Aquatic Therapy

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Petr75
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Posts: 955
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Aquatic Therapy

Post by Petr75 » Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:23 pm

2020 Jun 14.
University of Washington School of Medicine
Aquatic Therapy in Contemporary Neurorehabilitation: An Update
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32536028/


Abstract

Aquatic therapy has been used extensively in a number of neurologic diseases and pathologies. This review will describe disease-specific rehabilitative applications for this population. Recent research has offered scientific support for use in common neurological diseases that are part of rehabilitative practice, and very recent findings may create even firmer support for its use in these as well as other conditions. Stroke, Parkinsonism, and multiple sclerosis are areas that have recently received a significant number of published studies. Dementia is another area that has been more recently studied and received basic science support. Cerebral palsy has also had recent supportive evidence published. Available literature is reviewed to create a more evidence-based support for the use of aquatic therapy in neurorehabilitation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Petr75
Family Elder
Posts: 955
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: Aquatic Therapy

Post by Petr75 » Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:32 am

Jul-Aug 2020
Helen Genova, Rosalia Dacosta-Aguayo, Yael Goverover, Angela Smith, Chris Bober, John DeLuca
Effects of a Single Bout of Aquatic Exercise on Mood in Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32863785/

Abstract

Background: Physical activity is known to be an effective way of managing multiple sclerosis (MS)-related symptoms. Furthermore, it has been reported that even a single bout of physical activity can yield improvements in mood in persons with MS. Aquatic exercise can be an effective and enjoyable physical activity in persons with MS. However, there is little research on the immediate effects of aquatic exercise on mood in people with MS. Thus, we assessed the acute effects of a single bout of aquatic exercise on mood.

Methods: Eight adults with MS participated in a 45-minute aquatic exercise class as well as 45 minutes of a seated rest control condition. The Profile of Mood States questionnaire was given before and after each condition (rest and aquatic exercise). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired-samples t tests were used to examine whether aquatic exercise resulted in improvement in mood. Due to the small sample size, effect sizes were considered.

Results: Moderate-to-large effect sizes indicated a condition × time interaction such that mood increased and fatigue decreased after a single bout of aquatic exercise compared with after rest.

Conclusions: This proof-of-concept study suggests that mood symptoms are improved immediately after a short bout of aquatic exercise. Future research is needed to explore whether these effects are reliable and whether they can be sustained with more frequent bouts of aquatic exercise.



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