all things vitamin D

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lyndacarol
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Re: all things vitamin D

Post by lyndacarol » Fri Dec 28, 2018 2:01 pm

jimmylegs wrote:Vitamin D and remyelination in multiple sclerosis (2018)

Abstract
Introduction

Several studies have found an association between multiple sclerosis and vitamin D (VD) deficiency, which suggests that VD may play a role in the immune response. However, few studies have addressed its role in remyelination.

Development
The VD receptor and the enzymes transforming VD into metabolites which activate the VD receptor are expressed in central nervous system (CNS) cells, which suggests a potential effect of VD on the CNS. Both in vitro and animal model studies have shown that VD may play a role in myelination by acting on factors that influence the microenvironment which promotes both proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and oligodendrocytes. It remains unknown whether the mechanisms of internalisation of VD in the CNS are synergistic with or antagonistic to the mechanisms that facilitate the entry of VD metabolites into immune cells.

Conclusions
VD seems to play a role in the CNS and our hypothesis is that VD is involved in remyelination. Understanding the basic mechanisms of VD in myelination is necessary to manage multiple sclerosis patients with VD deficiency.
Here is the URL to this article, Vitamin D and remyelinationIn multiple sclerosis, written by Matias-Guiu J, Oreja-Guevara C, Matias-Guiu JA, Gomez-Pinedo U.:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27321170

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jimmylegs
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Re: all things vitamin D

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:06 am

re http://www.thisisms.com/forum/natural-a ... ml#p256137
i am interested in the range within which vit d3 could be helpful vs harmful to myelin processes. as with any essential, i expect d3's interaction with myelin is a u-shaped phenomenon.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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Petr75
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Re: all things vitamin D

Post by Petr75 » Tue Jan 01, 2019 1:17 pm

2018 Dec
Academic MS Center Limburg, Zuyderland Medical Center, Sittard, the Netherlands; School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Correlation of different cellular assays to analyze T cell-related cytokine profiles in vitamin D3-supplemented patients with multiple sclerosis.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30550982

Abstract
Different laboratory approaches have been exploited to analyze an effect of vitamin D3 supplements on T cell cytokine profiles in multiple sclerosis, with poorly reproducible results. We assessed the correlation between intra-cellular flowcytometry analysis of CD4 T cell-enriched CD3+CD8- lymphocytes after PMA/ionomycin stimulation directly ex-vivo or after 72 h pre-stimulation with anti-CD3, and cytokine levels excreted in culture supernatants. Pre-stimulation with anti-CD3 resulted in higher proportions of cells positive for IFN-γ, IL-17 A, IL-4, IL-10 and GM-CSF (all P < 0.001), but not TNF-α. Positive correlation between approaches was highly variable, but most eminent for IFN- γ and IL-4 (R = 0.608-0.612 and R = 0.677-0.777, resp., all P < 0.001). No effect of 16-weeks vitamin D3 supplements on any outcome was found except for a decreased TNF-α concentration in culture supernatants. Choice of immune-assay is, apparently, a relevant confounder for the reproducibility of individual studies.

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2019: Vitamin D - Enough is Enough

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:54 am

once again, a disappointing absence of cofactor info other than calcium.
as for level, i'd probably go with 100-150 nmol/l but ok.
pretty sure the diet only idea is terrible advice, but for those who can demonstrably achieve that range with diet, power to them.
personally, i definitely need to do a better job on plain old UV exposure when i have the opportunity.

Vitamin D Supplementation in Central Nervous System Demyelinating Disease—Enough Is Enough (2019)
https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/20/1/218/htm

Therefore, we recommend a vitamin D serum level between 75–125 nmol/L, as proposed by other clinicians [126]. This range of vitamin D has been associated with low risk of developing MS and low disease activity and can be easily reached with adequate sun exposure and vitamin D balanced diet without any additional vitamin D supplementation.

3. Conclusions
There is little doubt that a low vitamin D status is a risk factor for development and progression of MS. In part, this may reflect a true deficit in vitamin D itself, on the other hand, low vitamin D levels may be indicative of a lack of sun exposure, which appears to mediate beneficial effects independent or in addition to raising the vitamin D levels. Although, controlled supplementation studies in patients with MS suggest that therapeutically raising vitamin D in affected patients may positively influence the course of disease, conclusive evidence is unfortunately still lacking. Emerging studies caution that higher dose vitamin D supplementation may have the opposite clinical effect via secondary hypercalcemia having a T cell-stimulating effect. This novel concept of a relatively narrow therapeutic window for vitamin D, may also shed light on the question of why clinical trials often using higher doses of vitamin D failed or yielded conflicting results. In conclusion, vitamin D should be supplemented at moderate doses in a serum level-controlled manner. Patients should be also assessed for hypercalcemia, which should be strictly avoided. In the big picture, moderate sun exposure, combined with a diverse diet including vitamin D precursors, in conjunction with a regular assessment of vitamin D serum levels, might be the best balanced and advisable strategy for patients with MS.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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2018 study: vitamin D3, axonal damage, de-/remyelination

Post by jimmylegs » Tue Feb 05, 2019 1:40 pm

good to know:
  • Effects of vitamin D on axonal damage during de- and remyelination in the cuprizone model (2018)
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 2818301826

    Highlights
    • Cuprizone mice fed high dose vs. low dose cholecalciferol had significantly less axonal damage.
    • High dose calcitriol, given after the demyelination phase, did not influence axonal loss or regeneration.
    •To protect against axonal loss high dose vitamin D had to be given before and during demyelination.
free full text is out there for anyone interested in the nitty gritty. at first glance, i'm not 100% clear on how to interpret the high dose regimen.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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2016: vit D & b-cell immunoreactivity in MS

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:56 am

  • Hypovitaminosis D upscales B-cell immunoreactivity in multiple sclerosis (2016)
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 2816300455

    Highlights
    •B cells from MS patients with hypovitaminosis D exhibit enhanced immune responses ex vivo.
    •Hypovitaminosis D coincides with low vitamin D levels and increased frequencies of mature B-cell subtypes in the cerebrospinal fluid.
    •Vitamin D-supplementation attenuates B-cell immunoreactivities.

    Results
    B cells from MS patients with 25(OH)D serum levels < 20 ng/ml, displayed enhanced immunoreactivity ex vivo as a consequence of more vigorous responses of CD27+ memory phenotypes. Immune responses decreased when B cells from either source were co-cultured in the presence of vitamin D or when retesting B cells from MS patients after prolonged supplementation with vitamin D. Hypovitaminosis D was detectable in the serum of 40/95 MS patients, correlated with decreased vitamin D concentrations in CSF and with higher disease activity, and was paralleled by intrathecal accumulation of CD27+ B-cell subtypes and plasma cells.
if you're wondering, per the line of best fit, b-cell proliferation and il-6 release continued to drop as serum d3 levels increased

mean (range) for all participants: 25(OH)D [ng/ml] Serum 31.1 (4.7–92.4)
and for supplemented participants 38.8 (15.3–92.4)

"Dosage for vitamin D supplementation ranged from 1000 IU per day to 20,000 IU per week"

(interesting, since in other research 20K IU/wk couldn't reliably get all participants above 100 nmol/l ie 40 ng/ml. not sure if i could check whether anyone in that other work attained or came close to 90 ng/ml via 20K IU/wk)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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