new diagnostic protocol proposed

A forum to discuss research on the origins of MS and its development.
Post Reply
User avatar
frodo
Family Elder
Posts: 1249
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:00 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 1 time
Contact:

new diagnostic protocol proposed

Post by frodo » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:31 am

One of the worst problems of MS is the misdiagnosis. Given the strong side effects of some drugs neurologist wanto to be sure and delay the diagnosis until damage in the brain is big enough to be seen on a MRI.

Besides, MRI can only show lesions with a BBB breakdown. That's an advanced state of damage. Lesions develop first as a normal-appearing area, then inflammation, then demyelinationand then a BBB breakdown. Only then it can be seen on MRI. But sadly BBB breakdown is not MS specific and therefore only after two of these attacks a diagnosis is made.

To have an early diagnosis would be a great advance for new patients. The team behind this paper are working with PET, other kind of imaging system, and they are able to see damage earlier and more accurately.

The only problem with this system is that it is good enough to work automatically without a neurologist. Therefore maybe we will never see it working.

TSPO imaging using the novel PET ligand [18F]GE-180: quantification approaches in patients with multiple sclerosis

https://ejnmmires.springeropen.com/arti ... 017-0340-x

Abstract
Background


PET ligands targeting the translocator protein (TSPO) represent promising tools to visualise neuroinflammation. Here, we analysed parameters obtained in dynamic and static PET images using the novel TSPO ligand [18F]GE-180 in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and an approach for semi-quantitative assessment of this disease in clinical routine.

Seventeen dynamic [18F]GE-180 PET scans of RRMS patients were evaluated (90 min). A pseudo-reference region (PRR) was defined after identification of the least disease-affected brain area by voxel-based comparison with six healthy controls (HC) and upon exclusion of voxels suspected of being affected in static 60–90 min p.i. images. Standardised uptake value ratios (SUVR) obtained from static images normalised to PRR were correlated to the distribution volume ratios (DVR) derived from dynamic data with Logan reference tissue model.

Results

Group comparison with HC revealed white matter and thalamus as most affected regions. Fewest differences were found in grey matter, and normalisation to frontal cortex (FC) yielded the greatest reduction in variability of healthy grey and white matter. Hence, FC corrected for affected voxels was chosen as PRR, leading to time-activity curves of FC which were congruent to HC data (SUV60–90 0.37, U test P = 0.42). SUVR showed a very strong correlation with DVR (Pearson ρ > 0.9). Focal MS lesions exhibited a high SUVR (range, 1.3–3.2).

Conclusions

This comparison with parameters from dynamic data suggests that SUVR normalised to corrected frontal cortex as PRR is suitable for the quantification of [18F]GE-180 uptake in lesions and different brain regions of RRMS patients. This efficient diagnostic protocol based on static [18F]GE-180 PET scans acquired 60–90 min p.i. allows the semi-quantitative assessment of neuroinflammation in RRMS patients in clinical routine.

ElliotB
Family Elder
Posts: 1795
Joined: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:08 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 9 times

Re: new diagnostic protocol proposed

Post by ElliotB » Tue Sep 25, 2018 3:49 pm

A few days ago you posted info on a blood test for diagnosing MS. Not sure is this new diagnostic protocol is necessary if the accuracy of the blood test is truly as accurate as stated.

User avatar
frodo
Family Elder
Posts: 1249
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:00 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 1 time
Contact:

Re: new diagnostic protocol proposed

Post by frodo » Wed Sep 26, 2018 5:02 am

ElliotB wrote:A few days ago you posted info on a blood test for diagnosing MS. Not sure is this new diagnostic protocol is necessary if the accuracy of the blood test is truly as accurate as stated.
Agreed. But that test belongs to a private firm and probably is covered by patents. I don't expect it to become mainstream soon even if it worked.

And in any case, they say that this other test can also serve to monitor neuroinflammation in RRMS patients in clinical routine.

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post