Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Using exercise and physical therapy for recovery from the effects of MS, and for maintaining physical function.
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danielashell
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Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by danielashell » Wed Dec 21, 2016 8:22 am

Hello Everyone!
I will try to make a long story short here.
I'm a 38 yr old mother of 3, and have worked in the fitness industry for approx 6 yrs now. In those 6 yrs I have been very active and always considered myself to be in optimal shape. I was up until this past yr basically one of the strongest women in my area in competition. I do very heavy Olympic lifts and so on. Blah blah.
I've had a few injuries in the past 3 yrs.
Anyway...I am now going through the process of ruling out MS, I have 2 MRI'S scheduled for tomorrow. While trying to rule out MS so far they have found 3 "old" fractures in my vertebrae. No clue how old..that was doctors words.
A fracture in L1 which they claim can only come from blunt force or trauma and c5-6 have now fused themselves together trying to heal themselves (possibly causing nerve damage) I guess I'll find out more soon.
The thing that led me to the doctor in the first place was not back pain but pretty much (what I am learning now) is ALL of the "basic" MS symptoms.
Yes, I understand there are like a million other ailments that mock MS and yes I now know vitamin deficiencies are one of them. They have done 2 blood panels so far. I do not HAVE the records but they claim they are normal. I have an appt w GP in a few weeks, I will inquire more then.
I am having a LOT of issues in the last yr...starting slowly and now like a wrecking ball...almost debilitating at times.
My question is, if any of you have any knowledge of such a case where there have been sports related injuries that caused ms like symptoms. The whole 9 yards, sight vision impairment, extreme lethargy, hands won't work, tremors, spasms, pain, diziness, chest pain, itchiness, night sweats, electric shocks....to name a few.
I know they said blunt force or trauma, but I just wonder....is it possible to fracture ur spine by lifting very heavy loads when u have a small frame and also a possible vitamin D deficiency that may lead to poor bone health???
Second question....a good friend of mine that owns a gym has a power plate and he wants me to come try it. I live in a small area and am well known for my training. People have been "talking" lately about my noticeable decline, and so he has reached out to me to try this machine.
Has it helped anyone that you know of, and what are the benefits?
Thanks in advance!      

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jimmylegs
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Re: Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Dec 21, 2016 3:43 pm

hey there :) just dropping some forum search results for your perusal. predictably nutrition-y :D but with the athlete spin in particular
http://www.thisisms.com/forum/search.ph ... =jimmylegs
http://www.thisisms.com/forum/search.ph ... =jimmylegs
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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NHE
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Re: Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by NHE » Wed Dec 21, 2016 8:57 pm

danielashell wrote:Yes, I understand there are like a million other ailments that mock MS and yes I now know vitamin deficiencies are one of them. They have done 2 blood panels so far. I do not HAVE the records but they claim they are normal. I have an appt w GP in a few weeks, I will inquire more then.
I am having a LOT of issues in the last yr...starting slowly and now like a wrecking ball...almost debilitating at times.
My question is, if any of you have any knowledge of such a case where there have been sports related injuries that caused ms like symptoms. The whole 9 yards, sight vision impairment, extreme lethargy, hands won't work, tremors, spasms, pain, diziness, chest pain, itchiness, night sweats, electric shocks....to name a few.
All of your symptoms are consistent with a possible vitamin B12 deficiency. It would be best to know what your actual B12 test results were. The standard laboratory range for B12 runs from around 225-850 pg/mL. However, if you're experiencing neurological symptoms, then you really want B12 to be 500-1000 pg/mL. As such, it's possible to test in the low end of the range, but still be deficient. You may be interested in watching a short documentary film which introduces the problems caused by low B12.
  • "Everything You Want Your Doctor to Know about Vitamin B12"

If your B12 level is OK, i.e., 500-1000 pg/mL, then you can consider other diagnoses. Note that a complete B12 panel typically also includes red blood cell (RBC) folate, homocysteine and methylmalonic acid (MMA).

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jimmylegs
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Re: Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Dec 21, 2016 9:28 pm

will be good to have those results :) here is a link to the nutrition forum specifically if interested http://www.thisisms.com/forum/natural-approach-f27/
lots there to read about the b and e that you're on already, plus others :)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

User avatar
jimmylegs
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Posts: 12031
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by jimmylegs » Thu Dec 22, 2016 7:43 am

Nerve Injuries in Weight Training
Sites, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3 ... 005.07.141
"Direct trauma, compression caused by muscle hypertrophy or other soft tissue changes, or excessive stretching of a peripheral nerve in the upper extremity may lead to uncommon—but potentially serious—complications. Clinicians are seeing more of these injuries as weight training, power lifting, bodybuilding, cross-training, and general physical conditioning with weights become more popular. Symptoms of pain, weakness, paresthesia, or palsy; physical exam findings; electromyography; and nerve conduction studies are used to make the diagnosis. Most conditions respond well to conservative measures, such as rest from the offending exercise and correction of poor technique, but surgery may be required for complete clinical resolution in severe cases."

this next is from a generic search about weight training and nutrition. magnesium was one of two essential nutrients in the resulting article titles. the other, vit d3.

study using 8mg/kg body weight/day (sounds like a familiar ballpark, but good old magnesium oxide :P so not much absorbed):

Effect of magnesium supplementation on strength training in humans.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1 ... 2.10718233
"This study investigated the effects of dietary magnesium (Mg) on strength development during a double-blind, 7-week strength training program in 26 untrained subjects (14 = control, C and 12 = Mg supplemented, M), 18-30 years old. Subjects' 3-day diet records were analyzed and Mg content was calculated. C received a placebo and M received a supplement (Mg oxide) to bring Mg intake, including diet, to 8 mg/kg body weight/day. Body composition was assessed with bioelectrical impedance. Pre and post quadriceps torque (T) measurements were made with an Orthotron at 120 deg/sec. Each subject performed three sets of 10 reps, leg press and leg extension, three times/week. Both groups gained strength, however, results indicated a significant (p less than 0.05) increase for the M group compared to the C group in absolute T, relative T adjusted for body weight (T/BWT), and relative T adjusted for lean body mass (T/LBM) when pre values were used as the covariate. M was consistently greater than C (T: 211 vs 174 Nm; T/BWT: 3.07 vs 2.58 Nm/kg; T/LBM: 3.84 vs 3.36 Nm/kg). Conclusion: Significant differences in T gains after strength training were demonstrated in M vs C. Mg's role may be at the ribosomal level in protein synthesis." (emphasis added = 3 day diet diaries and nutrition calculations me likey)

another result from the generic list, pretty interesting

Vitamin and mineral status: effects on physical performance
http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(04%2900092-9/abstract?cc=y=
"Public health recommendations encourage the selection of a balanced diet and increasing physical activity to foster health and well-being. Whereas the adverse effects of restricted intakes of protein, fat, and carbohydrate on physical performance are well known, there is limited information about the impact of low intakes of vitamins and minerals on the exercise capacity and performance of humans. Physically active people generally consume amounts of vitamins and minerals consistent with the recommendations for the general public. (edit actually no most people *don't* get up to public health recommendations - recent study 99.5% and up do not meet daily requirements - and i would think that includes physically active people) However, when intakes are less than recommendations, some noticeable functional impairments occur. Acute or short-term marginal deficiencies, identified by blood biochemical measures of vitamin B status, had no impacts on performance measures. Severe deprivation of folate and vitamin B12 result in anemia and reduce endurance work performance. Evidence of vitamin A and E deficiencies in athletic individuals is lacking apparently because body storage is appreciable. In contrast to vitamins, marginal mineral deficiencies impair performance. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, impairs muscle function and limits work capacity. Magnesium deprivation increases oxygen requirements to complete submaximal exercise and reduces endurance performance. Use of vitamin and mineral supplements does not improve measures of performance in people consuming adequate diets. Young girls and individuals participating in activities with weight classifications or aesthetic components are prone to nutrient deficiencies because they restrict food intake and specific micronutrient-rich foods. This information will be useful to professionals who counsel physically active people and scientific groups who make dietary recommendations to improve health and optimize genetic potential."
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: Extreme Exercise and MS symptoms & Q's about Power Plate

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:23 am

huh! don't think i recall having heard of hypophosphatemia before:

Severe hypophosphatemia and acute neurologic dysfunction in a marathon runner
http://journals.lww.com/cjsportsmed/Cit ... ic.18.aspx
"The differential diagnosis of acute neurologic dysfunction in endurance athletes is broad but includes heatstroke, cerebrovascular accident, and electrolyte disturbance, among others. Although hyponatremia has been established as a reason for altered mental status (AMS) in endurance events, hypophosphatemia alone, to our knowledge, has not been reported as a cause of neurologic disturbance. We present a case of acute weakness and paresthesias mimicking stroke in a marathon runner with severe hypophosphatemia."
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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