Mastery

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Petr75
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Mastery

Post by Petr75 » Mon Dec 02, 2019 10:28 pm

2019 Oct 31
Neuroepidemiology Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne
Mastery is associated with greater physical and mental health-related quality of life in two international cohorts of people with multiple sclerosis.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31756608

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Mastery is the sense of being in control of one's life and improvement in mastery may help to enhance quality of life. Little research has explored mastery in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), including its association with quality of life.
OBJECTIVE:
To explore the association between mastery and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in people with MS.
METHOD:
Two cross-sectional cohorts of adults with MS (n = 1401 and n = 573), recruited through convenience sampling, completed an online survey which measured mastery using the Pearlin Mastery Scale, physical and mental HRQOL via physical and mental health composite scores of MSQOL-54, along with other covariates, including demographics, clinical characteristics and lifestyle factors. Linear regression assessed associations between mastery and physical HRQOL adjusting for age, sex, education, disability and depression, and between mastery and mental HRQOL adjusting for age, sex, education, disability and clinically significant fatigue.
RESULTS:
Greater mastery score was associated with higher physical and mental HRQOL in both cohorts, such that a one-point increase in the PMS was associated with an increase of 2.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.6, 3.1) and 2.8 points (95% CI: 2.4, 3.2) in the means of physical HRQOL score in the first and second cohorts respectively, and a 2.9-point (95% CI: 2.7, 3.1) and 3.1-point (95% CI: 2.7, 3.4) increase in the means of mental HRQOL score. A dose-dependent relationship was demonstrated between a quartile categorical mastery variable and both physical and mental HRQOL in both cohorts. Mastery was associated with all subscores of both physical and mental HRQOL.
CONCLUSIONS:
Greater mastery is associated with better physical and mental quality of life. Efforts to improve the sense of self control and agency of people with MS may have benefits for their quality of life, even despite clinical features of the illness.
https://www.eboro.cz/ms/

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Petr75
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Re: Mastery

Post by Petr75 » Thu Nov 25, 2021 4:47 am

2021 Nov 23
Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Greater mastery is associated with lower depression risk in a large international cohort of people with multiple sclerosis over 2.5 years
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34813035/

Abstract

Background: Mastery is the extent to which an individual perceives their life circumstances as being under their control and not predominantly influenced by external factors. The relationship of mastery with clinical outcomes in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) has not been well-researched. We assessed the relationships of mastery with fatigue, disability, relapse number, and depression risk among pwMS over 2.5 years' follow-up.

Methods: Data from the Health Outcomes and Lifestyle in a Sample of people with Multiple sclerosis study, among 839 participants who completed the 2.5 and 5-year reviews, were analysed. Mastery was measured by the Pearlin Mastery Scale, fatigue by Fatigue Severity Scale, depression risk by Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and disability by Patient-Determined Disease Steps, and diagnosed relapse number in the previous 12 months was queried. Cross-sectional and prospective analyses were undertaken by log-binomial, log-multinomial, and Poisson regression, as appropriate, adjusted for relevant confounders.

Results: Cross-sectionally, pwMS with the highest quartile mastery (> 25/28) had 90% lower frequency of depression risk, 60% lower frequency of clinically significant fatigue, and 77% fewer had severe disability, all largely robust to adjustment. Prospectively, those in the top two quartiles of mastery (> 21-25, > 25/28) had 66% and 74% lower subsequent depression risk, robust to adjustment. No significant associations were seen prospectively for change in fatigue, disability, or relapse number, however, and no robust associations of mastery with relapse number were evident.

Conclusions: Prospectively, a protective relationship of mastery with subsequent risk of depression was observed, suggesting this may be a point of intervention to improve wellbeing in pwMS.
https://www.eboro.cz/ms/

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