PM10

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.
User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:37 am

2020 Oct 26
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam, South Korea
Impact of Particulate Matter on the Clinical Characteristics of Rhinitis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33103783/

Abstract

Objectives/hypothesis: To investigate the association between PM10 concentration and the severity of rhinitis symptoms.

Study design: Retrospective cohort study.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of the data of 590 participants prospectively enrolled in a regional population-based cohort study was performed. The ambient PM10 concentrations were measured at 12 different observatories located in three cities. All participants were screened for allergic sensitization by skin prick tests and asked to complete questionnaires regarding their rhinitis symptoms. The severity and duration of rhinitis were analyzed and compared at different levels of PM10 concentration. RESULTS: On multivariate analysis, the PM10 concentration significantly correlated with the severity of symptoms when adjusting for age, sex, presence of sensitized allergen, region, and the time of enrolment (β = 0.102, P = .021). Positive correlation was found between PM10 concentration and the duration of allergic rhinitis symptoms (β = 0.082, P = .077). In the stratified analysis on the atopic status, there was a significant correlation between PM10 concentration and the severity and duration of rhinitis symptoms in those without allergic sensitization (β = 0.104; P = .032 and β = 0.104; P = .011, respectively).

Conclusions: The significant correlation between the annual PM10 concentration and severity and duration of rhinitis symptoms suggests the necessity of intensive management of rhinitis patients exposed to elevated levels of ambient PM10 concentration.

-------------------------------------------------------------
MS

2011 Jan
Association between allergies and multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20456246/

bstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that expresses a typical type 1 immune response (Th1). Allergies, on the other hand, present with high levels of type 2 (Th2) cytokines. Some authors observed that Th1 and Th2 diseases could coexist in the same subject. Besides its biological plausibility, the association between MS and allergies remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine if there is an association between allergic diseases and MS. All clinical and epidemiological studies on patients with MS published up to July 2009, that assessed the association between allergic diseases and MS were reviewed. A total of 1010 articles were retrieved from search, and ten epidemiological studies were included in the analysis. The results showed that there is no evidence supporting an association between allergic diseases (OR: 0.91; CI 95%: 0.68-1.23), asthma (OR: 0.83; CI 95%: 0.48-1.44), allergic rhinitis (OR: 0.81; CI 95%: 0.59-1.12), eczema (OR: 0.93; CI 95%: 0.71-1.23) and MS. Additional prospective studies in this field might help to elucidate the nature of these associations.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:36 am

2020 Oct 19
MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Cambridge, UK
Links between air pollution and COVID-19 in England
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33120349/

Abstract

In December 2019, a novel disease, coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), emerged in Wuhan, People's Republic of China. COVID-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) presumed to have jumped species from another mammal to humans. This virus has caused a rapidly spreading global pandemic. To date, over 300,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported in England and over 40,000 patients have died. While progress has been achieved in managing this disease, the factors in addition to age that affect the severity and mortality of COVID-19 have not been clearly identified. Recent studies of COVID-19 in several countries identified links between air pollution and death rates. Here, we explored potential links between major fossil fuel-related air pollutants and SARS-CoV-2 mortality in England. We compared current SARS-CoV-2 cases and deaths from public databases to both regional and subregional air pollution data monitored at multiple sites across England. After controlling for population density, age and median income, we show positive relationships between air pollutant concentrations, particularly nitrogen oxides, and COVID-19 mortality and infectivity. Using detailed UK Biobank data, we further show that PM2.5 was a major contributor to COVID-19 cases in England, as an increase of 1 m3 in the long-term average of PM2.5 was associated with a 12% increase in COVID-19 cases. The relationship between air pollution and COVID-19 withstands variations in the temporal scale of assessments (single-year vs 5-year average) and remains significant after adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic and health-related variables. We conclude that a small increase in air pollution leads to a large increase in the COVID-19 infectivity and mortality rate in England. This study provides a framework to guide both health and emissions policies in countries affected by this pandemic.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Wed Nov 18, 2020 9:58 am

2020 Oct 28
Zoonotic Diseases Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran; Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran
Association between air pollution and Multiple Sclerosis: A systematic review
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33129851/

Abstract

Air pollution is a major public health threat. The present study is the first systematic review (SR) to determine the association of exposure to air pollution and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Progression. A Literature search was carried out using relevant keywords within several international databases. A comprehensive literature search was carried out systematically and yielded 24 eligible studies concerning the relationship of exposure to air pollution including criteria air pollutants such as particulate matter, NOx and SOx, CO2, traffic noise, etc. and MS disease. The results of the included studies reveal that there was a significant relationship between exposure to air pollution and MS development and progression. Although the effect of air pollution in the pathogenesis of MS is notfully known, according to the results of the included studies exposure to polluted air can stimulate several mechanisms that act as risk factors for developing MS and for having disease relapses or neurological disability. The major potential mechanism is Dysimmune inflammatory responses subsequent oxidative stress (OS), which leads to neuroinflammation and breakdown of the normal balance between immunity and self-tolerance. Air pollutants induce and sustain chemical reactions that produce reactive oxygen species (ROSs) and nitrogen reactive species (RNSs) which can initiate inflammatory cascades via the redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB that recruit and activate neutrophils, monocytes, and dendritic cells that stimulate the adaptive immune responses such as Th1 and Th17 inflammatory responses. The uncontrolled inflammatory responses following these events cause cell death and the release of self-antigens capable of stimulating the production of auto-aggressive T-cells via enhancing antigen presentation and facilitate entry of these cells to the central nervous system. Thus, oxidative stress is the culprit in the systemic inflammation and immune imbalance development and progression, powerful risk factors in MS.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Wed Dec 02, 2020 5:13 am

2020 Nov 6
Department of Brain and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Air pollution as a contributor to the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33158438/

Abstract

Objective: Air pollution has been recently identified as a risk factor for multiple sclerosis. Aim of this study was to investigate the immunological mechanism underlying the clinical association between air pollution, namely exposure to particulate matter 10 (PM10), and inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis (MS) METHODS: Daily recording of PM10 was obtained by monitors depending on the residence of subjects. Expression of molecules involved in activation, adhesion, and migration of T lymphocytes were tested by flow cytometry in 57 MS patients and 19 healthy controls. We next assessed in vitro the effect of PM10 on expression of C-C chemokine receptors 6 (CCR6) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), on cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDC), and on T cell polarization in PBMC/mdDC mixed cultures.

Results: We identified a significant correlation between mean PM10 levels and expression of CCR6 CD4+ T circulating cells in MS patients. This was paralleled by the observation in vitro of a higher level of CCR6 expression on PBMC following treatment with increased doses of particulate matter. Moreover, in mdDC cultures, particulate matter induced the secretion by mdDC of Th17 polarizing IL1 beta, IL6, and IL23 and, in mdDC/PBMC mixed cultures, enhanced generation of IL17-producing T cells.

Conclusions: Ex vivo and in vitro studies support the pro-inflammatory role of PM in MS, by upregulating expression of CCR6 on circulating CD4+ T cells and inducing in innate immune cells the production of Th17 polarizing cytokines. Therefore, we speculate that in MS respiratory exposure to PM10 may induce the production in the lung of autoreactive Th17 lymphocytes and boost their migratory properties through the blood-brain barrier.

---------------------------------------------

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sat Dec 12, 2020 9:53 am

2020 Nov 5
National Institute of Environmental Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, China
The Impact of Air Pollution on Intestinal Microbiome of Asthmatic Children: A Panel Study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33204702/


Abstract

Air pollution could impact on the alteration of intestinal microbiome. Maturation of intestinal microbiome in early life played an important role in the development of allergic diseases, including asthma. Recent studies presented an increase in the evidence of association between the shift of gut microbiota and asthma. This article is aimed at exploring whether the alteration in the intestinal microbiome triggered by a short wave of air pollution could influence the colonization of bacteria that have been related to the immunological mechanisms of the asthma attack. The impact of air pollution on intestinal microbiome was assessed by longitudinal comparison. Fecal samples were collected twice for twenty-one children in clean and smog days, respectively, including eleven asthmatic children and ten healthy children. Intestinal bacteria were discriminated by using the method of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The results showed that the composition of intestinal microbiome changed between clean and smog days among all children (PERMANOVA, P = 0.03). During smog days, Bifidobacteriaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Clostridium sensu stricto 1 decreased, and Streptococcaceae, Porphyromonadaceae, Rikenellaceae, Bacteroidales S24-7 group, and Bacteroides increased in asthmatic children (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.05), while Fusicatenibacter decreased and Rikenellaceae and Terrisporobacter increased in healthy children (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.05). After controlling for food consumption, the relative abundance of some bacteria belonging to Firmicutes negatively associated with concentration of PM2.5, PM10, NO2, and SO2 (multiple linear regression, P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that short wave of air pollution had an impact on the intestinal microbiome of asthmatic children. Intestinal bacteria, which have been related to immunological mechanisms of asthma attack, were also found to be associated with air pollution. This finding suggested that a short wave of air pollution may trigger asthma by impacting on intestinal bacteria.

--------------------------------------------------------
MS

7. 3. 2019
Asthma Prevalence Three Times Higher in MS - Medscape
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/910031

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:54 am

2020 Nov
School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Long-Term Ambient Air Pollution Exposures and Brain Imaging Markers in Korean Adults: The Environmental Pollution-Induced Neurological EFfects (EPINEF) Study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33215932/

..Discussion: The findings suggest that long-term exposure to high ambient air pollution may lead to cortical thinning and reduced subcortical volume in adults. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP7133.

------------------------------------------------------
MS
2020 Jun 1
Neurologic Clinic and Policlinic, Departments of Medicine, Clinical Research and Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland
Longitudinal patterns of cortical thinning in multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32067281/

Abstract

In multiple sclerosis (MS), cortical atrophy is correlated with clinical and neuropsychological measures. We aimed to examine the differences in the temporospatial evolution of cortical thickness (CTh) between MS-subtypes and to study the association of CTh with T2-weighted white matter lesions (T2LV) and clinical progression. Two hundred and forty-three MS patients (180 relapsing-remitting [RRMS], 51 secondary-progressive [SPMS], and 12 primary-progressive [PPMS]) underwent annual clinical (incl. expanded disability status scale [EDSS]) and MRI-examinations over 6 years. T2LV and CTh were measured. CTh did not differ between MS-subgroups. Higher total T2LV was associated with extended bilateral CTh-reduction on average, but did not correlate with CTh-changes over time. In RRMS, CTh- and EDSS-changes over time were negatively correlated in large bilateral prefrontal, frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital areas. In SPMS, CTh was not associated with the EDSS. In PPMS, CTh- and EDSS-changes over time were correlated in small clusters predominantly in left parietal areas. Increase of brain lesion load does not lead to an immediate CTh-reduction. Although CTh did not differ between MS-subtypes, a dissociation in the correlation between CTh- and EDSS-changes over time between RRMS and progressive-MS was shown, possibly underlining the contribution of subcortical pathology to clinical progression in progressive-MS.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Fri Dec 25, 2020 11:29 am

2020 Oct 19
Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Zeeland Public Health Service, the Netherlands
The influence of industry-related air pollution on birth outcomes in an industrialized area
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33279267/

Abstract

Recent studies suggests that air pollution, from among others road traffic, can influence growth and development of the human foetus during pregnancy. The effects of air pollution from heavy industry on birth outcomes have been investigated scarcely. Our aim was to investigate the associations of air pollution from heavy industry on birth outcomes. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4488 singleton live births (2012-2017) in the vicinity of a large industrial area in the Netherlands. Information from the birth registration was linked with a dispersion model to characterize annual individual-level exposure of pregnant mothers to air pollutants from industry in the area. Associations between particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) with low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth (PTB), and small for gestational age (SGA) were investigated by logistic regression analysis and with gestational age, birth weight, birth length, and head circumference by linear regression analysis. Exposures to NOX, SO2, and VOC (per interquartile range of 1.16, 0.42, and 0.97 μg/m3 respectively) during pregnancy were associated with LBW (OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.06-1.35, OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.00-1.43, and OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08-1.35 respectively). NOX and VOC were also associated with PTB (OR 1.14, 95%CI 1.01-1.29 and OR 1.17, 95%CI 1.04-1.31 respectively). Associations between exposure to air pollution and birth weight, birth length, and head circumference were statistically significant. Higher exposure to PM10, NOX, SO2 and VOC (per interquartile range of 0.41, 1.16, 0.42, and 0.97 μg/m3 respectively) was associated with reduced birth weight of 21 g to 30 g. The 90th percentile industry-related PM10 exposure corresponded with an average birth weight decrease of 74 g.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sun Dec 27, 2020 2:11 am

2020 Dec 6
Multiple Sclerosis Centre of the Veneto Region, Neurology Clinic, Department of Neurosciences, University of Padua, Italy
Association of Multiple Sclerosis with PM 2.5 levels. Further evidence from the highly polluted area of Padua Province, Italy
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33316725/

Abstract

Background: Fifty years of epidemiological survey and intra-regional differences in prevalence suggest that environmental factors may be associated with increased multiple sclerosis (MS) risk in Northern Italy. Based on the findings of a previous study carried out in the highly polluted Padan Plain, we further explored the relationship between PM2.5 levels and MS prevalence by comparing bordering areas characterized by quite different environmental conditions, namely the Municipality of Padua and the special protected zone (SPZ) of the Euganean Hills Regional Park, located 15 km from the City.

Methods: Three territories were identified; 1) the SPZ, extending over an area of 15.096 hectares and having a total population of 23,980 inhabitants, 2) the urban area of Padua, with a total population of 210,440 inhabitants and repeatedly recognized by the European Invironmental Agency as one of the most polluted Cities of Europe, 3) the Intermediate Zone (IZ), i.e., the area in between the previous two, including part of the urban territories of eight villages adjacent to the SPZ. Demographic and socio-economical data were obtained from official government sources (www.istat.it and www.regione.veneto.it). All Italian MS patients residing in these three areas on December 31, 2018, were registered. PM2.5 concentrations (annual average 1998-2018, μg/m3) were measured by satellite. The correlation between PM2.5 concentrations and MS prevalence was analysed.

Results: MS prevalence was significantly higher in Padua City (265/100.000) compared to both the SPZ of the Euganean Hills Park (160/100,000; p < 0.0001) and the IZ (194.4/100,000). Prevalence strongly associated with the annual average concentration of PM2.5 (r = 0.89 p < 0.00001).

Conclusion: In the Province of Padua, one of the most polluted areas of Europe, MS prevalence is strongly associated with PM2.5 exposure. Our findings suggest that air pollutants may be one of the possible environmental risk factors for MS in the Veneto Region of Italy.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sun Jan 03, 2021 4:36 am

2020 Mar 17
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Relationship between Particulate Matter (PM 10) and Airway Inflammation Measured with Exhaled Nitric Oxide Test in Seoul, Korea
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32256904/


Abstract

Purpose: Particulate matter (PM) is increasing every year in Asia. It is not fully understood how the airway is affected when inhaling PM. ..

Conclusion: The positive correlation was found in both healthy people and asthmatic patients. Therefore, PM10 can increase airway inflammation.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2003 May
Department of Neurology, Dokuz Eylül University, School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey
Nitric oxide as an activity marker in multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12736739/

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) molecules have one of the most important roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). It has been stated that a continuous and high concentration of NO metabolites in CSF and in the serum of MS patients in relapse may cause toxic damage to myelin and oligodendroglia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether NO is a marker of disease activity and is correlated with other disease activity markers such as active lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) index. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral serum (PS) samples were taken from patients with definite MS (n = 24) during relapse and remission and from control subjects (n = 18). The Griess reaction was used to measure the NO metabolites, nitrite and nitrate in CSF and PS. Cranial MRI was carried out with triple dose (0,3 mmol/kg) gadolinium and the IgG index was determined. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations (NNCs) of CSF were 11.16 +/- 8.60 micromol/ml in relapse and 6.72 +/- 3.50 micromol/ml in remission, whereas in PS they were 12.89 +/- 7.62 micromol/ml during relapse and 12.35 +/- 6.62 micromol/ml during remission. In control subjects NNCs in CSF and PS were 7.42 +/- 2.81 micromol/ml and 4.37 +/- 1.63 micromol/ml respectively. NNCs in CSF during relapse period were significantly higher than those of both remission phase and control subjects (p = 0.000). Although serum NNCs did not differ in relapse and remission, they were still higher than normal controls. Validity analysis revealed that NNC measurement in CSF was 71 % specific and 66 % sensitive to disease activity. The most important result was the significant correlation of increased NNCs with the existence of active lesion in cranial MRI and an increase in IgG index (p < 0.05).In conclusion, these results add background data to assist in further outlining the possible role of NO in the pathogenesis of MS. Together with the other markers it may be used as an activity marker in relapses of MS.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Mon Jan 04, 2021 2:47 am

2020 Mar 30
Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States
Association between exposure to air pollution and thalamus volume in adults: A cross-sectional study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32226035/


Abstract

Background: Air pollution has been associated with cognitive function and brain volume. While most previous research has examined the association between air pollution and brain volume in cortical structures or total brain volume, less research has investigated associations between exposure to air pollution and subcortical structures, including the thalamus. Further, the few available previous studies investigating associations between air pollution and thalamic volume have shown mixed results.

Methods: In this study, we evaluated the association between PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides and volume of the thalamus in adults using the UK Biobank resource, a large community-based sample, while adjusting for multiple covariates that could confound an association between air pollution and thalamic volume.

Results: In adjusted models, the left but not right thalamus volume was significantly inversely associated with PM2.5-10, although there were no significant associations between PM2.5, PM10, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides with either left or right thalamic volumes. In addition, interactions between age and PM2.5-10 and PM10 were inversely associated with thalamic volume, such that thalamic volume in older people appeared more vulnerable to the adverse effects of PM2.5-10 and PM10, and interactions between educational attainment and PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides and between self-rated health and PM2.5-10 were positively associated with thalamic volume, such that higher educational attainment and better self-rated health appeared protective against the adverse effects of air pollution on the thalamus.

Conclusion: These findings suggest a possible association between thalamic volume and air pollution particularly in older people and in people with comparatively low educational attainment at levels of air pollution found in the United Kingdom.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

MS

2013 Jan 8
The thalamus and multiple sclerosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3589190/
..A number of clinical observations as well as recent neuropathologic and neuroimaging studies have clearly demonstrated extensive involvement of the thalamus, basal ganglia, and neocortex in patients with MS..
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

2020 Dec 25
Manual and automated tissue segmentation confirm the impact of thalamus atrophy on cognition in multiple sclerosis: A multicenter study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33401136/
Last edited by Petr75 on Wed Jan 06, 2021 9:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jan 05, 2021 11:24 pm

2020 Apr 3
Department of Family Medicine, Chung-ang University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter is associated with changes in fasting glucose and lipid profiles
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32245477/

Abstract

Background: Ambient fine particulate matter is a rising concern for global public health. It was recently suggested that exposure to fine particulate matter may contribute to the development of diabetes and dyslipidaemia. This study aims to examine the potential associations of ambient particulate matter exposure with changes in fasting glucose and lipid profiles in Koreans.

Method: We used the data from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), a nationwide database representative of the Korean population. A total of 85,869 individuals aged ≥20 years were included. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between exposure to particulate matter and changes in fasting glucose and lipid profiles at 2-year intervals after adjusting for confounders.

Results: Significant associations were observed between an increase in interquartile range for particulate matter < 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and elevated levels of fasting glucose and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p for trend = 0.015 and 0.010, respectively), while no association for particulate matter sized 2.5-10 μm in diameter (PM10-2.5) was noted after adjusting for the other covariates. Sub-group analyses showed stronger associations in individuals who were older (≥60 years) or physically inactive.

Conclusions: Fine particulate matter exposure affects worsening fasting glucose and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, with no evidence of an association for coarse particulate matter.

--------------------------------------------------------
MS

2017
Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients display an altered lipoprotein profile with dysfunctional HDL
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5322497/

Abstract

Lipoproteins modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In the chronic inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS), reports on lipoprotein level alterations are inconsistent and it is unclear whether lipoprotein function is affected. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we analysed the lipoprotein profile of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients, progressive MS patients and healthy controls (HC). We observed smaller LDL in RRMS patients compared to healthy controls and to progressive MS patients. Furthermore, low-BMI (BMI ≤ 23 kg/m2) RRMS patients show increased levels of small HDL (sHDL), accompanied by larger, triglyceride (TG)-rich VLDL, and a higher lipoprotein insulin resistance (LP-IR) index. These alterations coincide with a reduced serum capacity to accept cholesterol via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G1, an impaired ability of HDL3 to suppress inflammatory activity of human monocytes, and modifications of HDL3’s main protein component ApoA-I. In summary, lipoprotein levels and function are altered in RRMS patients, especially in low-BMI patients, which may contribute to disease progression in these patients.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jan 12, 2021 11:55 pm

2020 Mar
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Ultrafine particles: unique physicochemical properties relevant to health and disease
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32203103/


Abstract

Ultrafine particles (UFPs) are aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of 0.1 µm (100 nm) or less. There is a growing concern in the public health community about the contribution of UFPs to human health. Despite their modest mass and size, they dominate in terms of the number of particles in the ambient air. A particular concern about UFPs is their ability to reach the most distal lung regions (alveoli) and circumvent primary airway defenses. Moreover, UFPs have a high surface area and a capacity to adsorb a substantial amount of toxic organic compounds. Harmful systemic health effects of PM10 or PM2.5 are often attributable to the UFP fraction. In this review, we examine the physicochemical characteristics of UFPs to enable a better understanding of the effects of these particles on human health. The characteristics of UFPs from diesel combustion will be discussed in the greatest detail because road vehicles are the primary source of UFP emissions in urban pollution hotspots. Finally, we will elaborate on the role of UFPs on global climate change, since the adverse effects of UFPs on meteorological processes and the hydrological cycle may even be more harmful to human health than their direct toxic effects.


User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:06 am

2020 Mar 13
Department of Sociology, Brigham Young University, Provo, US
Association between Exposure to Air Pollution and Total Gray Matter and Total White Matter Volumes in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32182984/

Abstract

Total brain gray-matter and white-matter volumes can be indicators of overall brain health. Among the factors associated with gray-matter and white-matter volumes is exposure to air pollution. Using data from the UK Biobank, we sought to determine associations between several components of air pollution-PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides-and total gray-matter and total white-matter volumes in multivariable regression models in a large sample of adults. We found significant inverse associations between PM2.5 concentration and total white-matter volume and between PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxide concentrations and total gray-matter volume in models adjusted for age, sex, body-mass index, self-assessment of overall health, frequency of alcohol use, smoking status, educational attainment, and income. These findings of pollutant-associated decreases in total gray-matter and total white-matter volumes are in the context of mean PM2.5 concentrations near the upper limit of the World Health Organization's recommendations. Similarly, mean PM10 concentrations were below the recommended upper limit, and nitrogen dioxide concentration was slightly above. Still, there are many areas in the world with much higher concentrations of these pollutants, which could be associated with larger effects. If replicated, these findings suggest that air pollution could be a risk factor for neurodegeneration.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Sun Jan 17, 2021 12:48 am

2021 Jan 11
Interface Demography (ID), Department of Sociology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
Residing in urban areas with higher green space is associated with lower mortality risk: A census-based cohort study with ten years of follow-up
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33444880/

Abstract

Background: Epidemiological studies suggest that residing close to green space reduce mortality rates. We investigated the relationship between long-term exposure to residential green space and non-accidental and cardio-respiratory mortality.

Methods: We linked the Belgian 2001 census to population and mortality register follow-up data (2001-2011) among adults aged 30 years and older residing in the five largest urban areas in Belgium (n = 2,185,170 and mean follow-up time 9.4 years). Residential addresses were available at baseline. Exposure to green space was defined as 1) surrounding greenness (2006) [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI2)] within buffers of 300 m, 500 m, and 1000 m; 2) surrounding green space (2006) [Urban Atlas (UA) and CORINE Land Cover (CLC)] within buffers of 300 m, 500 m, and 1000 m; and 3) perceived neighborhood green space (2001). Cox proportional hazards models with age as the underlying time scale were used to probe into cause-specific mortality (non-accidental, respiratory, COPD, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and cerebrovascular). Models were adjusted for several sociodemographic variables (age, sex, marital status, country of birth, education level, employment status, and area mean income). We further adjusted our main models for annual mean (2010) values of ambient air pollution (PM2.5, PM10, NO2 and BC, one at a time), and we additionally explored potential mediation with the aforementioned pollutants.

Results: Higher degrees of residential green space were associated with lower rates of non-accidental and respiratory mortality. In fully adjusted models, hazard ratios (HR) per interquartile range (IQR) increase in NDVI 500 m buffer (IQR: 0.24) and UA 500 m buffer (IQR: 0.31) were 0.97 (95%CI 0.96-0.98) and 0.99 (95%CI 0.98-0.99) for non-accidental mortality, and 0.95 (95%CI 0.93-0.98) and 0.97 (95%CI 0.96-0.99) for respiratory mortality. For perceived neighborhood green space, HRs were 0.93 (95%CI 0.92-0.94) and 0.94 (95%CI 0.91-0.98) for non-accidental and respiratory mortality, respectively. The observed lower mortality risks associated with residential exposure to green space were largely independent from exposure to ambient air pollutants.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1126
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: PM10

Post by Petr75 » Mon Jan 25, 2021 12:10 pm

2021 Jan 20
Rheumatology Unit, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Association between environmental air pollution and rheumatoid arthritis flares
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33470401/

------------------------------------------------------
MS

2016 Jun
Increased incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in multiple sclerosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4937922/

In conclusion, this study demonstrates that a diagnosis of MS increased the likelihood of a subsequent diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in patients, independent of sex, age, and smoking history.

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussion”