a healthy gut

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jimmylegs
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Re: a healthy gut

Post by jimmylegs » Tue Jul 03, 2018 8:32 am

Interrelation of Diet, Gut Microbiome, and Autoantibody Production (2018)
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 00439/full

B cells possess a predominant role in adaptive immune responses via antibody-dependent and -independent functions. The microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract is currently being intensively investigated due to its profound impact on various immune responses, including B cell maturation, activation, and IgA antibody responses. Recent findings have demonstrated the interplay between dietary components, gut microbiome, and autoantibody production. “Western” dietary patterns, such as high fat and high salt diets, can induce alterations in the gut microbiome that in turn affects IgA responses and the production of autoantibodies. This could contribute to multiple pathologies including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we summarize current knowledge on the influence of various dietary components on B cell function and (auto)antibody production in relation to the gut microbiota, with a particular focus on the gut–brain axis in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

on the right track :)
healthy lifestyle > optimal macro and micro nutrient status > healthy microbiome > healthy immune system
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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2017 review: Feeding the microbiota-gut-brain axis

Post by jimmylegs » Thu Sep 27, 2018 5:04 am

Feeding the microbiota-gut-brain axis: diet, microbiome, and neuropsychiatry (2017)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 441630264X

The microbial population residing within the human gut represents one of the most densely populated microbial niche in the human body with growing evidence showing it playing a key role in the regulation of behavior and brain function. The bidirectional communication between the gut microbiota and the brain, the microbiota-gut-brain axis, occurs through various pathways including the vagus nerve, the immune system, neuroendocrine pathways, and bacteria-derived metabolites. This axis has been shown to influence neurotransmission and the behavior that are often associated with neuropsychiatric conditions. Therefore, research targeting the modulation of this gut microbiota as a novel therapy for the treatment of various neuropsychiatric conditions is gaining interest. Numerous factors have been highlighted to influence gut microbiota composition, including genetics, health status, mode of birth, and environment. However, it is diet composition and nutritional status that has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most critical modifiable factors regulating the gut microbiota at different time points across the lifespan and under various health conditions. Thus the microbiota is poised to play a key role in nutritional interventions for maintaining brain health.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

User avatar
jimmylegs
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Posts: 11994
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: a healthy gut

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:41 am

The gut microbiota and cardiovascular health benefits: A focus on wholegrain oats (2018)
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... /nbu.12354

Abstract
'Existing scientific data suggest that a high intake of wholegrain foods contributes to improved gut health and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Wholegrain oats are rich in dietary fibre and an important source of many bioactive components, including minerals, vitamins and phenolic compounds. The oat β‐glucans have been reported to lower low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol through their ability to increase the viscosity of intestinal chime, change the gut microbiota composition and increase the production of short‐chain fatty acids, which may contribute to the inhibition of hepatic cholesterol synthesis. Oats are also a rich source of phenolic acids, which are predominantly bound to cell wall polysaccharides through ester bonds. This bound state within oats means that phenolic acid bioavailability will largely be determined by interactions with the colonic microbiota in the large intestine. However, results from in vitro, animal and human studies have been inconsistent in relation to the impact of oats on the gut microbiota, possibly due to differences in experimental techniques and because compounds in oats, other than β‐glucans, have not been considered. This review focuses on the interaction of oat β‐glucans and phenolic acids with gut microbiota, and the subsequent link to cardiovascular health."

not sure what high is supposed to mean. my personalized food guide says 6 half cup servings per day. that's the canadian guide though, which pushes grains a bit more than the US version. (they seem to emphasize 'whole' a bit better mind you)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
Posts: 11994
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: a healthy gut

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Dec 19, 2018 10:32 am

i post this info with the caveat that you can readily implement vegetarian diet poorly and end up with an msdx, as has been my own experience not to mention others eg terry wahls.

'more veg good' depends on your starting point and IS NOT EQUAL to 'all veg better'.

Dietary non-fermentable fiber prevents autoimmune neurological disease by changing gut metabolic and immune status (2018)
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-28839-3

In summary, this study provides important insights into the role of diet in a spontaneous EAE model that is relevant for human MS. Epidemiological studies have shown that countries with a high intake of saturated fat have higher risk to develop MS than in countries with a high intake of polyunsaturated fat26. In addition, diets rich in fiber and omega 3 fatty acids have been encouraged for MS. However, these studies are merely anecdotal, and our study clearly warrants more systematic studies in humans. Interestingly, although case-control studies have found MS risk to be associated with animal fat or animal product consumption, or a protective effect of vegetable fats, Omega-3 and 6 fatty acids showed limited effects in controlled trials27,43. Our finding that dietary cellulose, which is high in vegetables, is likely protective through a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid fatty acid (cis-11 eicosenoic acid) common in plant oil and nuts suggests a potential reason for the beneficial effects of vegetable fat. The fact that vegetarian diet can be easily consumed in daily life, makes it a useful supplementation to the currently available medications. In addition, cis-11 eicosenoic acid could be tested as a supplement or treatment in human MS. Clearly, our findings warrant more nutritional studies in human MS, a field that is severely understudied with merely anecdotal evidence despite the substantial interest among MS patients to adjust their diet to improve health prospects.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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