Remyelination

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Petr75
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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jul 28, 2020 11:27 am

2020 Jul 7
Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Calorie restriction promotes remyelination in a Cuprizone-Induced demyelination mouse model of multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32638202/

Abstract

Over the past few decades several attempts have been made to introduce a potential and promising therapy for Multiple sclerosis (MS). Calorie restriction (CR) is a dietary manipulation to reduce calorie intake which has been shown to improve neuroprotection and attenuate neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we evaluated the effect of 33% CR regimen for 4 weeks on the remyelination capacity of Cuprizone (CPZ) induced demyelination in a mouse model of MS. Results showed that CR induced a significant increase in motor coordination and balance performance in CPZ mice. Also, luxol fast blue (LFB) staining showed that CR regimen significantly improved the remyelination in the corpus callosum of CPZ + CR mice compared to the CPZ group. In addition, CR regimen significantly increased the transcript expression levels of BDNF, Sox2, and Sirt1 in the corpus callosum of CPZ mice, while decreasing the p53 levels. Moreover, CR regimen significantly decreased the apoptosis rate. Furthermore, astrogliosis (GFAP + astrocytes) and microgliosis (Iba-1 + microglia) were significantly decreased by CR regimen while oligodendrogenesis (Olig2+) and Sirt1 + cell expression were significantly increased in the corpus callosum of CPZ + CR mice compared to the CPZ group. In conclusion, CR regimen can promote remyelination potential in a CPZ-demyelinating mouse model of MS by increasing oligodendrocyte generation while decreasing their apoptosis.

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Petr75
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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 11:28 pm

2020 Jul 9
Department of Biomedical Sciences of Cells and Systems, Section Molecular Neurobiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Netherlands
Macroglial diversity: white and grey areas and relevance to remyelination
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32648004/

Abstract

Macroglia, comprising astrocytes and oligodendroglial lineage cells, have long been regarded as uniform cell types of the central nervous system (CNS). Although regional morphological differences between these cell types were initially described after their identification a century ago, these differences were largely ignored. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that macroglial cells form distinct populations throughout the CNS, based on both functional and morphological features. Moreover, with the use of refined techniques including single-cell and single-nucleus RNA sequencing, additional evidence is emerging for regional macroglial heterogeneity at the transcriptional level. In parallel, several studies revealed the existence of regional differences in remyelination capacity between CNS grey and white matter areas, both in experimental models for successful remyelination as well as in the chronic demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we provide an overview of the diversity in oligodendroglial lineage cells and astrocytes from the grey and white matter, as well as their interplay in health and upon demyelination and successful remyelination. In addition, we discuss the implications of regional macroglial diversity for remyelination in light of its failure in MS. Since the etiology of MS remains unknown and only disease-modifying treatments altering the immune response are available for MS, the elucidation of macroglial diversity in grey and white matter and its putative contribution to the observed difference in remyelination efficiency between these regions may open therapeutic avenues aimed at enhancing endogenous remyelination in either area.

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Petr75
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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Fri Jul 31, 2020 11:34 pm

2020 Jul 9
Department of Biology, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
EEF1A1 deacetylation enables transcriptional activation of remyelination
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32647127/


Abstract

Remyelination of the peripheral and central nervous systems (PNS and CNS, respectively) is a prerequisite for functional recovery after lesion. However, this process is not always optimal and becomes inefficient in the course of multiple sclerosis. Here we show that, when acetylated, eukaryotic elongation factor 1A1 (eEF1A1) negatively regulates PNS and CNS remyelination. Acetylated eEF1A1 (Ac-eEF1A1) translocates into the nucleus of myelinating cells where it binds to Sox10, a key transcription factor for PNS and CNS myelination and remyelination, to drag Sox10 out of the nucleus. We show that the lysine acetyltransferase Tip60 acetylates eEF1A1, whereas the histone deacetylase HDAC2 deacetylates eEF1A1. Promoting eEF1A1 deacetylation maintains the activation of Sox10 target genes and increases PNS and CNS remyelination efficiency. Taken together, these data identify a major mechanism of Sox10 regulation, which appears promising for future translational studies on PNS and CNS remyelination.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Sat Aug 15, 2020 9:26 pm

2020 Aug
Sorbonne University, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut du Cerveau (ICM), Groupe Hospitalier APHP-Sorbonne University, Neurology Department Pitié-Salpêtrière, Groupe Hospitalier APHP-Sorbonne University, Paris, France
Remyelination in multiple sclerosis: from basic science to clinical translation
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32702337/


Abstract

The treatment of multiple sclerosis has been transformed by the successful development of immunotherapies that efficiently reduce disease activity and related clinical relapses during the relapsing-remitting phase of the disease. However, the prevention of disability progression, which is due to axonal and neuronal damage and loss, has yet to be achieved and is therapeutically challenging, particularly during the progressive phase of the disease. One strategy to counteract neurodegeneration is to promote neuroprotection by enhancing myelin regeneration, hence restoring nerve conduction and metabolic support to the axon. Animal studies have provided targets for interventions to improve brain and spinal cord remyelination, paving the way for the translation of this research to humans. From these initial and promising forays, further problems have emerged, including questions on how best to design these clinical trials and appropriately measure the outcomes. Solving these problems will need additional work before efficacious pro-remyelination therapies will be ready for people with multiple sclerosis, but there is a real sense of hope that researchers are getting closer to a successful therapy.

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2020 Aug
Catherine Lubetzki-expert on remyelination in multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32702331/
https://icm-institute.org/en/team/team- ... -stankoff/

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We discover and develop innovative first-in-class remyelinating therapies for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis and other myelin-related diseases. https://rewindtherapeutics.com/

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Sun Aug 23, 2020 12:55 am

2020 Jul 7
Department of Neurology, Institute of Neurosciences, IdISSC, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Particles Containing Cells as a Strategy to Promote Remyelination in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32733364/

Abstract

The repair of demyelinated lesions is a key objective in multiple sclerosis research. Remyelination fundamentally depends on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) reaching the lesion; this is influenced by numerous factors including age, disease progression time, inflammatory activity, and the pool of OPCs available, whether they be NG2 cells or cells derived from neural stem cells. Administering OPCs has been proposed as a potential cell therapy; however, these cells can only be administered directly. This article discusses the potential administration of OPCs encapsulated within hydrogel particles composed of biocompatible biomaterials, via the nose-to-brain pathway. We also discuss conditions for the indication of this therapy, and such related issues as the influence on endogenous remyelination, migration of OPCs to demyelinated areas, and the immune response, given the autoimmune nature of multiple sclerosis. Chitosan and derivatives constitute the most promising biomaterial for this purpose, although these issues must be addressed. In conclusion, this line of research may yield an alternative to the remyelinating drugs currently being studied.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Thu Sep 03, 2020 7:18 am

2020 Aug 9
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis
TREM2 activation on microglia promotes myelin debris clearance and remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32772264/


Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) triggered by autoimmune mechanisms. Microglia are critical for the clearance of myelin debris in areas of demyelination, a key step to allow remyelination. TREM2 is expressed by microglia and promotes microglial survival, proliferation, and phagocytic activity. Herein we demonstrate that TREM2 was highly expressed on myelin-laden phagocytes in active demyelinating lesions in the CNS of subjects with MS. In gene expression studies, macrophages from subjects with TREM2 genetic deficiency displayed a defect in phagocytic pathways. Treatment with a new TREM2 agonistic antibody promoted the clearance of myelin debris in the cuprizone model of CNS demyelination. Effects included enhancement of myelin uptake and degradation, resulting in accelerated myelin debris removal by microglia. Most importantly, antibody-dependent TREM2 activation on microglia increased density of oligodendrocyte precursors in areas of demyelination, as well as the formation of mature oligodendrocytes thus enhancing remyelination and axonal integrity. These results are relevant as they propose TREM2 on microglia as a potential new target to promote remyelination.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:27 am

2020 Sep 1
Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville
Anacardic acid induces IL-33 and promotes remyelination in CNS
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32817520/

Abstract

Given the known neuroreparative actions of IL-33 in experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) injury, we predicted that compounds which induce IL-33 are likely to promote remyelination. We found anacardic acid as a candidate molecule to serve as a therapeutic agent to promote remyelination. Addition of anacardic acid to cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) rapidly increased expression of myelin genes and myelin proteins, suggesting a direct induction of genes involved in myelination by anacardic acid. Also, when added to OPCs, anacardic acid resulted in the induction of IL-33. In vivo, treatment of with anacardic acid in doses which ranged from 0.025 mg/kg to 2.5 mg/kg, improved pathologic scores in experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE) and in the cuprizone model of demyelination/remyelination. Electron microscopic studies performed in mice fed with cuprizone and treated with anacardic acid showed lower g-ratio scores when compared to controls, suggesting increased remyelination of axons. In EAE, improvement in paralytic scores was seen when the drug was given prior to or following the onset of paralytic signs. In EAE and in the cuprizone model, areas of myelin loss, which are likely to remyelinate, was associated with a greater recruitment of IL-33-expressing OPCs in mice which received anacardic acid when compared to controls.

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wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anacardic_acids

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NHE
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Re: Remyelination

Post by NHE » Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:09 pm

Cashew shell compound appears to mend damaged nerves
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases ... 081720.php

In laboratory experiments, a chemical compound found in the shell of the cashew nut promotes the repair of myelin, a team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Myelin is a protective sheath surrounding nerves. Damage to this covering -- demyelination -- is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis and related diseases of the central nervous system.

"We see this as an exciting finding, suggesting a new avenue in the search for therapies to correct the ravages of MS and other demyelinating diseases," said the paper's senior author, Subramaniam Sriram, MBBS, William C. Weaver III Professor of Neurology and chief of the Division of Neuroimmunology.

Previous work led by Sriram showed that a protein called interleukin 33, or IL-33, induced myelin formation. IL-33 is, among other things, an immune response regulator, and multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disorder.

The cashew shell compound is called anacardic acid. Sriram and team grew interested in it because it's known to inhibit an enzyme involved in gene expression called histone acetyltransferase, or HAT, and the team had discovered that whatever inhibits HAT induces production of IL-33.

The report includes a range of new findings that point to potential therapeutic use of anacardic acid for demyelinating diseases:
  • In vitro, the addition of the compound to rat cells most responsible for myelination -- oligodendrocyte precursor cells, or OPCs -- spurred induction of IL-33 and rapidly increased the expression of myelin genes and proteins, including dose-dependent increases in myelin basic protein;

  • In two animal models of demyelination [cuprizone & EAE], treatment with the compound increased the relative presence of IL-33-expressing OPCs and led to reduced paralysis;

  • In an animal model of demyelination treated with the compound, dissection and electron microscopy showed dose-dependent increases in myelination.
"These are striking results that clearly urge further study of anarcardic acid for demyelinating diseases," Sriram said.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by NHE » Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:58 pm

Ginkgolic acid shares a similar molecular structure to anacardic acid and is found in ginkgo.

https://www.amazoilhealth.com/wp-conten ... pacity.pdf

Note, many ginkgo extracts are purified of ginkgolic acid as it's been reported to be allergenic.

Anacardic acid

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Ginkgolic acid

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Re: Remyelination

Post by NHE » Thu Sep 17, 2020 3:13 am

Similar to anacardic acid, ginkgolic acid has also been shown to have antitumor activity.

Ginkgolic Acid C 17:1, Derived from Ginkgo biloba Leaves, Suppresses Constitutive and Inducible STAT3 Activation through Induction of PTEN and SHP-1 Tyrosine Phosphatase
Molecules. 2017 Feb 13;22(2):276.

Ginkgolic acid C 17:1 (GAC 17:1) extracted from Ginkgo biloba leaves, has been previously reported to exhibit diverse antitumor effect(s) through modulation of several molecular targets in tumor cells, however the detailed mechanism(s) of its actions still remains to be elucidated. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic transcription factor that regulates various critical functions involved in progression of diverse hematological malignancies, including multiple myeloma, therefore attenuating STAT3 activation may have a potential in cancer therapy. We determined the anti-tumor mechanism of GAC 17:1 with respect to its effect on STAT3 signaling pathway in multiple myeloma cell lines. We found that GAC 17:1 can inhibit constitutive activation of STAT3 through the abrogation of upstream JAK2, Src but not of JAK1 kinases in U266 cells and also found that GAC can suppress IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in MM.1S cells. Treatment of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor blocked suppression of STAT3 phosphorylation by GAC 17:1, thereby indicating a critical role for a PTP. We also demonstrate that GAC 17:1 can induce the substantial expression of PTEN and SHP-1 at both protein and mRNA level. Further, deletion of PTEN and SHP-1 genes by siRNA can repress the induction of PTEN and SHP-1, as well as abolished the inhibitory effect of drug on STAT3 phosphorylation. GAC 17:1 down-regulated the expression of STAT3 regulated gene products and induced apoptosis of tumor cells. Overall, GAC 17:1 was found to abrogate STAT3 signaling pathway and thus exert its anticancer effects against multiple myeloma cells.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:35 am

2020 Aug 25
Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, System Medicine Research Center, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China
Mechanisms underlying remyelination with special focus on demyelination models of multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32985167/

Abstract

Failure to remyelinate and rewrap the demyelinated axons has been revealed as the major hurdle for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), and the bottleneck is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) to differentiate into mature oligodendrocyte. Remyelination is a spontaneous regenerative process, which includes activation, migration and differentiation of OPC, and is believed to protect the axon and further halt neurodegeneration. In recent years, studies have identified many potential drug targets for efficiently promoting OPC differentiation in in vivo demyelination models, such as metformin, clemostine, and drug targets as myelin transcription factor 1-like protein (Myt1L), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor, connexin 43 (Cx43), G protein coupled receptor 17 (GPR17), κ opioid receptor (KOR), sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), Δ14-sterol reductase (TM7SF2), emopamil-binding protein (EBP). This review summarizes the recent progress on the mechanisms underlying the activation, migration and differentiation of OPC in remyelination with special focus on studies using demyelination models of MS, which may provide insights of further exploring new therapeutic strategies for MS.

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Re: Remyelination

Post by Petr75 » Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:24 am

2020 Oct 17
Wellcome-Medical Research Council Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Revisiting remyelination: Towards a consensus on the regeneration of CNS myelin
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33082115/

Abstract

The biology of CNS remyelination has attracted considerable interest in recent years because of its translational potential to yield regenerative therapies for the treatment of chronic and progressive demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Critical to devising myelin regenerative therapies is a detailed understanding of how remyelination occurs. The accepted dogma, based on animal studies, has been that the myelin sheaths of remyelination are made by oligodendrocytes newly generated from adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in a classical regenerative process of progenitor migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, recent human and a growing number of animal studies have revealed a second mode of remyelination in which mature oligodendrocytes surviving within an area of demyelination are able to regenerate new myelin sheaths. This discovery, while opening up new opportunities for therapeutic remyelination, has also raised the question of whether there are fundamental differences in myelin regeneration between humans and some of the species in which experimental remyelination studies are conducted. Here we review how this second mode of remyelination can be integrated into a wider and revised framework for understanding remyelination in which apparent species differences can be reconciled but that also raises important questions for future research.

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