CCSVI and CCVBP

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.
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Robnl
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by Robnl » Wed Mar 30, 2016 10:35 pm

NZer1 wrote:Hi,
Dr F are you able to ask Dr Rosa or Dr Damadian for me?

Regards,
Nigel
Hi Nigel,

Check. http://rosaclinic.com/scott-rosa/

Regards,

Robert

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NZer1
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by NZer1 » Wed Mar 30, 2016 11:01 pm

Thanks Robert ;)

Lots to read if Dr F is unable to ask direct questions from people who know the answers.

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Robnl
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by Robnl » Wed Mar 30, 2016 11:52 pm

Yeah, i usually mail them...dr rosa is a nice man

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uprightdoc
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by uprightdoc » Thu Mar 31, 2016 4:14 am

Thanks for refreshing my memory. I recalled most of your history but wanted to make sure. You have a mixed bag of findings.

The lesions in the brain and cord are most likely from Rugby trauma. Robert has many lesions in the brain and they are most likely the result of repeated head trauma and traumatic brain injuries form "heading" the ball in soccer. He also has compression deformity (Modic changes) in his entire cervical spine with significant stenosis compressing the epidural space and veins as well as the thecal sac and cord in the lower cervical spine. The compression deformities are most likely due to heading the ball as well. Compression of the epidural vertebral veins and thecal sac in the cervial cord can affect blood and CSF flow to the cord and brain. In addition to the scrum collapse injury you probably had other head and neck injuries as well from tackles and other contact. The scrum collapse cervical hyperflexion injury, however, is similar to spearing injuries and neurapraxia formerly seen in football from neck hyperflexion injuries. Spearing injuries cause temporary loss of blood flow (ischemia) to the cord similar to a mini stroke.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19691361

Pre-existing stenosis and spondylosis predispose people, such as seniors, to neurapraxia type injuries in whiplash. I suspect that racial and gender design differences of the optic and spinal canals play a role in optic neuritis and transverse myelitis seen in neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease) and Asian optic spinal MS.

It would be better if you ask Dr. Damadian about how he determined his normals. I would imagine that a "normal," not a "typical" spine would have no "ab-normalities" such as anomalous vertebrae, degenerated discs, abnormal curves, torn dura, muscles and connective tissues etc. Regardless of how he determined his normals, however, it will not influence your caregiver one iota in trying to connect your condition to MS and determing the next direction of your treatment approach. Considering your history, its hard to imagine that you don't have chronic injuries of the spine that affect your musculoskeletal and nervous system that require regular care by a competent professional.

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uprightdoc
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by uprightdoc » Thu Mar 31, 2016 4:19 am

Thanks for refreshing my memory. I recalled most of your history but wanted to make sure. You have a mixed bag of findings.

The lesions in the brain and cord are most likely from Rugby trauma. Robert has many lesions in the brain and they are most likely the result of repeated head trauma and traumatic brain injuries form "heading" the ball in soccer. He also has compression deformity (Modic changes) in his entire cervical spine with significant stenosis compressing the epidural space and veins as well as the thecal sac and cord in the lower cervical spine. The compression deformities are most likely due to heading the ball as well. Compression of the epidural vertebral veins and thecal sac in the cervial cord can affect blood and CSF flow to the cord and brain. In addition to the scrum collapse injury you probably had other head and neck injuries as well from tackles and other contact. The scrum collapse cervical hyperflexion injury, however, is similar to spearing injuries and neurapraxia formerly seen in football from neck hyperflexion injuries. Spearing injuries cause temporary loss of blood flow (ischemia) to the cord similar to a mini stroke.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19691361

Pre-existing stenosis and spondylosis predispose people, such as seniors, to neurapraxia type injuries in whiplash. I suspect that racial and gender design differences of the optic and spinal canals play a role in optic neuritis and transverse myelitis seen in neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease) and Asian optic spinal MS.

It would be better if you ask Dr. Damadian about how he determined his normals. I would imagine that a "normal," not a "typical" spine would have no "ab-normalities" such as anomalous vertebrae, degenerated discs, abnormal curves, torn dura, muscles and connective tissues etc. Regardless of how he determined his normals, however, it will not influence your caregiver one iota in trying to connect your condition to MS and determing the next direction of your treatment approach. Considering your history, its hard to imagine that you don't have chronic injuries of the spine that affect your musculoskeletal and nervous system that require regular care by a competent professional.

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NZer1
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by NZer1 » Thu Mar 31, 2016 4:25 am

Thank Dr F

I am now faced with the challenge of making contact with Dr Damadian, any clues how I can do that eg email or other ways to make contact?

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uprightdoc
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by uprightdoc » Thu Mar 31, 2016 5:18 am

Go to the FONAR website and contact his office.

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Robnl
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by Robnl » Thu Mar 31, 2016 8:49 am

NZer1 wrote:Thank Dr F

I am now faced with the challenge of making contact with Dr Damadian, any clues how I can do that eg email or other ways to make contact?
Hi nigel,

Did you try
E-mail: rvdamadian@fonar.com

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NZer1
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by NZer1 » Thu Mar 31, 2016 9:35 am

Thank you team, you have saving me lots of time, eg how the f... do I find him!

Wonderful :)

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Robnl
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sinusses and veins

Post by Robnl » Thu Mar 31, 2016 10:58 pm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18004050
Abstract

The veins of the brain have no muscular tissue in their thin walls and possess no valves. They emerge from the brain and lie in the subarachnoid space. They pierce the arachnoid mater and the meningeal layer of the dura and drain into the cranial venous sinuses. The cerebral venous system can be divided into a superficial and a deep system. The superficial system comprises sagittal sinuses and cortical veins, which drain superficial surfaces of both cerebral hemispheres. The deep system consists of the lateral sinus, straight sinus and sigmoid sinus along with draining deeper cortical veins. Both of these systems mostly drain into internal jugular veins. Generally, venous blood drains into the nearest venous sinus or, in the case of blood draining from the deepest structures, into deep veins. The superficial cerebral veins are interlinked with anastomotic veins of Trolard and Labbé. Thus, the superolateral surface of the hemisphere drains into the superior sagittal sinus while the posteroinferior aspect drains into the transverse sinus. The veins of the posterior fossa are variable in course, and angiographic diagnosis of their occlusion is difficult. The entire deep venous system is drained by internal cerebral and basal veins, which join to form the great vein of Galen that drains into the straight sinus. Though variation in the superficial cerebral venous system is a rule, anatomic configuration of the deep venous system can be used as anatomic landmarks. Since thrombosis or surgical sacrifice of the cerebral veins may lead to venous infarction with serious complications, angiographic and surgical anatomy of the venous system should be seriously investigated for each individual patient.

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NZer1
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by NZer1 » Fri Apr 01, 2016 9:39 pm

Answers for the Damadian paper

EDITED, this video is far easier to understand the specifics that Dr Rosa has found and the treatment outcomes from his experiences during the ongoing learning processes.



Another similar video from CCSVI Alliance/Sharon Richardson :)



When I watched this presentation many answers to my questions appeared, wish I had gone a couple of years ago when Dr F organised for me to be part of the study, and life goes on ...................... ;)

Nigel :) :)

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NZer1
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by NZer1 » Sun Apr 03, 2016 12:15 am

Hi all,
Dr F were you at the conference "Scott Rosa, DC, BCAO, speaking at FONAR's Cranio-Cervical Syndrome Symposium held on April 6, 2013, New York, NY"?



Seems to be a pivotal moment in the knowledge curve explosion!

I hope that all of us who frequent this site have a listen and if possible an evaluation by Dr Rosa. ;)

Regards All,
Nigel :)

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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by uprightdoc » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:09 am

Hello Nigel,

No, I wasn't at the meeting.

What was pivotal is the recognition of the importance of upright MRI in diagnosis and the role of the spine in faulty craniospinal hydrodynamics.

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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by uprightdoc » Mon Apr 04, 2016 7:37 am

Hello Robert,

What is the distance form Brussels to your chiropractor, George's office?

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Robnl
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Re: CCSVI and CCVBP

Post by Robnl » Mon Apr 04, 2016 1:11 pm

uprightdoc wrote:Hello Robert,

What is the distance form Brussels to your chiropractor, George's office?
Hi doc,

Its about 220 km, 145 miles.

Rgds

Robert

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