my EMG was normal.


P.S. I see you've had quite a bit of bloodwork done, but I've found that the vitamin levels aren't part of the usual bloodwork and I've had to specifically request levels for Vit D & B12 as well as other minerals. And... that means it costs a fortune!! They even have to send the zinc test off to Mayo! Luckily... (ha-ha) I was hospitalized twice in the last couple years (totally NON-MS related), where they could just lump the bloodwork into the hospital bill so I got them to throw those vitamin tests in for me.
Dx'd with MS & HNPP (hereditary peripheral neuropathy) 7/03 but must have had MS for 30 yrs before that. I've never taken meds for MS except 1 yr experiment on LDN. (I found diet, exercise, sleep, humor, music help me the most.)
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