Significant changes in MS brain blood flow

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.
Post Reply
User avatar
TwistedHelix
Family Elder
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: Northamptonshire, England.

Significant changes in MS brain blood flow

Post by TwistedHelix » Fri Nov 30, 2007 6:26 am

From time to time, the idea of MS being a vascular disease crops up, and this study appears to show a significant correlation between blood flow, lesions and disability:

Intracranial venous haemodynamics in multiple sclerosis.
Zamboni P, Menegatti E, Bartolomei I, Galeotti R, Malagoni AM, Tacconi G, Salvi F.

Vascular Diseases Center, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. zmp@unife.it.

In multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques are known to be venocentric; in addition, MS lesions and peripheral venous disorders share a number of key features. To date, however, despite the anatomical relationship between MS lesions and the venous system, no information on the intracranial venous haemodynamics of MS is available. Eighty-nine consecutive MS patients (58 relapsing-remitting, 31 secondary progressive) matched with 60 controls underwent transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS). We assessed, in supine as well as in sitting positions, the direction of flow at the activation of the thoracic pump in the deep middle cerebral veins (dMCVs), and in the transverse sinus (TS). In the dMCVs, we also measured peak systolic velocity (PSV), peak diastolic velocity (PDV), as well as the resistance index (RI). Reflux/bidirectional flow rate was significantly higher in the MS population determining also significant differences in PDV, characterized by negative values (16.2+/-1 cm/sec in controls vs. -1.3 +/-2.6 cm/sec in MS, respectively, p<0.0001). Consequently, RI was dramatically increased in the MS group, affecting impedance of cerebral venous drainage (0.48+/-0.04 in controls vs. 1.1 +/-0.08 in MS, respectively p<0.0001). Therefore, the detection of reflux directed toward the subcortical grey matter was significantly associated to highest disability scores (p < 0.0001). Our study of MS patients demonstrated significant haemodynamic alterations detected in veins anatomically related to plaque disposition. Our findings should contribute towards understanding the role of altered venous flow and tissue drainage in the MS inflammatory chain, as well as in the neurodegenerative process.

PMID: 18045150 [PubMed - in process]
Dom

User avatar
viper498
Family Elder
Posts: 428
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2005 2:00 pm
Location: Missouri, USA
Contact:

Post by viper498 » Fri Nov 30, 2007 7:16 am

Dom,

Great find. This makes sense. I wonder what they will do with this data?

Brock

User avatar
CureOrBust
Family Elder
Posts: 3355
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 2:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Significant changes in MS brain blood flow

Post by CureOrBust » Fri Nov 30, 2007 2:38 pm

PubMed wrote:Eighty-nine consecutive MS patients (58 relapsing-remitting, 31 secondary progressive) matched with 60 controls underwent transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS).
I would of liked to see some CIS or very early MS people in the study to possibly help identify if it is a cause or an effect of MS.

User avatar
MattB
Family Elder
Posts: 140
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 2:00 pm
Location: East Coast USA

Re: Significant changes in MS brain blood flow

Post by MattB » Fri Nov 30, 2007 2:50 pm

CureOrBust wrote:
PubMed wrote:Eighty-nine consecutive MS patients (58 relapsing-remitting, 31 secondary progressive) matched with 60 controls underwent transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS).
I would of liked to see some CIS or very early MS people in the study to possibly help identify if it is a cause or an effect of MS.
That would make it a lot more useful I think.

User avatar
TwistedHelix
Family Elder
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: Northamptonshire, England.

Post by TwistedHelix » Sat Dec 01, 2007 6:08 am

Definitely: whether it's the cause or effect of MS is a major question. I hope that this discovery of altered blood flow will prompt somebody to ask it,
Dom

User avatar
gibbledygook
Family Elder
Posts: 1414
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: London
Contact:

Post by gibbledygook » Thu Oct 02, 2008 11:03 am

The reason why blood pressure within the MS brain is so high MAY be because the endothelin 1 levels are so high and this protein/signaler causes vasoconstriction. Endothelin 1 levels are some 225% higher in MS patients than in controls. Now if you can reduce the endothelin 1, perhaps with a little light salvia seasoning, then the pressure and strains on the vasculature may be significantly ameliorated....
3 years antibiotics, 06/09 bilateral jug stents at C1, 05/11 ballooning of both jug valves, 07/12 stenting of renal vein, azygos & jug valve ballooning,

User avatar
TwistedHelix
Family Elder
Posts: 599
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2005 3:00 pm
Location: Northamptonshire, England.

Post by TwistedHelix » Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:36 am

… Sort of takes us all the way back to the, " MS as a vascular disease", and, " MS and headaches", threads. It can't just be us who can see these patterns emerging, can it?

By the way, does anyone else keep reading, "salvia", as, "saliva"?
Dom

Lyon
Family Elder
Posts: 6061
Joined: Wed May 03, 2006 2:00 pm
Contact:

Post by Lyon » Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:58 am

.
Last edited by Lyon on Sun Nov 27, 2011 11:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
Posts: 11867
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm
Been thanked: 15 times

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:43 am

how about "batman returns" - i always used to see "batman reruns" :S

i would like to refer this gang to the hypercoagulation thread

http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-6192.html

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post