all things magnesium

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jimmylegs
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Tue May 13, 2014 2:46 am

hi lynn :)

i get my multi at a local specialty store where they sell a lot of higher end supplements, plus organic toiletries/cosmetics/groceries etc. three times daily yes. i put out a little dish for each day and whenever i have food or drink i try to also take one or two supplement pills.

most of my regular vit d3 is in my multi at this stage, plus whatever i get in food (eg mushrooms etc). i have a very high potency liquid also, i put it in a needle to dose out a really small single drop of about 5000IU. i dont use it as much as i used to. i have a lab requisition for blood work soon, to check if i need to take it more frequently.

i personally don't take ala.. since it can, my body has to make its own :D
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THX1138
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by THX1138 » Thu May 22, 2014 8:36 am

Recipe for Magnesium/Bicarbonate Water
This is a form of magnesium that is highly absorbable.

This recipe allows one to easily make the water, instead of paying high prices for bottled mineral water.
http://www.afibbers.org/Wallerwater.pdf

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by THX1138 » Fri Jul 25, 2014 3:08 pm

As I write this message, the 3 topics at the top of the TiMS active topics page are as follows: Bladder spasms, Walking and Spasticity, and Spasticity. It seems some relaxation is needed. So, how about:

Magnesium: Meet the Most Powerful Relaxation Mineral Available
http://drhyman.com/blog/2010/05/20/magn ... ble/#close

or, the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUWL1o2hSrs

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Dec 27, 2014 11:17 am

i have posted this study elsewhere previously but am filing it here also:

Correlation of serum magnesium with serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in hemodialysis patients
http://www.nikanrescorp.com/index.php/N ... cle/view/9
To find the association of serum magnesium levels, with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, in patients on regular hemodialysis, we conducted a study on 41 stable hemodialysis patients. We found a significant positive correlation of serum magnesium with 25-OH vitamin D (r= 0.40 p= 0.009). While magnesium deficiency increases serum fibroblast growth factor 23 concentration. Thus, the positive association of magnesium deficiency and fibroblast growth factor 23, further indicate the significance of magnesium and vitamin D deficiency, especially in hemodialysis patients.

discussion, from the full text pdf http://www.nikanrescorp.com/index.php/N ... ewFile/9/9
"In this study, we found the significant positive correlation of serum magnesium with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in study patients. This correlation was strongly positive in non-diabetic, diabetic, female, and male groups studied population. To test the relationship of serum magnesium and vitamin D levels in 330 students, Kelishadi et al., detected the significant positive association of magnesium with 25(OH) D serum level (18). Likewise, Gandhe et al., conducted a study to examine the possible association of vitamin D3, and magnesium in type II diabetes mellitus patients. They noticed to a positive correlation of vitamin D with serum magnesium levels. They interpreted that, vitamin D levels can also affects the magnesium status (19). Fibroblast growth factor-23 is linked to the atherosclerosis and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients and healthy subjects (20,21). It was found that, magnesium deficiency increases serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels too (20,21). Thus the positive association of magnesium deficiency and fibroblast growth factor 23 (20,21), further indicate the significance of magnesium and vitamin D deficiency, especially in hemodialysis patients."
take control of your own health
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by THX1138 » Thu Jan 01, 2015 9:26 pm

What follows is an email I received from Dr. Dean:

Magnesium in Man & Woman
January 1, 2015

Aloha,

Sometimes I receive “signs” and today I’ll share one with you. On the first day of the 2015 New Year someone sent me a 2015 publication from Physiology Review called “Magnesium in Man: Implications for Health and Disease.” [http://physrev.physiology.org/content/95/1/1]

So, I guess this means 2015 will be another year of mostly magnesium blogs!

What I LOVE about this paper is the corroborating statement that “…magnesium…is involved in over 600 enzymatic reactions.” For over a year I’ve been quoting one source that contends magnesium is responsible for 700-800 enzymatic reactions. But 600 is close enough. Hopefully all the papers and books that have stuck with the 300 enzymatic reactions for the past few decades will update their statistics.

I’ll give you the abstract with my comments. The paper is 45 pages long but it costs $20.00 to look at it for a day. Even so, it’s an important paper you want to give a solid reference to your doctor or to the skeptic that you live with.

Abstract: “Magnesium (Mg2+) is an essential ion to the human body, playing an instrumental role in supporting and sustaining health and life.”

Comment: Mg2 ions are what the body requires at the cellular level. Knowing that, a lot of companies are now selling ionic magnesium. However, an ion is very unstable and will bind with other ions in the body making it unavailable to the cell. The complex and expensive process used to create ReMag stabilizes magnesium and it’s absorbed seamlessly into the cell.

Abstract: “As the second most abundant intracellular cation after potassium, it is involved in over 600 enzymatic reactions including energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Although Mg2+ availability has been proven to be disturbed during several clinical situations, serum Mg2+ values are not generally determined in patients.”

Comment: That’s right, doctors usually don’t even bother to test for magnesium. And this review does not define the various types of magnesium testing or indicate that Magnesium RBC is better than serum magnesium and Ionized Magnesium testing is the best of all.

Abstract: “This review aims to provide an overview of the function of Mg2+ in human health and disease. In short, Mg2+ plays an important physiological role particularly in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscles. Moreover, Mg2+supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in treatment of, among others, preeclampsia, migraine, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma.

Comment: Yhe list is longer in the paper, but admitting that magnesium is a treatment for depression and asthma is huge.

Abstract: “Over the last decade, several hereditary forms of hypomagnesemia have been deciphered, including mutations in transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6), claudin 16, and cyclin M2 (CNNM2). Recently, mutations in Mg2+ transporter 1 (MagT1) were linked to T-cell deficiency underlining the important role of Mg2+ in cell viability.

Comment: The work on mutations is very interesting because it will soon be accepted that magnesium is a major epigenetic trigger to turn genes on and off.

Abstract: “Moreover, hypomagnesemia can be the consequence of the use of certain types of drugs, such as diuretics, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, calcineurin inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors.”

Comment: Every year the list of drugs that cause magnesium deficiency grows and contributes to the side effects of drugs.

Abstract: “This review provides an extensive and comprehensive overview of Mg2+ research over the last few decades, focusing on the regulation of Mg2+ homeostasis in the intestine, kidney, and bone and disturbances which may result in hypomagnesemia.

Comment: Researchers can study the regulation of magnesium homeostasis all they want but until they acknowledge that the body needs optimum water intake, sea salt and other minerals, such as the ones in ReLyte, they won’t come up with any worthwhile answers.

In the meantime, my message doesn’t waiver – take responsibility for your own health. Join my Completement Now Online Wellness Program and take Completement Formulas so you can avoid drugs and hospitals in 2015.

Carolyn Dean MD ND
The Doctor of the Future™

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jimmylegs
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Jan 02, 2015 6:19 am

the info is good, but i find the upselling offputting.
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by THX1138 » Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:15 am

Magnesium's Secret Affect on Calcium, Potassium, & Vit D

http://www.jigsawhealth.com/resources/m ... dium=email

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Jan 05, 2015 9:42 am

somebody needs a proofreader!
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lyndacarol
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Re: all things magnesium

Post by lyndacarol » Mon Jan 05, 2015 10:16 am

THX1138 wrote:Magnesium's Secret Affect on Calcium, Potassium, & Vit D

http://www.jigsawhealth.com/resources/m ... dium=email
One of the sources:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3904000067

Low magnesium promotes endothelial cell dysfunction: implications for atherosclerosis, inflammation and thrombosis
________________________________________
Abstract
Because (i) endothelial cells are important players in cardiovascular diseases and (ii) Mg deficiency promotes atherosclerosis, thrombosis and hypertension, we evaluated whether low concentrations of Mg could directly affect endothelial behavior. We found that low Mg concentrations reversibly inhibit endothelial proliferation, and this event correlates with a marked down-regulation of the levels of CDC25B. The inhibition of endothelial proliferation is due to an up-regulation of interleukin-1 (IL-1), since an antisense oligonucleotide against IL-1 could prevent the growth inhibition observed in cells exposed to low concentrations of the cation. We also report the up-regulation of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM) and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 after Mg deficiency. VCAM is responsible, at least in part, of the increased adhesion of monocytoid U937 cells to the endothelial cells grown in low magnesium. In addition, endothelial migratory response is severely impaired. By cDNA array, we identified several transcripts modulated by exposure to low Mg, some of which—c-src, ezrin, CD9, cytohesin and zyxin—contribute to endothelial adhesion to substrates and migration.
In conclusion, our results demonstrate a direct role of low magnesium in promoting endothelial dysfunction by generating a pro-inflammatory, pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic environment that could play a role in the pathogenesis cardiovascular disease.


Although the date on this article is May 24, 2004, it sounds like it may be of interest to many of us here.

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Jan 05, 2015 2:36 pm

for potentially interesting context here are a couple of TiMS conversations in which this particular article has appeared:

http://www.thisisms.com/forum/chronic-c ... ml#p201096 (2012)

http://www.thisisms.com/forum/undiagnos ... ml#p225287 (2014)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
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don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by THX1138 » Mon Feb 23, 2015 11:47 am

Magnesium: THE Ultimate Guide (Dr. Carolyn Dean)

http://www.fireitupwithcj.com/the-ultim ... magnesium/

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Re: all things magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Sep 30, 2016 11:30 am

Magnesium deficit - overlooked cause of low vitamin D status?
http://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/ar ... 015-11-229
"Like vitamin D deficit, magnesium deficit is considered to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Several steps in the vitamin D metabolism, such as vitamin D binding to its transport protein and the conversion of vitamin D into the hormonal form 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by hepatic and renal hydroxylation, depend on magnesium as a cofactor. A new analysis of two National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys data sets, published in BMC Medicine, investigated potential interactions between magnesium intake, circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, which is the generally accepted indicator of vitamin D status, and mortality. Data indicate a reduced risk of insufficient/deficient vitamin D status at high magnesium intake and an inverse association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and mortality, particularly cardiovascular mortality, among those with magnesium intake above the median. The study provides important findings concerning potential metabolic interactions between magnesium and vitamin D and its clinical relevance. However, results should be considered preliminary since biochemical data on individual magnesium status were lacking, confounding cannot be excluded and questions on the dose?response relationship still remain to be answered."
take control of your own health
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ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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study: high dietary protein/Ca/vitD3/alcohol=higher Mg needs

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Oct 10, 2016 7:29 am

excerpt from an oldie but a goodie. this dynamic has not improved over the last FIFTY YEARS. rather, the opposite.

Seelig, M. S. (1964). The requirement of magnesium by the normal adult Summary and analysis of published data. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 14(6), 342-390.
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/14/6/342.short

"The Occidental diet, however, provides an average of 250 to 300 mg. of magnesium daily, or less than 5 mg. per kg. per day for most adults. Because the Western diet is often also rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D, and alcohol ingestion is common, it is suggested that the optimal daily intake of magnesium should be 7 to 10 mg. per kg. per day.
The existence of subacute or chronic magnesium deficiency is difficult to diagnose. Because the tissues damaged by magnesium depletion are those of the cardiovascular, renal and the neuromuscular systems, early damage is not readily detectable. It is postulated that long-term suboptimal intakes of magnesium may participate in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases of these systems"
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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study: PPI meds deplete serum magnesium

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:03 am

docs have you on PPIs? we've posted plenty about this here at TiMS but just to refresh here's a new study underscoring the need to monitor your mag status, esp while on meds which deplete nutrients that are particularly problematic for ms patients!

PTU-112 Proton Pump Inhibitors – A Risk for Micronutrient Deficiency. But Are We Looking Out for This? (2016)
http://gut.bmj.com/content/65/Suppl_1/A111.1.abstract
"Of 41 patients identified, 38 (92.7%) had not had serum magnesium checked in the last 12 months including 15 (36.59%) who had never had it checked. 32 (78.1%) had not had serum ferritin or B12 checked in the past 12 months. Including 9 (21.95%) whom had never had it checked. The median (!) magnesium level was low (0.77, range 0.76–0.89). The median ferritin was normal (106, range 13–196). There was one incidence of B12 deficiency (2.44% all patients, 31.3% of all those tested). Median serum B12 was normal (351, range 10.6–645)."
quite the b12 number, don't think i'd be blaming the ppis alone for that one. worst result i ever had as a long term vegan was essentially undetectable (assay was sensitive down to 75 and the lab results said verbatim 'less than 75').

<rant>serum magnesium should be part of regular bloodwork for everyone, not just ms patients. and since we can consistently identify statistically significant differences between control and patient means in the literature, that means serum mag is not a poor indicator of status. it means having a result inside the normal range does not mean no action is required. the 'normal' range itself is linguistically deceptive. patients and their health care professionals need to be very clear about the fact that normal includes sick AND optimal/healthy. it means that the max and min on the status quo 'normal' ranges used at labs and misinterpreted by docs if ordered at all are at best misleading and at worst irresponsible / negligent. for that matter, why would a doc bother ordering a test that ALWAYS comes back normal no matter how many magnesium deficiency symptoms their patient may have? it's nonsense. ranges need to be updated so that the problems which are common sense over in the public health arena, don't continue to slide under the radar in the clinical setting.</rant>
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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study: serum mag 'significantly lower normal' in MS patients

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Dec 23, 2016 5:16 pm

does cover a lot of ground, but key findings more relevant to mg than any other specifically :)

Comparison of serum Concentration of Se, Pb, Mg, Cu, Zn, between MS patients and healthy controls
http://www.ephysician.ir/2016/2759.pdf
"Blood level of Mg was significantly lower in MS patients. But it should be noted that even with the low level of serum magnesium in MS patients, this value is still in the normal range." um yeah we know lol

arg i HATE when there's just p values in results but whatever :P
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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