Environmental and genetic risk factors

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Petr75
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Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by Petr75 » Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:32 am

2019 Sep
Department of Neurology, UC San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Environmental and genetic risk factors for MS: an integrated review.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6764632/

Abstract
Recent findings have provided a molecular basis for the combined contributions of multifaceted risk factors for the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS appears to start as a chronic dysregulation of immune homeostasis resulting from complex interactions between genetic predispositions, infectious exposures, and factors that lead to pro-inflammatory states, including smoking, obesity, and low sun exposure. This is supported by the discovery of gene-environment (GxE) interactions and epigenetic alterations triggered by environmental exposures in individuals with particular genetic make-ups. It is notable that several of these pro-inflammatory factors have not emerged as strong prognostic indicators. Biological processes at play during the relapsing phase of the disease may result from initial inflammatory-mediated injury, while risk factors for the later phase of MS, which is weighted toward neurodegeneration, are not yet well defined. This integrated review of current evidence guides recommendations for clinical practice and highlights research gaps.

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Leonard
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Re: Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by Leonard » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:36 pm

This nitty gritty stuff only adds to the confusion. We should begin at a higher abstraction level.

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NHE
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Re: Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by NHE » Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:00 pm

Well I have several factors stacked up against me, e.g., bottle fed as an infant, a severe head injury as a child, organic solvent and air pollution exposure from 10 years in auto repair, live in northern latitude (47.6 & 48.7 °N) therefore low Vitamin D, EBV infection during preteen years and low omega-3 consumption. I'd like to also count HBV (as a teen) and measles (as an adult) vaccines (my first symptoms were about 6 weeks after the measles vaccine). In addition, I also cut a nerve in my wrist in an accident with a hatchet which exposed my immune system to damaged myelin. Maybe it all pushed me towards MS, maybe it didn't.

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Petr75
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Re: Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by Petr75 » Thu Oct 17, 2019 9:55 am

In a word: location
Otherwise: cards were dealt before birth, still later it was just a bad game (smoking, stress ..) and mainly something that still a little irritates the immune system

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Leonard
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Re: Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by Leonard » Fri Oct 18, 2019 1:45 am

Petr75 wrote:
Thu Oct 17, 2019 9:55 am
.. cards were dealt before birth, still later it was just a bad game..
Correct.

In my case, the left Internal Jugular Vein (IJV) is dominant. Which is strange. Normally they should be equal. So why is that? Because the right IJV was blocked, a birth defect. During the foetal phase, the left IJV grew larger, to compensate for the blockage on the right.
The blockage of the right IJV was a truncation, almost the perfect truncation as in the text books. I still keep a picture of the situation before it was opened, say from before I was liberated from CCSVI.

My family lived for generations in the shadow of the heavy metal industry. So yes, location matters.
The studies from the industrial cluster south of Boston and from Texas (that you may find on the other thread on a new concept for MS) show a clear causal relationship between living in the vicinity of the heavy metal industry and vascular insufficiencies, that may even be passed from generation to generation. My grandfather died from a NasoPharyngeal Carcinoma which is rare on our lattitudes and I attribute to a weakened immunity of the nasopharynx. Why? Exactly, because of hypoperfusion due to IJV blockage. Which was then genetically passed on to me.
My two eldest children don't have it, they were checked by the best doctor who must have seen and liberated over a 1000 MS patients. My youngest daughter still needs to be checked.

Pitty that CCSVI was completely denied or ignored by neurologists and the medical sector. Because it is most definitely a factor that may lead to MS. But yes, I would agree, the situation is complicated and the cascade is long and bring us billions of years back to the very roots of the development of biological life. See also the other thread on a new concept for MS.
Why did I get MS? It must have started with the blocked IJV. And after BBB breach, herpes found its way. And I got neurological symptoms. But my immune system dealt with the situation. Until a bad gut developed at mid-age, there may be some relation with EBV on Peyer's Patches and IgA deficiency. And epigenetic control weakened. But even then, my immune system managed. But the nerves must have been 'thin'.
Then, around 2000, I was vaccinated three times for Hepatitis B. At the age of 45. Three years later there was the big flare up and I was diagnosed with MS. Why? Adjuvants may have been a factor but it is more likely the vaccination introduced a retro virus (either Hepatitis or a smaller retro virus carried by double stranded Hepatitis B virus) that entered cells, was cut into pieces and fragments then fitted on open genes that then changed cell function. Cells came to expression and T cells came to rescue and caused the flare up and the lesions. And the all the rest followed, including the later progressive phase. Why that is? For further information, see the thread on a new concept for MS.

Is this all delusional thinking? I don't think so. I firmly believe that this is what caused my own MS. And I firmly believe that the viral argument fits many other autoimmune diseases as in viewtopic.php?f=1&t=15188&start=885#p258372

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Petr75
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Re: Environmental and genetic risk factors

Post by Petr75 » Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:13 am

2019 Jul-Sep
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Factors Involved in Relapse of Multiple Sclerosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6753697/

Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune disorder, affects the central nervous system (CNS). It affects the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerve, leading to problems with vision, balance, muscle control, and other basic bodily functions. MS relapse (MSR) involves an acute inflammatory demyelinating reaction within the CNS. This review focuses on the main factors involved in MSR based on a detailed literature search. Evidence suggests that MSR is influenced by age, sex, pregnancy, serum levels of Vitamin D, interactions between genetic and environmental factors, and infectious diseases. Many of these factors are modifiable and require the attention of patients and health-care providers if favorable outcomes are to be realized. Identification of MSR risk factors can help in the development of therapies that could be used to manage MS and MSR.

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