What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

This is the place to ask questions if you have symptoms that suggest MS, but aren't yet diagnosed.
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auntie
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What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by auntie » Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:32 pm

Hi,

New here. I'm glad to have found this supportive community. My question is: what is the point of seeking a diagnosis? If I have MS, can medications prevent or slow nerve and brain damage? Or, as I have read in some posts, more an issue of lessening the symptoms? I am very reluctant to approach a doctor about my symptoms. I have insurance, but it is Affordable Care Act insurance; I don't want a preexisting condition. I don't want my boss to find out. I can't afford an MRI. Also, I'm fairly sure my "illness" is psychosomatic. How would seeking or (if it's not actually psychosomatic) receiving a diagnosis help me?

My symptoms are pretty much all on the left side of my body (except vision which is general):

* Face has a burning heat that moves from the mastoid process through the zygomatic area if that makes sense, becoming numb and cold as it moves. This has lasted at least 3 or 4 years and happens several times a month, sometimes multiple times in a day in rapid succession. I thought my face was getting hot on the left side but when I look in the mirror it looks the same as ever.

* Vision suffers from white flashes in the periphery of vision (a few times a month), and twice I have experienced a kind of juddering, skipping problem of vision. Occasionally it's hard to focus.

* Leg had a weird burning numbness in the thigh, which lasted off and on for a few weeks and has subsided. Now it's like a dull numb heaviness in that area. This came up suddenly two months or so ago--I thought I had somehow heated up my keys and then put them in my pocket! But the real burning only lasted a few weeks, intermittently, and has been replaced with the numb heaviness and a weird itchy sensation.

*Seriously annoying tic in my left eye. It just goes crazy, which is frustrating because I can't control it and I'm a teacher...I don't want my students to see this, but I'm sure they've noticed. Happens weekly.

*Arm and hand have "pins and needles" and shots of pain but I'm kind of thinking that part is just my imagination.

*Memory is kind of shot in terms of remembering words, terms, and names as quickly as I used to.

*Dizziness when walking from time to time.

*No L'Hermitte's Sign or random pain other than occasional stabs in the temple (which I think is normal, and this isn't confined to my left side like the other stuff)

I am 40, a woman, and suffered brain trauma twice at age 12 as the result of falls. I also had a tiny bit of nerve damage a few years ago after taking an antibiotic to which I turned out to be allergic (cipro). I have always been prone to depression and anxiety, although I have obtained a high level of education and have until recently been doing well in my field. I just don't see how a diagnosis could help me if the medicine only addresses the symptoms and doesn't slow the progression or help with the nerve damage, and then I'm saddled with a preexisting condition. So far, I have just talked to my husband about it, and got a B12 test which was normal at 650. I don't want to alienate a doctor with what is most likely a psychosomatic illness, or at least one that is very difficult to pinpoint.

Any perspectives would be most welcome--thank you!!

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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by NHE » Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:18 am

auntie wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 6:32 pm
New here. I'm glad to have found this supportive community. My question is: what is the point of seeking a diagnosis? If I have MS, can medications prevent or slow nerve and brain damage? Or, as I have read in some posts, more an issue of lessening the symptoms? I am very reluctant to approach a doctor about my symptoms. I have insurance, but it is Affordable Care Act insurance; I don't want a preexisting condition. I don't want my boss to find out. I can't afford an MRI. Also, I'm fairly sure my "illness" is psychosomatic. How would seeking or (if it's not actually psychosomatic) receiving a diagnosis help me?
It's best not to self diagnose. What if your symptoms are not due to MS , but something else that could be treated? When you do see a doctor, print out your list of symptoms and give it to them so that they have a clear record of what you're experiencing. Some doctors lose information or get things wrong when they write up their notes.

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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by ElliotB » Mon Mar 04, 2019 7:56 am

"How would seeking or (if it's not actually psychosomatic) receiving a diagnosis help me?"

It would really only help you if you wanted medical treatment, ie the correct choice of a drug therapy which would be predicated on a diagnosis. Otherwise self treatment is pretty much the same regardless of what you have, proper/improved diet, lots of exercise, nutritional supplements to help with any deficiencies your blood work may reveal or that are apparent in your diet and stress reduction (very, very important).

I agree with NHE, It's best not to self diagnose! Don't be afraid to use your medical insurance. A prompt and accurate diagnosis could be very helpful.

Good luck, hope you feel better soon.

auntie
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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by auntie » Wed Mar 06, 2019 7:40 am

Thanks for your replies! I have not decided what to do but it is good to be in touch with this group.
Has anyone else been confused about whether the "illness" is psychosomatic? I feel like it must be, in my case...I have always been a nervous person. and I don't want to waste time and money only to look like a fool!

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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by jimmylegs » Wed Mar 06, 2019 9:58 am

hi there. interested in my input? let me know :)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

auntie
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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by auntie » Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:11 am

jimmylegs wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2019 9:58 am
hi there. interested in my input? let me know :)

Not sure what you mean? I am interested in any input. Especially regarding psychosomatic illness and how to differentiate it from an actual physical condition. I didn't see a comment from you in the previous thread, but any input you have would be welcome. Based on your signature, I will guess that it will have to do with diet, exercise, and self-care.

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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by ElliotB » Thu Mar 07, 2019 3:04 pm

Why take a chance and guess? Could be psychosomatic, or could be something 'real'. For your long term health, it may be in your best interest to determine what the true cause is.

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Re: What is the point of seeking a diagnosis

Post by vesta » Sat Mar 09, 2019 2:26 am

"I am 40, a woman, and suffered brain trauma twice at age 12 as the result of falls. I also had a tiny bit of nerve damage a few years ago after taking an antibiotic to which I turned out to be allergic (cipro). I have always been prone to depression and anxiety, although I have obtained a high level of education and have until recently been doing well in my field. I just don't see how a diagnosis could help me if the medicine only addresses the symptoms and doesn't slow the progression or help with the nerve damage, and then I'm saddled with a preexisting condition. So far, I have just talked to my husband about it, and got a B12 test which was normal at 650. I don't want to alienate a doctor with what is most likely a psychosomatic illness, or at least one that is very difficult to pinpoint. "

I would start with the brain trauma age 12. According to Dr Raymond Damadian it can take on average 11 years for an accident which has impacted the spine to surface as so called MS symptoms. However, the treatment would be chiropractic/osteopathic, not Neurologist. Your fears of an MS diagnosis are entirely justified since if the origin of your problems is skeletal damage, Neurologists are unlikely to recognize it or be able to treat it. (An Osteopath MD may be the best solution in the USA) See CCSVI Alliance Dr Scott Rosa for starters. Or consider point one of my Seven Steps to MS Health below.

Wishing you the best,

Vesta

"MY SEVEN STEPS TO MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS HEALTH

1. ENHANCE BLOOD/CEREBRO-SPINAL FLUID CIRCULATION

My analyses and emphasis on the fluid circulation issue set me apart from other alternative healing sites. I insist it is of vital importance.

If had known that my MS is essentially a pathology characterised by obstructed central nervous system fluid flows – blood and cerebrospinal fluid – I wouldn’t need a cane to walk today. That one simple concept changed my life forever, but it came too late to save me from handicap. It came in time to slow progression.

My research has concluded there exist three fundamental fluid obstructions. 1) skeletal obstructions of fluid flows – bones, ligaments, muscles, arteries. 2) spasms in the veins’ middle smooth muscle layer which obstruct blood flow and 3) stenosed veins in need of being ballooned open to overcome interior obstructions, the CCSVI issue.

Before undergoing venoplasty for CCSVI by an Interventional Radiologist (issue 3), I think one should verify that there is no skeletal obstruction (issue 1). The best diagnostic tool for that is a cinematic upright FONAR MRI. Chiropractors are probably the best therapists to determine and treat skeletal obstructions and may be able to suggest tools less expensive than the FONAR MRI. Issue number 2 may be the easiest to treat through relaxation techniques (yoga) or simple blood/cerebrospinal fluid circulation therapies such as massage, acupuncture, neuro-muscular electrical stimulation, osteopathy, or swimming. The injection by an MD of a mixture of dexamethasone/lidocaine/thiamine used to treat trigeminal neuralgia may be considered.

2. DE-TOXIFY

After a lifetime of eating badly, ingesting antibiotics and other toxic chemicals, exposure to heavy metals and nuclear fallout, toxins build up in the body and need to be flushed out in order to maximize the benefit of ideal, personalized foods and supplements. Check out DETOXIFY on the Internet to find your preferred protocol. One example:
want2bike (From Thisisms.com)suggested
“Dr. Hyman explains his 10 day detox diet.

I had the advice/assistance of a kinesiologist/nutritionist and won’t myself suggest a detox protocol. Dr. Hyman maintains that a simple diet change over 10 days will do the trick (or at least be a beginning) which is something anyone can try. So why not? (It takes 5 days to withdraw from a food allergy).

See also my Detoxification and Supplements post.

3. OPTIMAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY NUTRITION.

See C-Reactive Protein – Key to MS Diet

Diet is critical to many diseases, particularly « auto-immune ». However, areas of vulnerability differ. For MSers it’s the vascular system linked to the central nervous system that matters. Diet impacts production of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) – which in turn impacts the endothelium of the vascular system. Secondly, proper diet acts to reduce cellular inflammation thereby preventing spasms in the veins’ smooth muscle layer. It follows that for MSers proper diet facilitates blood/cerebrospinal fluid circulation. For those without a serious veinous obstruction, diet/supplements alone may suffice to heal

4. SUPPLEMENTS

I have been taking a customized Standard Process Supplement Protocol (with additions) recommended by my Kinesiologist/Nutritionist since 1984 so I won’t suggest a general plan.
As to Diet, consider my post Paleo-Macro-biotic diet.

As a general protocol consult Matt Embry’s excellent
http://www.mshope.com. (food, supplements, exercise, CCSVI).


5. SUNLIGHT OR UV RAYS on the skin at least 15 minutes daily to release Nitric Oxide essential to vascular health and blood circulation.

6. Homeopathic remedy Oscillococcinum by Boiron to head off a virus. IT WORKS (unless perhaps one is taking a toxic drug. Anti-biotics annul it for me.) Cost – 1 euro the dose, 1 or 2 doses will stop a sore throat, 6 doses maximum treatment over 3 days ($8).

7. EXERCISE BUILD UP PROGRESSIVELY (Consulting a Physical Therapist may help.)
Be moderate in terms of your current condition. Don’t do so much that you throw yourself into an « attack ». (Early on I stressed myself with a « performance » mentality.) Now I walk a minimum number of steps per day and swim when I can.

Be creative. Tif of ThisisMS.com has recovered function with Neuromuscular electrical nerve stimulation in the Onyx Body S haping and Slim Spa which uses “Madame and Monsieur Electro-Slim Technology”. Hugo Macia (www.secretosdelaesclerosismultiple.blogspot.com.es.) is testing on himself a German made Neuromuscular “jacket” to regain function. See https://www.miha-bodytec.com/en/product/"

Previously published on my site MSCureEnigmas.net https://www.mscureenigmas.net/

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