Split-Belt Training

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Petr75
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Split-Belt Training

Post by Petr75 »

2021 Dec 31
Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Würzburg, Germany
Split-Belt Training but Not Cerebellar Anodal tDCS Improves Stability Control and Reduces Risk of Fall in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35053807/

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of multiple sessions of training on a split-belt treadmill (SBT) combined with cerebellar anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on gait and balance in People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS). Twenty-two PwMS received six sessions of anodal (PwMSreal, n = 12) or sham (PwMSsham, n = 10) tDCS to the cerebellum prior to performing the locomotor adaptation task on the SBT. To evaluate the effect of the intervention, functional gait assessment (FGA) scores and distance walked in 2 min (2MWT) were measured at the baseline (T0), day 6 (T5), and at the 4-week follow up (T6). Locomotor performance and changes of motor outcomes were similar in PwMSreal and PwMSsham independently from tDCS mode applied to the cerebellum (anodal vs. sham, on FGA, p = 0.23; and 2MWT, p = 0.49). When the data were pooled across the groups to investigate the effects of multiple sessions of SBT training alone, significant improvement of gait and balance was found on T5 and T6, respectively, relative to baseline (FGA, p < 0.001 for both time points). The FGA change at T6 was significantly higher than at T5 (p = 0.01) underlining a long-lasting improvement. An improvement of the distance walked during the 2MWT was also observed on T5 and T6 relative to T0 (p = 0.002). Multiple sessions of SBT training resulted in a lasting improvement of gait stability and endurance, thus potentially reducing the risk of fall as measured by FGA and 2MWT. Application of cerebellar tDCS during SBT walking had no additional effect on locomotor outcomes.
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NHE
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Re: Split-Belt Training

Post by NHE »

Split-belt Treadmill


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1eye
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Re: Split-Belt Training

Post by 1eye »

This split belt stuff looks great. I can only do a treadmill if I hold on with my hands, so I would be looking to try to go hands-free after the split-belt version. I wonder if I can get the rehab hospital to get hold of one of these.

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Petr75
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Re: Split-Belt Training

Post by Petr75 »

2023 Jun 9
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA
Split-Belt Treadmill Adaptation Improves Spatial and Temporal Gait Symmetry in People with Multiple Sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/37420623/

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by degradation of the myelin sheath resulting in impaired neural communication throughout the body. As a result, most people with MS (PwMS) experience gait asymmetries between their legs leading to an increased risk of falls. Recent work indicates that split-belt treadmill adaptation, where the speed of each leg is controlled independently, can decrease gait asymmetries for other neurodegenerative impairments. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of split-belt treadmill training to improve gait symmetry in PwMS. In this study, 35 PwMS underwent a 10 min split-belt treadmill adaptation paradigm, with the faster paced belt moving under the more affected limb. Step length asymmetry (SLA) and phase coordination index (PCI) were the primary outcome measures used to assess spatial and temporal gait symmetries, respectively. It was predicted that participants with a worse baseline symmetry would have a greater response to split-belt treadmill adaptation. Following this adaptation paradigm, PwMS experienced aftereffects that improved gait symmetry, with a significant difference between predicted responders and nonresponders in both SLA and PCI change (p < 0.001). Additionally, there was no correlation between SLA and PCI change. These findings suggest that PwMS retain the ability for gait adaptation, with those most asymmetrical at baseline demonstrating the greatest improvement, and that there may be separate neural mechanisms for spatial and temporal locomotor adjustments.
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Re: Split-Belt Training

Post by Jaded »

This is also good - both move in same direction but at different speeds

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Petr75
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Re: Split-Belt Training

Post by Petr75 »

2024 Feb 6
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA
Propulsive Force Modulation Drives Split-Belt Treadmill Adaptation in People with Multiple Sclerosis
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38400224/

Abstract

Most people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) experience significant gait asymmetries between their legs during walking, leading to an increased risk of falls. Split-belt treadmill training, where the speed of each limb is controlled independently, alters each leg's stepping pattern and can improve gait symmetry in PwMS. However, the biomechanical mechanisms of this adaptation in PwMS remain poorly understood. In this study, 32 PwMS underwent a 10 min split-belt treadmill adaptation paradigm with the more affected (MA) leg moving twice as fast as the less affected (LA) leg. The most noteworthy biomechanical adaptation observed was increased peak propulsion asymmetry between the limbs. A kinematic analysis revealed that peak dorsiflexion asymmetry and the onset of plantarflexion in the MA limb were the primary contributors to the observed increases in peak propulsion. In contrast, the joints in the LA limb underwent only immediate reactive adjustments without subsequent adaptation. These findings demonstrate that modulation during gait adaptation in PwMS occurs primarily via propulsive forces and joint motions that contribute to propulsive forces. Understanding these distinct biomechanical changes during adaptation enhances our grasp of the rehabilitative impact of split-belt treadmill training, providing insights for refining therapeutic interventions aimed at improving gait symmetry.
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