pediatric MS

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Taurus
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pediatric MS

Post by Taurus » 4 years ago

I have always seen people talking/ writing about environmental factors like infection with a typical virus, stress, less sunshine etc etc as a possible cause of MS. But do we realize that 2-5% of MS patients are actually children. Any comments????

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jimmylegs
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Re: pediatric MS

Post by jimmylegs » 4 years ago

obviously, i'd consider lower nutrient inputs.. can lead to birth defects as well.

2012: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-d ... [quote]hey lc, i love that one. infusion of a fresh, nutrient-packed happy liver :D

Determination of copper, manganese and zinc in human liver
http://www.springerlink.com/content/h4l52g7703671346/
Hepatic zinc levels averaged 118.3 ± 44.4 g/g and ranged from 38.5 to 231.3 g/g.

Zinc content and distribution in the newborn liver
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8856577
The mean zinc concentration in the newborn liver was 639 micrograms/g of dry tissue (dt). A striking interindividual variability in zinc liver stores was observed; the hepatic concentration of the metal ranged from 300 to 1,400 micrograms/g dt.

i think that last tidbit could likely be correlated with maternal zinc status[/quote]
2008: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-d ... ]Remission of multiple sclerosis post-liver transplantation.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15595263

Improvement of multiple sclerosis on tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil after liver transplantation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17937765[/quote]
the low nutrient status could affect immune system resistance to infections including bacterial and viral; resistance to stress (which further depletes nutrients, whether physical or emotional); ability to maximize synthesis of calcitriol from dietary and endogenous cholecalciferol; edit: and ability to handle and process toxins.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

want2bike
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Re: pediatric MS

Post by want2bike » 4 years ago

The babies environment is the same environment as the mother. The mother body may be full of toxins. The mother body is larger and may be able to handle the mercury, formaldehyde, aluminum, antifreeze, and foreign DNA in the flu shot but the baby may not. Toxins are more hazardous to developing fetus. That is why we have all the sick children.

http://www.sciences360.com/index.php/th ... als-28093/

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lyndacarol
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Re: pediatric MS

Post by lyndacarol » 4 years ago

jimmylegs wrote:obviously, i'd consider lower nutrient inputs.. can lead to birth defects as well.

2012: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-d ... [quote]hey lc, i love that one. infusion of a fresh, nutrient-packed happy liver :D

Determination of copper, manganese and zinc in human liver
http://www.springerlink.com/content/h4l52g7703671346/
Hepatic zinc levels averaged 118.3 ± 44.4 g/g and ranged from 38.5 to 231.3 g/g.

Zinc content and distribution in the newborn liver
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8856577
The mean zinc concentration in the newborn liver was 639 micrograms/g of dry tissue (dt). A striking interindividual variability in zinc liver stores was observed; the hepatic concentration of the metal ranged from 300 to 1,400 micrograms/g dt.

i think that last tidbit could likely be correlated with maternal zinc status
2008: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-d ... ]Remission of multiple sclerosis post-liver transplantation.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15595263

Improvement of multiple sclerosis on tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil after liver transplantation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17937765[/quote]
the low nutrient status could affect immune system resistance to infections including bacterial and viral; resistance to stress (which further depletes nutrients, whether physical or emotional); ability to maximize synthesis of calcitriol from dietary and endogenous cholecalciferol; edit: and ability to handle and process toxins.[/quote]

One other possibility is that vitamin B 12 is stored in the liver. A deficiency of vitamin B 12 can manifest as neurological symptoms (even before hematologic symptoms appear). Perhaps a new liver brought in a new supply of vitamin B 12 and improved the "MS" symptoms, at least temporarily (until the vitamin B12 level was reduced again to a deficiency). It would be nice to have an update to know how the liver recipient is doing today.

Is it obvious that I have begun reading the book, Could It Be B12? by Sally Pacholok, RN, BSN & her husband Jeffrey Stuart, D.O.?
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"

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