MS in Iran: A Demographic Study of 8,000 Patients

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MSUK
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MS in Iran: A Demographic Study of 8,000 Patients

Post by MSUK » 8 years ago

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Abstract
Background: Iran was formerly considered to be located in a low prevalence zone for multiple sclerosis (MS). During the last decade the number of patients has increased. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of MS in the capital city of the country.

Methods: We re-evaluated the files of all patients who had registered at the Iranian Multiple Sclerosis Society during a 10-year period.... Read More - http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseact ... ageid/2325
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/

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hwebb
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what happened ~ 30 years ago in Iran ?

Post by hwebb » 8 years ago

I find this report on the increase in MS in Iran to be quite interesting - particularly when considered with the perinatal vitamin D hypothesis (that perhaps a vitamin D deficiency in the first 5 weeks of fetal development leads to abnormal... vascular development).

I looked back into Iranian history ...what happened about 30 years ago (cause the people who are being diagnosed now are around 30).
Guess what? The Islamic Revolution happened.

Women (expectant mothers and all) suddenly conformed with a traditional dress code, which involved covering up most skin. Could this social phenomena be adding to vitamin D deficiency (which is considered a risk factor to being predisposed to MS and MS relapses).

Similarly, in Australia...there has been increased use of sunscreen, creating an invisible cloak. Vitamin D deficiency is common in Australia, even in Southern Queensland - which gets plenty of sunlight. Social behaviour effectively leading to an increased risk of developing a vascular abnormality?

I'm not saying to avoid traditional dress, or sunscreen. Vitamin D can be obtained from sunlight to the skin, certain foods (shitake mushrooms and atlantic salmon have high quantities), or from a vitamin supplement.

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