Paleo Diet discussion

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet
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jimmylegs
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Re: Paleo Diet discussion

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:26 am

let's play spot the study design flaws:

A Paleolithic Diet-Based Intervention Decreases Multiple Sclerosis Fatigue via Lipid Profile Changes (P2.358) (2018)
http://n.neurology.org/content/90/15_Supplement/P2.358

Abstract
Objective: To investigate associations between lipid profiles and fatigue in a cohort of progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients on a modified Paleolithic diet-based multimodal intervention.

Background: Fatigue is a frequent and debilitating MS symptom that affects between 52%–93% of MS patients. Pharmacological options for treating MS-associated fatigue are limited. Dietary interventions have shown particular promise for treating MS-associated fatigue.

Design/Methods: This study included 18 progressive MS patients who participated in a prospective longitudinal study of fatigue following a modified Paleolithic diet-based multimodal intervention that included neuromuscular stimulation and stress reduction. Fatigue was measured on the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) at baseline and every 3 months for 12 months. A lipid profile consisting of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) was obtained on fasting blood samples at baseline and 12 months.

Results: The FSS score decreased from a mean of 5.51 ± 1.31 at baseline to 3.03 ± 1.6 at 12-months. The modified Paleolithic-diet based multimodal intervention was associated with increases in HDL-C (p = 0.049) and with decreases in BMI (p < 0.001), TG (p = 0.001), TG to HDL-C ratio (p = 0.002) and TC to HDL-C ratio (p = 0.018) over 12-months. Improvements in FSS were associated with greater HDL-C (p = 0.028) and lower TC (p = 0.005) at 12 months. TC (p = 0.039), HDL-C (p = 0.008) and TG to HDL-C ratio (p = 0.042) were associated with 3-month sustained improvement of > 2 FSS points.

Conclusions: Lipid profile variables are associated with the improvements in fatigue in progressive MS patients on a modified Paleolithic diet-based multimodal intervention.




aside - missing from disclosures: Dr Wahls arrived at her msdx as a vegetarian. for her, paleo represents a pendulum swing to the other extreme.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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Re: Paleo Diet discussion

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Aug 27, 2018 9:42 am

:roll: well randomized and controlled is better at least. as usual, specifics for either diet - including the degree to which each conforms to standard public health info - would be informative, but is missing.
(i also want to know whether serum zinc status modifies any perceived impacts of dairy and gluten intake, but so far to my knowledge no one has bothered to address that research gap).

Randomized control trial evaluation of a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a pilot study (2017)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6053098/

Abstract

Background/objective
A Paleolithic diet may improve fatigue and quality of life in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, but past research has evaluated the effects of this dietary intervention in combination with other treatments such as exercise. Thus, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate a modified Paleolithic dietary intervention (MPDI) in the treatment of fatigue and other symptoms in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS).
Methods
We measured the effects of a MPDI in 17 individuals with RRMS. Of 34 subjects randomly assigned to control (maintain usual diet) and intervention (MPDI) groups, nine subjects (one man) completed the control group and eight subjects (one man) completed the MPDI.
Results
Significant improvements were seen in Fatigue Severity Scale score and also in Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 and time to complete (dominant hand) 9-Hole Peg Test from baseline in MPDI subjects compared to controls. Increased vitamin K serum levels were also observed in MPDI subjects post-protocol compared to controls.
Conclusion
A Paleolithic diet may be useful in the treatment and management of MS, by reducing perceived fatigue, increasing mental and physical quality of life, increasing exercise capacity, and improving hand and leg function. By increasing vitamin K serum levels, the MPDI may also reduce inflammation.

surprise bob! this diet is better than your status quo cheetos regimen.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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