Diet & MS Research

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet
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jimmylegs
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2015 review: Nutrition Facts in MS

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Feb 27, 2015 12:06 pm

Riccio, P., & Rossano, R. (2015). Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis. ASN neuro, 7(1), 1759091414568185.
Chicago http://asn.sagepub.com/content/7/1/1759 ... 8185.short

The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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2014 study: Effect of food groups intake on serum elements

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:45 pm

Effect of changes in food groups intake on magnesium, zinc, copper, and selenium serum levels during 2 years of dietary intervention (2014)
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1 ... 4FtqPkrLq4

selected abstract excerpts:

Two hundred thirty-one participants, a subgroup of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Control Trial (DIRECT) study (age = 52 years; body mass index = 32.8 kg/m2; 85% males) randomized to low-fat, Mediterranean, or low-carbohydrate diets in a 2-year dietary intervention trial were followed for serum concentrations determined using inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. Changes in the intake of 11 food groups were evaluated by food frequency questionnaires.

At 24 months, serum elements were elevated mainly in the low-fat diet group, mostly by decreasing intake of snacks, sweets, and cakes: zinc (β = −0.570, p = 0.027), copper (β = −0.649, p = 0.012), and selenium (β = −0.943, p < 0.001). Also in this group, magnesium levels were elevated by increasing vegetable intake (β = 0.395, p = 0.041), copper by increasing fruit intake (β = 0.375, p = 0.025), and selenium by increasing consumption of bread, pasta, and cereals (β = 0.751, p = 0.011).
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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Study: Eval. Diet & Outcomes Progressive MS

Post by jimmylegs » Fri Sep 23, 2016 5:56 am

Evaluation of Dietary Nutrients in Relation to Clinical Outcomes in Chronic-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
http://advances.nutrition.org/content/7/1/15A.short
"Objective: The purpose of this analysis is to determine which components of a modified Paleolithic diet are most related to patient outcomes as evaluated by the Medical Symptom Questionnaire (MSQ) in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) to identify nutrients related to outcomes.

Methods: This is a secondary analysis of nutrition data from a multimodal intervention which significantly reduced fatigue and improved physical functioning in subjects with MS. Data was obtained from FFQ, MSQ, exercise, and stress reduction data at baseline (pre-intervention) and 12 mo. The impact of min/d of exercise and stress reduction; intake of fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, iodine, potassium, retinol, and carotene; and vitamins B-1, B-2, B-3, B-5, B-6, B-9, B-12, K, C, A, and D on MSQ change were considered using bivariate and multiple regression models analyses. Interactions were considered with baseline, age, y with MS, and body mass index (BMI). All statistical analyses used SAS9.3.

Results: Variables that reached statistical of p≤ 0.1 were considered in the model. The final model included MSQ baseline, age*fiber, and fiber*baseline, and explained ∼83% in the variance of MSQ change. MSQ change is related to fiber, moderated by age and baseline. Plotting the data ( Figure 1) revealed in subjects aged <50 y that high fiber intake is strongly associated with improvement in MSQ. However, in subjects aged >60 y, high fiber did not prevent a decline in MSQ. Subjects with the poorest MSQ at baseline also benefited the most from higher fiber.

Conclusions: Our results indicate that improvement in MSQ is related to increased fiber intake, moderated by age and baseline MSQ. Recent discoveries in the microbiome on progression of MS may explain our results. Increased fiber intake alters the microbiome and may reduce inflammation or signal to the brain via pathways to improve MS symptoms."
hopefully one day someone finds the money/interest to also look at vit E and mag, zinc, copper, and iron, to also inquire re food prep and combos, to take serum values AND see how people are doing.

at least for now we can infer that magnesium status would better for those who saw benefit from high fibre
Effects of Dietary Fibers on Magnesium Absorption in Animals and Humans
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/133/1/1.full

we also know that improved mag means improved vit D3 status, independent of 'intake'. it would be nice to take another run at those FFQ results, look at a few other factors.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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study: DNA damage, micronutrient deficiencies and cancer

Post by jimmylegs » Sat Nov 05, 2016 7:31 pm

OT but quite interesting:
DNA damage from micronutrient deficiencies is likely to be a major cause of cancer
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 0701000707
A deficiency of any of the micronutrients: folic acid, Vitamin B12, Vitamin B6, niacin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, iron, or zinc, mimics radiation in damaging DNA by causing single- and double-strand breaks, oxidative lesions, or both. For example, the percentage of the US population that has a low intake (<50% of the RDA) for each of these eight micronutrients ranges from 2 to >20%. A level of folate deficiency causing chromosome breaks was present in approximately 10% of the US population, and in a much higher percentage of the poor. Folate deficiency causes extensive incorporation of uracil into human DNA (4 million/cell), leading to chromosomal breaks. This mechanism is the likely cause of the increased colon cancer risk associated with low folate intake. Some evidence, and mechanistic considerations, suggest that Vitamin B12 (14% US elderly) and B6 (10% of US) deficiencies also cause high uracil and chromosome breaks. Micronutrient deficiency may explain, in good part, why the quarter of the population that eats the fewest fruits and vegetables (five portions a day is advised) has about double the cancer rate for most types of cancer when compared to the quarter with the highest intake. For example, 80% of American children and adolescents and 68% of adults do not eat five portions a day. Common micronutrient deficiencies are likely to damage DNA by the same mechanism as radiation and many chemicals, appear to be orders of magnitude more important, and should be compared for perspective. Remedying micronutrient deficiencies should lead to a major improvement in health and an increase in longevity at low cost.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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(newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Nov 21, 2016 2:32 pm

Individual and Co-occurring SNAP Risk Factors: Investigation of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol Consumption, and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis (2016 in press)
http://www.ijmsc.org/doi/abs/10.7224/1537-2073.2016-040
"Poor diet was the most common risk factor, with 85.5% of the sample not meeting dietary guidelines. Of participants with two or more risk factors, 90.3% were not meeting dietary and physical activity guidelines. There were differential rates of meeting physical activity guidelines between men and women (χ2 = 7.5, P = .01) such that 73% of women were not meeting physical activity guidelines compared with 38% of men. There were further differential rates of the most commonly co-occurring risk factors, insufficient physical activity and poor nutrition by sex (χ2 = 4.2, P = .05), such that 65% of women reported the co-occurrence of insufficient physical activity and poor diet compared with 38% of men."
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by MS_HOPE » Sun Nov 27, 2016 4:51 am

Thanks for posting! Clearly diet and lifestyle need to be addressed in people with MS, and these are ignored or understated by most neurologists, to whom many patients look for advice in dealing with their MS. Would be more helpful for the researchers to have included a healthy control group. Unfortunately, the majority of people in the US are malnourished!

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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by jimmylegs » Sun Nov 27, 2016 6:41 am

np :) consumption info is definitely out there separately for general population if not for optimally healthy controls per se. i googled it recently for US and canada at least, quick and easy find. the short list of nutrients not consumed to guidelines is similar for both countries. no surprises in there, except in canada i noted the data table was more informative than the text summary.
it would certainly interest me to see the spectrum of health and disease, serum levels, and diet/lifestyle (antinutient) patterns among individuals who do meet current dietary guidelines.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

ElliotB
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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by ElliotB » Sun Nov 27, 2016 12:36 pm

"Unfortunately, the majority of people in the US are malnourished!"

This is very true! Most foods available to us have 'empty' calories. MSers and others with or susceptible to major illnesses likely need to be especially careful. as to the foods they consume IMHO.

And so called nutritional 'experts' can't even agree on what foods are really beneficial to us.

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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by jimmylegs » Sun Nov 27, 2016 1:13 pm

i don't think blanket food recommendations for ms patients are wise given that individuals may have widely different histories at diagnosis.

eg i'm super active and i got ms! (do you use up more macro and MICROnutrients than you put in?, let's check out your situation against those RDIs!) or

...i'm a junkivore (TM lol) and i got ms! (probably need to cut the fat content and empty calories among other things, yes? let's compare your situation to those RDIs!) or

...i'm vegetarian/vegan and i got ms! (time to have a look at whether you're getting enough x y and z, let's check those RDIs!) or

..i'm diabetic and i got ms! (hmm look at that list of common suspect nutrients, how does that stack up against your day to day, now let's check the RDIs!)

wait i'm sensing a pattern... but each person's route to meeting RDIs can't be expected to be identical.

i'm not up to date on the challenges or implications, i think it's probably a bit of an unpleasant regulatory can of worms, but it does get on my nerves that there's no access to nutrient content of unprocessed whole food products when shopping. i mean if it's readily available online, why can't vendors post in the store? i mean i know of the odd specialty store that does, but it's far from status quo.
this one site (Canadian Medical Protective Association) looked like it might contain some promising info but it doesn't seem to be resolving atm so in the meantime, short link to the text only / cache version: http://bit.ly/2fG4vib
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Nov 28, 2016 8:40 am

meanwhile this:
The Canada Food Guide is killing you: ‘The obesity epidemic… really began with our dietary guidelines’
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canad ... guidelines
"Canadians are a pretty obedient bunch when it comes to eating what the government says we should be eating." .... hmm really?

found one related academic publication
http://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h4962.full.pdf+html
and corrections:
http://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h5686

vs this:
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/surveill/n ... eng.php#a1
"5 in 10 women and 7 in 10 men have energy intakes that exceed their energy needs.
25% of males and 23% of females, 19 years and older, have fat intakes above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range.
32% of males and 21% of females, 19 years and older, have carbohydrate intakes below the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range."
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

ElliotB
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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by ElliotB » Mon Nov 28, 2016 10:02 am

25% of males and 23% of females, 19 years and older, have fat intakes above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range.
32% of males and 21% of females, 19 years and older, have carbohydrate intakes below the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range.



I am on an extremely high fat diet with very, very minimal carbs and am doing quite well. As I stated previously, there is no agreement on what is truly healthy among the so called 'experts'.

So when there are diets, especially MS diets, that oppose each other in almost every way that seem to work for many regardless of what they follow, it can make critical dieting decisions difficult.

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jimmylegs
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Re: (newsflash!) study: 85% of MS patients malnourished

Post by jimmylegs » Mon Nov 28, 2016 11:47 am

we can't justifiably stack single cases up against large meta analyses however. 'i' did very well as a vegan for over 15 yrs.. until i didn't any more :S

a high fat low carb diet (high protein too) would have made (and did make) loads of sense for me once dxd. doesn't mean it would help everyone. and it doesn't mean it would be beneficial forever.

that was the mistake i made in the first place as an early vegan. i had some measurable benefits show up and took things to extremes without paying enough attention to the risks. i *still* note absolute BS on vegan nutrition web sites. ie 'nerve damage' as a risk of b12 deficiency, which is apparently meant to describe 'disintegration of your spinal cord ie that thing allowing your brain to communicate with your body and control your ability to feel things and move your various body parts, nbd)

having learned my lesson about taking one dietary recommendation too far and for too long, going forward it will always be about balance.

it's about common sense really (or should be), and as above, seeing how individuals align (or don't) with general health recommendations, with extra emphasis (ie exceed joe average RDIs for therapeutic purposes) where nutrients known to be problematic for ms patients are concerned.

from where i sit, it just makes no sense to expect experts to agree on one dietary route for all the different kinds of people who arrive at an msdx under the current diagnostic regime.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

orphansparrow
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Re: study: DNA damage, micronutrient deficiencies and cancer

Post by orphansparrow » Mon Dec 12, 2016 8:08 pm

Hey jimmylegs :)

I just wanted to say thank you for everything you contribute to this site. I don't usually comment, but I always read, and am very grateful for you.

:)

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jimmylegs
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Re: study: DNA damage, micronutrient deficiencies and cancer

Post by jimmylegs » Tue Dec 13, 2016 11:22 am

sentiment much appreciated, OS :D
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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jimmylegs
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report: <1% of canadians meeting diet guidelines

Post by jimmylegs » Tue Dec 13, 2016 12:13 pm

Most Waterloo Region residents don't meet food guidelines: report (2014)
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener ... -1.2735121
"Researchers found that only 3 out of every 1000 people in the region met the healthy eating guidelines set out by Health Canada.
"It's a fairly shocking number, especially because 75 per cent of Canadians think they eat a good or excellent-quality diet," [JL LOLOLOL ya right ppl] "But actually the Canadian average is about 0.5 per cent, so five out of every thousand, so we're pretty close to the national average"
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!

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