Diet

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.
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Petr75
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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Fri Sep 25, 2020 10:08 am

2020 Jun 6
Department of Environmental Hygiene, College of Preventive Medicine, Army Medical University (Third Military Medical University), China
The relationship between soluble silicate acid in drinking water and food and human health
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32842290/

Abstract

Silicon was once considered a biologically inert element, but recent research has shown its value for human health. Soluble silicic acid is the available form of silicon in human body. This paper reviews the absorption, distribution and metabolic characteristics of dietary soluble silicic acid in human body, as well as its relationship with human health. Available data show that it has lots of supporting evidences that dietary soluble silicic acid can prevent osteoporosis, maintain vascular health, improve the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. Its unique crosslinking ability and antagonism to toxic aluminum play a crucial role. In the early stage of human life, there is a strong demand for silicon, and the level of silicon in the aged is generally reduced, suggesting that pregnant women and old people should pay attention to the intake of soluble silicic acid. It is suggested to strengthen the basic and applied research on dietary soluble silicic acid, and gradually establish the relevant nutrition and hygiene standards.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Sun Sep 27, 2020 11:02 pm

July 31, 2020
Department of Neurology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Multiple sclerosis and nutrition: back to the future?
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/1 ... 6420936165

During the last few decades, treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has seen significant progress: by now 14 therapies are approved and soon more will come.1,2 This is a dramatic improvement when we think back 30 years and remember our helplessness in providing effective long-term therapy in the 1980s. At that time one of the authors (RG) was a young resident and his professor told him about the Swank MS diet,3 which had been described after World War 2. The epidemiological studies of Swank in Norway had reported a much lower prevalence of MS in coastal regions of Norway as compared with the rural part of Norway. In turn, the postulate was that long-chained unsaturated fatty-acids from fish and sea food were protective and abundant red meat in rural areas may be detrimental to developing autoimmunity. These hypotheses were the basis for a number of therapeutic studies with unsaturated omega-3 fatty acids as postulated antioxidative nutritional compounds in the following decades. Yet even the most modern, randomised and double-blinded Norwegian trial by Myhr’s group could not deliver convincing data for a benefit of omega-3 fatty acids.4 Like Swank, whose postulated drastic increase of fat intake would have led to an increased intake of fruits, vegetables and complex carbohydrates, the German physician Evers also proposed a fibre-enriched completely natural diet for MS patients.5

With the arrival of novel recombinant and translational treatment options, the MS diet got lost in our daily practice. Whilst an armamentarium of MS therapies has been approved, the overall prevalence of MS has also seen a dramatic increase. In Germany in the 1980s there were an estimated 50,000 MS patients at most.6 With the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into clinical routine, and also the diagnostic McDonald criteria,7 it came as no surprise that, at the beginning of this century, studies from MS charities estimated 120,000 patients.8 By 2014, the German Federal Institute for Insurance reported 200,000 MS patients monitored by the public health care system,9 whilst there are another 8% who have private insurance and are not detected by this approach. This sums up to a total of 220,000 MS patients in Germany. So altogether Germany experienced at least a three-fold increase in MS prevalence during the past 30 years. This may be clearly more than expected due to MRI techniques for detecting lesions in vivo, and by modern diagnostic MS criteria, which allow diagnosis after the first relapse if there are active gadolinium enhancing lesions and older T2 lesions in specific topographies.10

What else changed in these three decades? Some people favour the hygiene hypothesis of our society11: the reduction of infectious stimuli in our post-industrial society is postulated to augment the propensity for autoimmune responses. The immune system may thus be looking for new enemies since traditional infectious challenges have almost gone. This claim is made for autoimmune and allergic diseases. There are other possible contributing factors, such as less sun exposure and subsequently less vitamin D; increase in smoking habits, especially in women; and obesity.12

The most significant change that we have experienced is probably a change in lifestyle, with altered environmental exposure to food and ingredients. While traditional fibre-rich diets disappear more and more, the use of palatable fast food from commercial food chains has become more frequent throughout Europe and especially in North America. A link between the immune system and the gut has been made already by Indian Ayurveda medicine. Yet these findings have not been proven by modern molecular medicine. Another important aspect is the addition of multiple antibiotics in feeding cattle and other meat-producing animals. This implies that we experience permanent uptake of antibiotics through our food. A profound change in our natural microbiota is highly probable.

Is the jury on these questions still out? During this decade the link between the gut and systemic autoimmunity has been established on a scientific basis. With the generation of the double-transgenic neuromyelitis optica (NMO)-mouse at the Kuchroo laboratory, the question of why the onset of spontaneous autoimmunity in these mice exhibited a high variability between different research sites soon came up?13 Wekerle’s group at Martinsried had the idea to keep these mice under germ-free conditions with completely sterile nutrition. Surprisingly, these mice did not develop the animal model for MS, experimental encephalomyelitis (EAE), unless they were artificially repopulated with defined bacterial strains.14 This clearly confirmed the interaction of gut microbiota and the immune system.

With modern DNA-/RNA-based molecular diagnostic tools, a high number of bacterial strains can be identified in human faeces. Thus, the scientific question was whether to go further into these details, or rather look at metabolomics and different products that were the focus of gut–immune system interactions. When saturated fatty acids were examined in the setting of EAE and lymphocyte cell cultures, it soon turned out that short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; 1–5 carbon atoms) were clearly immunoregulatory, whereas larger ones activated the immune system and, in particular, T cell autoimmunity.15 For several reasons, the focus was then directed towards propionate. An investigator-initiated translational study at the University of Bochum was set up to thoroughly characterize 250 MS patients with regard to the metabolome, microbiome and immune phenotype, and also to look at clinical and MRI parameters. Since there was no external sponsorship, and propionate is a food supplement, we selected an uncontrolled design in which patients were left on their MS medication. The patients then received propionate 2 × 500 mg as an add-on to their established medication for MS for a minimum of 90 days during the study; thereafter, they were offered an open extension phase for up to 2 years. Surprisingly, the greatest reduction of propionate was found in faeces of patients with clinically isolated syndrome but also in established MS, although to a lesser degree, where faecal levels of propionate were reduced by 50%.16 The microbiota also differed greatly between subtypes of MS and healthy controls. Following propionate supplementation, levels were analysed after 2 weeks and 90 days. Not only were serum and faecal levels of propionate restored by 3 weeks, the number of functionally active regulatory T lymphocytes was also restored. In turn, TH17-TH1 autoimmunity was reduced. In addition, human faecal transfer into an intestinal organ culture system confirmed that anti-inflammatory responses were dominant after propionate supplementation. Since this was not placebo-controlled, the reduction in relapse rate and Expanded Disability Status Scale disability of the 250 patients in the study should be treated with caution. Of note, a subgroup received longitudinal sophisticated MRI analyses of basal ganglia atrophy and a partial reversal of this atrophy process was observed.

Where do we stand now with these findings? The influence of nutritional components and impact of changes in microbiota of the gut clearly underscore their interaction with the immune system.17 Certainly Swank and Evers were going in the right direction, yet at that time no one knew that the microbiota in MS patients would also be profoundly changed.16 We feel that the hen–egg question here may rather give the answer that the chronic exposure to inflammatory systemic conditions like MS may, in turn, change the gut-microbiota. And finally, it may be of note that, in Germany, propionate disappeared from bread, where it was incorporated as a preservative, to 0.2–0.3% of weight, in the late 1980s. Until then, two slices of bread originally contained about 500 mg propionate. We may speculate that this may be another factor in the chain of events that has caused a more than threefold rise in MS prevalence in Germany and Western societies over the last 30 years.
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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Mon Nov 16, 2020 11:34 am

2020 Oct 30
Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
The ameliorative effects of capsidiol isolated from elicited Capsicum annuum on mouse splenocyte immune responses and neuroinflammation
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33124100/

Abstract

Capsidiol, is an anti-fungal phytoalexin produced by plants of Solanaceae. Capsidiol was examined in cultures of primary splenocytes (SPLCs) isolated from healthy C57BL/6 mice and from those with induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a mouse model for autoimmune neurodegenerative multiple sclerosis (MS). We also examined the impact of capsidiol in IFN-γ-stimulated mouse BV2 microglial cells. Capsidiol resulted in a significant reduction in the anti-CD3/CD28 (αCD3/CD28)-induced IFN-γ+ CD4+ (Th1) and IFN-γ+ CD8+ (Tc1) populations as well as in the production of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-6, IL-2, TNF-α, and IP-10). Specifically, the CD4+ and CD8+ populations (T-bet+ IFN-γ- , T-bet+ IFN-γ+ , and T-bet- IFN-γ+ ) and cytokine production mediated by Th1/Tc1 polarization were diminished by 25 μM capsidiol. MOG35-55 restimulation of SPLCs from EAE mice resulted in an increase in antigen-specific T cells, including Th1, IL-17A+ CD4+ (Th17), and IL-17A+ CD8+ (Tc17) populations. By contrast, capsidiol resulted in a decrease in the proportions of Th17 and Tc17 cells; MOG35-55 -specific cytokine production was also diminished by capsidiol. Capsidiol treatment resulted in diminished levels of IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide and IL-6; expression of iNOS and COX-2 were suppressed by 50 μM capsidiol in IFN-γ-stimulated BV2 cells. This is the first report of capsidiol-mediated immunomodulatory and antineuroinflammatory activities that may serve to prevent neurodegeneration.


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wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:10 am

2020 Oct
Universidade Metropolitanta de Santos, School of Human Nutrition, Santos SP, Brazil
Dietary habits in a group of patients with multiple sclerosis are similar to those of healthy control subjects
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33146289/


Abstract

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Over time, patients with MS accumulate neurological disabilities. MS typically affects young adults and is associated with an inflammatory profile of cytokines and lymphocytes. If a patient were to consume a potentially inflammatory diet, it is possible that the evolution of MS in that individual would be more aggressive.

Objective: To investigate whether patients with MS living in and around the city of Santos, São Paulo, Brazil, had a profile of inflammatory diet.

Methods: Patients with MS and healthy control subjects were individually interviewed, and the 24-hour Diet Recall and the Bristol Stool Form Scale were applied. Salt intake was calculated using the WebDiet 2.0 software.

Results: There were no remarkable differences in dietary habits between healthy control subjects (n=34) and patients with MS (n=66), except for higher consumption of carbohydrates by patients. Both patients with MS and control subjects had higher protein and lower carbohydrate intake than the World Health Organization's recommended daily amounts. There was no correlation between food intake and neurological disability in patients with MS.

Conclusion: The dietary patterns of patients with MS and healthy controls were similar in the city of Santos, São Paulo, Brazil, and surrounding towns, except for higher intake of carbohydrates by patients. No profile of pro-inflammatory diets was identified among the patients with MS enrolled in this study.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Sat Dec 05, 2020 9:45 am

2020 Nov 10
Departments of Neurology and Immunobiology, Yale School Of Medicine, New Haven, United States of America
Oleic acid restores suppressive defects in tissue-resident FOXP3 regulatory T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33170805/

Abstract

FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) rely on fatty acid -oxidation (FAO)-driven oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for differentiation and function. Recent data demonstrate a role for Tregs in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis with tissue-resident Tregs possessing tissue-specific transcriptomes. However, specific signals that establish tissue-resident Treg programs remain largely unknown. Tregs metabolically rely on FAO, and considering the lipid-rich environments of tissues, we hypothesized that environmental lipids drive Treg homeostasis. First, using human adipose tissue to model tissue residency, we identified oleic acid as the most prevalent free fatty acid. Mechanistically, oleic acid amplified Treg FAO-driven OXPHOS metabolism, creating a positive feedback mechanism that increased the expression of FOXP3 and phosphorylation of STAT5, which enhanced Treg suppressive function. Comparing the transcriptomic program induced by oleic acid to the pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid, we found that Tregs sorted from peripheral blood and adipose of healthy donors transcriptomically resembled the oleic acid in vitro treated Tregs, whereas Tregs from the adipose of MS patients more closely resembled an arachidonic acid transcriptomic profile. Finally, we found oleic acid concentrations were reduced in the adipose of MS patients, and exposure of MS Tregs to oleic acid restored defects in their suppressive function. These data demonstrate the importance of fatty acids in regulating tissue inflammatory signals.

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Re: Diet

Post by NHE » Sat Dec 05, 2020 7:41 pm

Petr75 wrote:
Sat Dec 05, 2020 9:45 am
Oleic acid restores suppressive defects in tissue-resident FOXP3 regulatory T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33170805/



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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Thu Dec 10, 2020 11:28 am

2020 Nov 16
IRCCS Centro Neurolesi "Bonino-Pulejo", Via Provinciale Palermo, Contrada Casazza, Messina, Italy
Efficacy of Sulforaphane in Neurodegenerative Diseases
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33207780/

Abstract

Sulforaphane (SFN) is a phytocompound belonging to the isothiocyanate family. Although it was also found in seeds and mature plants, SFN is mainly present in sprouts of many cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. SFN is produced by the conversion of glucoraphanin through the enzyme myrosinase, which leads to the formation of this isothiocyanate. SFN is especially characterized by antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic properties, and for this reason, it aroused the interest of researchers. The aim of this review is to summarize the experimental studies present on Pubmed that report the efficacy of SFN in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Therefore, thanks to its beneficial effects, SFN could be useful as a supplement to counteracting neurodegenerative diseases.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:44 am

2020 Nov 21
Instituto de Biología y Genética Molecular (IBGM-CSIC/UVa), Valladolid, Spain
Oleacein Attenuates the Pathogenesis of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis through Both Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33233421/

Abstract

Oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines are factors affecting multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression. Oleacein (OLE), an olive secoiridoid, possesses powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which suggests its potential application to treat neuroinflammatory disorders. Herein, we investigated the impact of OLE on the main clinic-pathological features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS, including paralysis, demyelination, central nervous system (CNS) inflammation/oxidative stress and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown.

Methods: Mice were immunized with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide, MOG35-55, to induce EAE, and OLE was administrated from immunization day. Serum, optic nerve, spinal cord and cerebellum were collected to evaluate immunomodulatory activities at a systemic level, as well as within the CNS. Additionally, BV2 microglia and the retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 were used to confirm the direct effect of OLE on CNS-resident cells.

Results: We show that OLE treatment effectively reduced clinical score and histological signs typical of EAE. Histological evaluation confirmed a decrease in leukocyte infiltration, demyelination, BBB disruption and superoxide anion accumulation in CNS tissues of OLE-treated EAE mice compared to untreated ones. OLE significantly decreased expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-13, TNFα, GM-CSF, MCP-1 and IL-1β), while it increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Serum levels of anti-MOG35-55 antibodies were also lower in OLE-treated EAE mice. Further, OLE significantly diminished the presence of oxidative system parameters, while upregulated the ROS disruptor, Sestrin-3. Mechanistically, OLE prevented NLRP3 expression, phosphorylation of p65-NF-κB and reduced the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators induced by relevant inflammatory stimuli in BV2 cells. OLE did not affect viability or the phagocytic capabilities of BV2 microglia. In addition, apoptosis of RGC-5 induced by oxidative stressors was also prevented by OLE.

Conclusion: Altogether, our results show that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory OLE has neuroprotective effects in the CNS of EAE mice, pointing out this natural product as a candidate to consider for research on MS treatments.

---------------------------------------
https://ereska.net/viewtopic.php?f=17&t ... 7073#p7073

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Re: Diet

Post by NHE » Tue Dec 15, 2020 2:48 am

Petr75 wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:44 am
2020 Nov 21
Instituto de Biología y Genética Molecular (IBGM-CSIC/UVa), Valladolid, Spain
Oleacein Attenuates the Pathogenesis of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis through Both Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33233421/


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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Fri Dec 18, 2020 12:48 am

2020 Nov 27
Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Coenzyme Q10 enhances remyelination and regulate inflammation effects of cuprizone in corpus callosum of chronic model of multiple sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33245472/

Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that causes the most disability in young people, besides trauma. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)-also known as ubiquinone-is an endogenous lipid-soluble antioxidant in the mitochondrial oxidative respiratory chain which can reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, the processes associated with demyelination in MS. Cuprizone (CPZ) intoxication is a well-established model of inducing MS, best for studying demyelination-remyelination. In this study, we examined for the first time the role of CoQ10 in preventing demyelination and induction of remyelination in the chronic CPZ model of MS. 40 male mice were divided into four groups. 3 group chewed CPZ-containing food for 12 weeks to induce MS. After 4 weeks, one group were treated with CoQ10 (150 mg/kg/day) by daily gavage until the end of the experiment, while CPZ poisoning continued. At the end of 12 weeks, tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) was taken and animals were sacrificed to assess myelin basic protein (MBP), oligodendrocyte transcription factor-1 (Olig1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by Elisa test. Luxol fast blue (LFB) staining was used to evaluate histological changes. CoQ10 administration promoted remyelination in histological findings. MBP and Olig-1 expression were increased significantly in CoQ10 treated group compare to the CPZ-intoxicated group. CoQ10 treatment alleviated stress oxidative status induced by CPZ and dramatically suppress inflammatory biomarkers. CPZ ingestion made no significant difference between normal control group and the CPZ-intoxicated group in TST and OFT. CoQ10 can enhance remyelination in the CPZ model and potentially might have same effects in MS patients.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Sat Dec 26, 2020 7:30 am

2020 Dec 11
Physiotherapy Research Center, School of Rehabilitation, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Comparing the effects of vestibular rehabilitation with and without lavender oil scents as an olfactory stimulus on balance, fear of falling down and activities of daily living of people with multiple sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33305625/

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of using lavender oil as an olfactory stimulus with vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on balance, fear of falling down, and activities of daily living of people with multiple sclerosis.

Methods: Forty participants were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. The experimental group did the VR exercises while smelling the lavender oil scents. The control group did the VR exercises without it. Both groups did the exercises in ten 45-min sessions. We assessed the participants with the timed up and go (TUG) test, Berg balance scale (BBS), fall efficacy scale - international (FES-I), and the 29-item multiple sclerosis impact scale (MSIS-29). We did the tests at the baseline and after the last exercise session.

Results: The experimental group performed significantly better in the BBS (p = 0.007), TUG (p = 0.045), and FES-I (p = 0.016) tests as well as in the MSIS-29's psychological subscale (p = 0.034) than did the control group.

Conclusions: Using lavender oil as olfactory stimulus while doing the VR exercises can improve balance and reduce fear of falling down compared to doing the VR exercises without it in people with multiple sclerosis. Implications for rehabilitation It seems that using lavender oil, as an olfactory stimulus, while doing vestibular rehabilitation exercises can improve balance and reduce fear of falling down in people with multiple sclerosis compared to doing the vestibular rehabilitation exercises without it. This treatment significantly alleviates the psychological effects of multiple sclerosis on daily life such as sleeping problems, feeling unwell, anxious, tense, depressed, etc.
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Diet
https://ereska.net/viewtopic.php?f=17&t ... 3675#p3675

Diet /PM
https://ereska.net/viewtopic.php?f=40&t ... 207#p11207

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jan 05, 2021 7:27 am

2020 Dec 17
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West China Second University Hospital of Sichuan University and the Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Related Diseases of Women and Children, Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
Moringa oleifera Lam and its Therapeutic Effects in Immune Disorders
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33390944/

Abstract

Moringa oleifera Lam., a plant native to tropical forests of India, is characterized by its versatile application as a food additive and supplement therapy. Accumulating evidence shows that Moringa plays a critical role in immune-related diseases. In this review, we cover the history, constituents, edibility, and general medicinal value of Moringa. The effects of Moringa in treating immune disorders are discussed in detail. Moringa can not only eliminate pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites, but also inhibit chronic inflammation, such as asthma, ulcerative colitis, and metabolic diseases. Additionally, Moringa can attenuate physical and chemical irritation-induced immune disorders, such as metal intoxication, drug side effects, or even the adverse effect of food additives. Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, atopic dermatitis, and multiple sclerosis, can also be inhibited by Moringa. Collectively, Moringa, with its multiple immune regulatory bioactivities and few side effects, has a marked potential to treat immune disorders.



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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Sat Jan 09, 2021 9:54 am

2021 Feb 1
Charles Perkins Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Effects of dietary restriction on neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33416892/


Abstract

Recent and accumulating work in experimental animal models and humans shows that diet has a much more pervasive and prominent role than previously thought in modulating neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to some of the most common chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Chronic or intermittent food restriction has profound effects in shaping brain and peripheral metabolism, immunity, and gut microbiome biology. Interactions among calorie intake, meal frequency, diet quality, and the gut microbiome modulate specific metabolic and molecular pathways that regulate cellular, tissue, and organ homeostasis as well as inflammation during normal brain aging and CNS neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis, among others. This review discusses these findings and their potential application to the prevention and treatment of CNS neuroinflammatory diseases and the promotion of healthy brain aging.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:16 am

2020 Nov 20
Centre for Movement Occupational and Rehabilitation Sciences, Oxford, United Kingdom; Oxford Brookes Centre for Nutrition and Health, Oxford, United Kingdom
A cross sectional assessment of nutrient intake and the association of the inflammatory properties of nutrients and foods with symptom severity in a large cohort from the UK Multiple Sclerosis Registry
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33444968/

Abstract

To assess the intake of nutrients in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) compared to a control population, and to assess the pro/ anti-inflammatory properties of nutrients/ foods and their relationships with fatigue and quality of life. This was a cross sectional study in which 2410 pwMS (686 men; 1721 women, 3 n/a, mean age 53 (11 years)) provided dietary data using a food frequency questionnaire that was hosted on the MS Register for a period of 3 months and this was compared to a cohort of 24,852 controls (11,250 male, 13,602 female, mean age 59 years). Consent was implied by anonymously filling out the questionnaire. A Wilcoxon test was used to compare intake between pwMS and controls, and a bivariate analyses followed by chi2 test were undertaken to identify significance and the strength of the relationship between pro/anti-inflammatory dietary factors and fatigue and EQ-5D. Compared to controls, all nutrients were significantly lower in the MS group (P < .05). Bivariate associations showed a significant correlation between consuming fish and lower clinical fatigue (χ2(1) = 4.221, P< .05), with a very low association (φ (phi) = -0.051, P = .04. Positive health outcomes on the EQ-5D measures were associated with higher carotene, magnesium oily fish and fruits and vegetable and sodium consumption (P < .05). Fiber, red meat, and saturated fat (women only) consumption was associated with worse outcomes on the EQ-5D measures (P < .05). pwMS have different dietary intakes compared to controls, and this may be associated with worse symptoms.

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Re: Diet

Post by Petr75 » Mon Jan 18, 2021 12:25 pm

Petr75 wrote:
Tue Jan 05, 2021 7:27 am
2020 Dec 17
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West China Second University Hospital of Sichuan University and the Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Related Diseases of Women and Children, Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
Moringa oleifera Lam and its Therapeutic Effects in Immune Disorders
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33390944/

Abstract

Moringa oleifera Lam., a plant native to tropical forests of India, is characterized by its versatile application as a food additive and supplement therapy. Accumulating evidence shows that Moringa plays a critical role in immune-related diseases. In this review, we cover the history, constituents, edibility, and general medicinal value of Moringa. The effects of Moringa in treating immune disorders are discussed in detail. Moringa can not only eliminate pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites, but also inhibit chronic inflammation, such as asthma, ulcerative colitis, and metabolic diseases. Additionally, Moringa can attenuate physical and chemical irritation-induced immune disorders, such as metal intoxication, drug side effects, or even the adverse effect of food additives. Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, atopic dermatitis, and multiple sclerosis, can also be inhibited by Moringa. Collectively, Moringa, with its multiple immune regulatory bioactivities and few side effects, has a marked potential to treat immune disorders.



(I guess it's related, I'm not sure..)



2021 Jan 12
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California
The Wnt effector TCF7l2 promotes oligodendroglial differentiation by repressing autocrine BMP4-mediated signaling
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33452226/


Abstract

Promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation represents a promising option for remyelination therapy for treating the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The Wnt effector TCF7l2 was upregulated in MS lesions and had been proposed to inhibit oligodendrocyte differentiation. Recent data suggest the opposite yet underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we unravel a previously unappreciated function of TCF7l2 in controlling autocrine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4)-mediated signaling. Disrupting TCF7l2 in mice of both sexes results in oligodendroglial-specific BMP4 upregulation and canonical BMP4 signaling activation in vivo Mechanistically, TCF7l2 binds to Bmp4 gene regulatory element and directly represses its transcriptional activity. Functionally, enforced TCF7l2 expression promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation by reducing autocrine BMP4 secretion and dampening BMP4 signaling. Importantly, compound genetic disruption demonstrates that oligodendroglial-specific BMP4 deletion rescues arrested oligodendrocyte differentiation elicited by TCF7l2 disruption in vivo Collectively, our study reveals a novel connection between TCF7l2 and BMP4 in oligodendroglial lineage and provides new insights into augmenting TCF7l2 for promoting remyelination in demyelinating disorders such as MS.Significance Statement: Incomplete or failed myelin repairs, primarily resulting from the arrested differentiation of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes from oligodendroglial progenitor cells, is one of the major reasons for neurological progression in people affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). Using in vitro culture systems and in vivo animal models, this study unraveled a previously unrecognized autocrine regulation of BMP4-mediated signaling by the Wnt effector TCF7l2. We showed for the first time that TCF7l2 promotes oligodendroglial differentiation by repressing BMP4-mediated activity, which is dysregulated in MS lesions. Our study suggests that elevating TCF7l2 expression may be possible in overcoming arrested oligodendroglial differentiation as observed in MS patients.


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