Functional electrical stimulation

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.
Post Reply
User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:31 am

2018 Sep-Oct
Street T, Singleton C.
Five-Year Follow-up of a Longitudinal Cohort Study of the Effectiveness of Functional Electrical Stimulation for People with Multiple Sclerosis.
Free PMC Article https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6200121/

Abstract
Background:
Few studies have examined the long-term consequences of using peroneal nerve functional electrical stimulation (FES) for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examines orthotic effects on a longitudinal cohort and explores additional benefits of FES on self-reported measures such as joint pain.
Methods:
One hundred forty-five people with foot drop and MS were included (mean age, 52 [range, 28-74] years). Orthotic effects, unassisted walking speed, and clinically important differences (ie, ≥0.05 and ≥0.10 m/s) were derived from walking speed over 10 m. Visual analogue scales examined joint pain, walking effort, trips, confidence, and quality of life. Measures were taken on day 1, after 6 months, and at 2, 3, 4, and 5 years.
Results:
A significant difference was found overall for walking with FES compared with walking without FES for the 5-year period (P < .001). Despite a significant decline in overall unassisted walking speed at baseline (0.58 m/s) compared with 5 years later (0.46 m/s) (P < .001), participants achieved an orthotic effect with (0.52 m/s) versus without (0.46 m/s) FES after 5 years (P < .001). A significant decrease in joint pain was found after 6 months compared with day 1 (P = .004), which was maintained after 5 years (P < .001).
Conclusions:
Despite progression of MS, long-term users of FES still benefit from an orthotic effect after using FES for 5 years. The study highlights the need for further work to assess the perceived benefits of FES regarding the experience of joint pain.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Sun Dec 23, 2018 10:54 am

2018 Nov 25
Research Center of Neurology (RCN), Russian Federation, Moscow
High-frequency rTMS and iTBS for spasticity management in secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30472778

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
The spasticity phenomenon is a significant factor in the development of disability. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising treatment method for this disorder.
AIMS:
Our aim was to compare the effects of two protocols of rTMS - the high-frequency (HF) rTMS (20 Hz) and the intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) - on the level of spasticity and concomitant symptoms in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) with an analysis of the duration of the effects up to 12 weeks after the stimulation course.
METHODS:
34 patients with SPMS and lower spastic paraparesis were randomized into 3 groups: 1) high-frequency (HF) rTMS (20 Hz); 2) intermittent theta-burst (iTBS) stimulation; 3) sham-stimulation. Spasticity and spasticity-assosiated symptoms were assessed by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), the Subjective Evaluating Spasticity Scale (SESS) and the Numerical Analog Scale (NAS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and the pain level scale.
RESULTS:
MAS was significantly reduced after the stimulation course in the HF-rTMS and iTBS groups. SESS was reduced post-intervention and at the two follow-ups in the iTBS group, while HF-rTMS produced a SESS reduction only at the 2-week follow-up, with no effects in the sham group. Conversely, reductions of pain and fatigue were found in the HF-rTMS group.
CONCLUSIONS:
The results show that HF-rTMS and iTBS significantly reduce spasticity measured by MAS, in contrast to sham stimulation. Some evidence was found in favor of a longer-lasting effect of iTBS on SESS, and of a reduction in pain and fatigue after HF-rTMS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jan 07, 2020 8:25 am

2019 Dec 27
ENT Team, EA4391, Faculty of Medicine, Paris Est Créteil University, Créteil, France
Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS): An update (2014-2018).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31901449

Abstract
A group of European experts reappraised the guidelines on the therapeutic efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) previously published in 2014 [Lefaucheur et al., Clin Neurophysiol 2014;125:2150-206]. These updated recommendations take into account all rTMS publications, including data prior to 2014, as well as currently reviewed literature until the end of 2018. Level A evidence (definite efficacy) was reached for: high-frequency (HF) rTMS of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the painful side for neuropathic pain; HF-rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) using a figure-of-8 or a H1-coil for depression; low-frequency (LF) rTMS of contralesional M1 for hand motor recovery in the post-acute stage of stroke. Level B evidence (probable efficacy) was reached for: HF-rTMS of the left M1 or DLPFC for improving quality of life or pain, respectively, in fibromyalgia; HF-rTMS of bilateral M1 regions or the left DLPFC for improving motor impairment or depression, respectively, in Parkinson's disease; HF-rTMS of ipsilesional M1 for promoting motor recovery at the post-acute stage of stroke; intermittent theta burst stimulation targeted to the leg motor cortex for lower limb spasticity in multiple sclerosis; HF-rTMS of the right DLPFC in posttraumatic stress disorder; LF-rTMS of the right inferior frontal gyrus in chronic post-stroke non-fluent aphasia; LF-rTMS of the right DLPFC in depression; and bihemispheric stimulation of the DLPFC combining right-sided LF-rTMS (or continuous theta burst stimulation) and left-sided HF-rTMS (or intermittent theta burst stimulation) in depression. Level A/B evidence is not reached concerning efficacy of rTMS in any other condition. The current recommendations are based on the differences reached in therapeutic efficacy of real vs. sham rTMS protocols, replicated in a sufficient number of independent studies. This does not mean that the benefit produced by rTMS inevitably reaches a level of clinical relevance.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Wed Jun 03, 2020 11:02 am

2020 May 8
Department of Rehabilitation, Third Faculty of Medicine and Kralovske Vinohrady University Hospital, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Randomized Comparison of Functional Electric Stimulation in Posturally Corrected Position and Motor Program Activating Therapy: Treating Foot Drop in People With Multiple Sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32383574/


Abstract

Background: Functional Electric Stimulation (FES) is recommended for foot drop in multiple sclerosis, although little is known about its therapeutic effect.

Aim: To evaluate a therapeutic effect immediately and two months after program termination (persistent and delayed effect) of a new approach using FES in combination with correcting the patients' postural system. More specifically, we evaluate the effects of this approach on the patients' clinical functions and compared it with individual physiotherapy.

Design: Parallel randomised blind trial.

Setting: 2-month long treatments, Functional Electric Stimulation in Posturally Corrected Position (Group 1) and neuroproprioceptive facilitation and inhibition physiotherapy called Motor Program Activating Therapy (Group 2).

Population: 44 subjects with Multiple Sclerosis.

Methods: Primary outcomes: gait (the 2-Minute Walk Test; Timed 25-Foot Walk test; Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12) and balance (by e.g. Berg Balance Scale, BBS; The Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale, ABC; Timed Up and Go Test, TUG). Secondary outcome: mobility, cognition, fatigue and subjects' perceptions (e. g. Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale, MSIS; Euroqol-5 dimensions-5 levels, EQ-5D-5L).

Results: Group 1 showed immediate therapeutic effect in BBS (p = 0.008), ABC (p=0.04) and EQ-5D-5L (self-care, p=0.019, mobility p=0,005). The improvement in EQ-5D-5L persisted and in TUGcognitive we documented a delayed effect (p=0.005). Group 2 showed an immediate improvement in BBS (p = 0.025), MSIS (p=0.043) and several aspects of daily life (the effect on health today was significantly higher than in Group 1, significant difference between groups p=0.038).

Conclusions: FES in the Posturally Corrected Position has an immediate therapeutic effect on balance and patients' perceptions comparable to Motor Program Activating Therapy, and higher persistent and even delayed therapeutic effect.

Clinical rehabilitation impact: The study results point to the importance of correcting the patients' posture when applying FES, the possibility to treat foot drop by individual physiotherapy and the activation of the patients' auto reparative processes.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Sun Aug 09, 2020 2:24 am

2020 Jul 17
Santa Lucia Foundation IRCCS, Rome, Italy
Cerebellar Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation Combined with Vestibular Rehabilitation Improves Gait and Balance in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a Preliminary Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32681455/

Abstract

Difficulties in gait and balance disorders are among the most common mobility limitations in multiple sclerosis (MS), mainly due to a damage of cerebellar circuits. Moreover, the cerebellum plays a critical role in promoting new motor tasks, which is an essential function for neurorehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effects of cerebellar intermittent theta burst stimulation (c-iTBS), a high-frequency rTMS protocol able to increase cerebellar activity, on gait and balance in a sample of 20 hospitalized participants with MS, undergoing vestibular rehabilitation (VR), an exercise-based program primarily designed to reduce vertigo and dizziness, gaze instability, and/or imbalance and falls in MS. Patients were assigned to receive either c-iTBS or sham iTBS before being treated with VR during 2 weeks. VR consisted of two types of training: gaze stability and postural stability exercises. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline in the Tinetti Balance and Gait scale (TBG). The secondary outcome measures were changes from baseline in Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Two Minute Walking Test (2MWT), and Timed 25-ft walk test (T25FW) scales. MS patients treated with c-iTBS-VR showed a significant improvement in the TBG as compared to patients treated with sham iTBS-VR. Moreover, MS patients in the c-iTBS groups showed better performances in the vestibular-ocular reflex exercises. Combined c-iTBS and VR improves gait and balance abilities more than standard VR treatment in MS patients with a high level of disability.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Sun Aug 23, 2020 2:20 am

2020 Jul 7
Unit of Neurology & Neurorehabilitation, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy
Inflammation and Corticospinal Functioning in Multiple Sclerosis: A TMS Perspective
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32733354/

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been employed in multiple sclerosis (MS) to assess the integrity of the corticospinal tract and the corpus callosum and to explore some physiological properties of the motor cortex. Specific alterations of TMS measures have been strongly associated to different pathophysiological mechanisms, particularly to demyelination and neuronal loss. Moreover, TMS has contributed to investigate the neurophysiological basis of MS symptoms, particularly those not completely explained by conventional structural damage, such as fatigue. However, variability existing between studies suggests that alternative mechanisms should be involved. Knowledge of MS pathophysiology has been enriched by experimental studies in animal models (i.e., experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis) demonstrating that inflammation alters synaptic transmission, promoting hyperexcitability and neuronal damage. Accordingly, TMS studies have demonstrated an imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition in MS. In particular, cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of different proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules have been associated to corticospinal hyperexcitability, highlighting that inflammatory synaptopathy may represent a key pathophysiological mechanism in MS. In this perspective article, we discuss whether corticospinal excitability alterations assessed with TMS in MS patients could be useful to explain the pathophysiological correlates and their relationships with specific MS clinical characteristics and symptoms. Furthermore, we discuss evidence indicating that, in MS patients, inflammatory synaptopathy could be present since the early phases, could specifically characterize relapses, and could progressively increase during the disease course.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Wed Sep 23, 2020 10:57 am

2020 Aug 24
The Brain Centre, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK
Functional electrical stimulation for foot drop in people with multiple sclerosis: The relevance and importance of addressing quality of movement
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32833562/

Abstract

Impaired mobility is common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Changes in gait have different causes and require individualised gait rehabilitation. A common and often early cause of mobility impairment is footdrop, inability to lift the foot during the swing phase of gait, with increased risk of falls, effortful walking and fatigue. Using literature review, we have characterised published data on footdrop treatment in MS, specifically functional electrical stimulation (FES) to better understand the reported outcomes relevant to the user. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of FES and how far it meets the needs of people with footdrop. Physiotherapy combined with FES may further enhance the benefits of FES. MS studies emphasise the value of maintaining activity levels in early MS but discussion on how to achieve this is lacking. We emphasise the value of qualitative measures to broaden our understanding and improve treatment and adherence and identify areas for further research. Supplementary video material illustrates key features of MS gait and its correction using FES and physiotherapy.

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Tue Sep 29, 2020 6:06 am

Jul-Aug 2020
Deborah Backus, Marina Moldavskiy, W Mark Sweatman
Effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling on Fatigue and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis Who Are Nonambulatory
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32863788/

Abstract

Background: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling provides an exercise opportunity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who are nonambulatory. This study evaluated the efficacy of FES cycling for reducing fatigue and improving quality of life in people with MS who are nonambulatory and compared outcomes with those in a control group that did not take part in FES cycling.

Methods: Adults with MS with self-reported Expanded Disability Status Scale scores of 7.0 to 8.5 were randomized into a training group (n = 12) or a control group (n = 9). The training group performed FES cycling for 30 minutes, two to three times a week for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was safety, measured as the number and type of adverse events and any increase in symptoms. Other outcomes collected before and after the intervention were scores on the modified Ashworth Scale, manual muscle test, 5-item Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS-5), Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC), Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MSQOL-54), and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale.

Results: Twelve participants completed the study and were analyzed. Six participants completed training with no adverse events. The MFIS-5 (Cohen's d = 0.60), FSMC (Cohen's d = 0.37), and PHQ-9 (Cohen's d = 0.67) scores and the physical health composite of the MSQOL-54 (Cohen's d = 1.48) improved for the training group compared with the control group (n = 6).

Conclusions: Functional electrical stimulation cycling is safe for people with MS who are nonambulatory and may reduce fatigue and improve measurements of quality of life.
Keywords: Cycling; Exercise; Functional electr

User avatar
NHE
Volunteer Moderator
Posts: 5586
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2004 3:00 pm
Contact:

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by NHE » Tue Sep 29, 2020 11:15 am

Petr75 wrote:
Tue Sep 29, 2020 6:06 am
Jul-Aug 2020
Deborah Backus, Marina Moldavskiy, W Mark Sweatman
Effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling on Fatigue and Quality of Life in People with Multiple Sclerosis Who Are Nonambulatory
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32863788/
It looks like an interesting rehab device.

https://restorative-therapies.com/ifes- ... -leg-core/

Free full text.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl ... -4-193.pdf

User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 1115
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Functional electrical stimulation

Post by Petr75 » Thu Oct 08, 2020 10:27 am

2020 Aug 7
Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), Córdoba, Spain.
Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neurocognition and Oxidative Stress in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Report
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articl ... -00817.pdf

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative condition whose manifestation and clinical evolution can present themselves in very different ways. Analogously, its treatment has to be personalized and the patient's response may be idiosyncratic. At this moment there is no cure for it, in addition to its clinical course sometimes being torpid, with a poor response to any treatment. However, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated its usefulness as a non-invasive therapeutic tool for the treatment of some psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. Some studies show that the application of rTMS implies improvement in patients with MS at various levels, but the effects at the psychometric level and the redox profile in blood have never been studied before, despite the fact that both aspects have been related to the severity of MS and its evolution. Here we present the case of a woman diagnosed with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) at the age of 33, with a rapid progression of her illness and a poor response to different treatments previously prescribed for 9 years. In view of the patient's clinical course, a compassionate treatment with rTMS for 1 year was proposed. Starting from the fourth month of treatment, when reviewing the status of her disease, the patient denoted a clear improvement at different levels. There followed out psychometric evaluations and blood analyses, that showed both an improvement in her neuropsychological functions and a reduction in oxidative stress in plasma, in correspondence with therTMS treatment.

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to “General Discussion”