Step 1: Assess/Correct Your Nutrient Imbalances

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Step 1: Assess/Correct Your Nutrient Imbalances

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jun 22, 2011 6:07 pm

If you have an MS diagnosis, you are likely to have a constellation of nutrient imbalances that have been extensively researched.

If you are considering invasive surgery as a preventive measure, you might be interested in optimizing nutritional status first, or in conjunction with, any CCSVI investigations.

The first thing to understand when beginning nutrition investigations, is the unfortunate language of the lab. Specifically, the term 'normal'.

The 'normal' range is often quite a broad range which in many cases includes both sick and healthy people.

There is a much smaller range within the normal range that can be described as 'optimal'.

For example, the normal range for zinc is 10-20 umol/L. ms patients average in the low teens. healthy controls average in the high teens.

One example of the danger of the word 'normal' is this: recently a patient here at TIMS asked for a zinc test and was told the level was fine. When the patient asked for the number it came back 10.083 umol/L. This patient was not told that the level was suboptimal, or even borderline deficient, just that it was 'fine' - ie the computer did not red flag it because the value was within the min and max setpoints. (6/30 edit: i was reading a source today which listed the normal range for zinc as 11.5 - 18.5 umol/L so by that definition of normal, the TIMS patient was actually deficient. just a different set up at the lab and you're fine :roll:)

Another example: the normal range for uric acid is 140-360 umol/L. MS patients average 194 umol/L. Healthy controls sit in the 290-300 umol/L range. Interestingly, uric acid levels are positively correlated with zinc levels. So if you are low in zinc you are likely to be low in uric acid too. read more: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 1787800416

Suspect nutrients for MS patients include but are not limited to:

vitamin b complex (all of them, particularly b12)
vitamin e
vitamin d3
magnesium
selenium
zinc
essential polyunsaturated fatty acids

All of the above are also important for optimal vascular health.

There are specific targets for vitamin d3, magnesium, zinc and uric acid here: http://www.thisisms.com/ftopicp-15460.html#15460

Note the hemoglobin minimum of 13, too.

If your lab does not use the same units as shown, feel free to ask me about conversion.

Here is a useful conversion resource:
http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/scale ... _data.html

If you have any questions feel free to comment or send me a private message.

for more info, here's where I've put together a sort of nutrition primer. there are lots of other approaches out there, this is what I have sifted from amongst the available science and through my own experience and testing: regimens-f22/topic2489.html#p15460
Last edited by jimmylegs on Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Postby munchkin » Thu Jun 30, 2011 9:01 am

Hi

I think it's great that this is at the top, I wish I had found this information earlier in the whole CCSVI process. Along with the information regarding the why's, how's, and who's of CCSVI, this location provides easy access to the nutritional information. If your body isn't healthy you will have a much harder time with any type of invasive procedure.

Thanks for putting this up.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:57 am

you are welcome, munchkin :)
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Postby cheerleader » Wed Jul 06, 2011 9:59 am

Hope it's OK to include this nutritional/lifestyle program on the CCSVI forum (since this is how it started). This was the program sent to Stanford University, and is based on Dr. John Cooke's book, The Cardiovascular Cure. It addresses the vascular aspects of MS.
hope it helps!
cheer

http://www.ccsvi.org/index.php/helping- ... ial-health
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby munchkin » Wed Jul 06, 2011 3:06 pm

The more information the better, thanks Cheerleader.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jul 07, 2011 8:15 pm

lots of great nutrition info out there, good stuff! i don't agree with it all, but together the answer is there! :)
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: Step 1: Nutrition

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Oct 18, 2011 3:56 pm

example of an important nutritional piece of the puzzle

http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/con ... 1164.short
Effect of magnesium on restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: a clinical and angiographic evaluation in a randomized patient population
Abstract
Restenosis is a major clinical problem following successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Since magnesium has vasodilator and antithrombotic effects, this study was designed to evaluate its potential to decrease the rate of restenosis.
In an open-labelled, randomized controlled study, 148 patients underwent successful coronary angioplasty. Ninety-eight patients were treated with ...[IV] magnesium sulphate ... 49 of them continued with oral supplements of magnesium hydroxide 600 mg. ... 50 patients served as controls (group C).
... A trend towards a lower rate of restenosis (>50% reduction in luminal diameter) was noticed in the magnesium groups (28/110, 25%) compared with the control group (20/53, 38%) P=0.10. ...
It is concluded that intravenous administration of magnesium in patients undergoing coronary angioplasty is feasible and safe and that the beneficial trend of magnesium to prevent acute recoil and late (within 6 months) restenosis is encouraging and should promote further investigation in a larger patient population.


i'd be interested to see a study which compared serum magnesium levels in subjects with and without stenosis...
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: Step 1: Nutrition

Postby arabia » Thu Apr 19, 2012 11:07 am

jimmylegs wrote:If you have an MS diagnosis, you are likely to have a constellation of nutrient imbalances that have been extensively researched.

If you are considering invasive surgery as a preventive measure, you might be interested in optimizing nutritional status first, or in conjunction with, any CCSVI investigations.

The first thing to understand when beginning nutrition investigations, is the unfortunate language of the lab. Specifically, the term 'normal'.

The 'normal' range is often quite a broad range which in many cases includes both sick and healthy people.

There is a much smaller range within the normal range that can be described as 'optimal'.

For example, the normal range for zinc is 10-20 umol/L. ms patients average in the low teens. healthy controls average in the high teens.

One example of the danger of the word 'normal' is this: recently a patient here at TIMS asked for a zinc test and was told the level was fine. When the patient asked for the number it came back 10.083 umol/L. This patient was not told that the level was suboptimal, or even borderline deficient, just that it was 'fine' - ie the computer did not red flag it because the value was within the min and max setpoints. (6/30 edit: i was reading a source today which listed the normal range for zinc as 11.5 - 18.5 umol/L so by that definition of normal, the TIMS patient was actually deficient. just a different set up at the lab and you're fine :roll:)

Another example: the normal range for uric acid is 140-360 umol/L. MS patients average 194 umol/L. Healthy controls sit in the 290-300 umol/L range. Interestingly, uric acid levels are positively correlated with zinc levels. So if you are low in zinc you are likely to be low in uric acid too. read more: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 1787800416

Suspect nutrients for MS patients include but are not limited to:

vitamin b complex (all of them, particularly b12)
vitamin e
vitamin d3
magnesium
selenium
zinc
essential polyunsaturated fatty acids

All of the above are also important for optimal vascular health.

There are specific targets for vitamin d3, magnesium, zinc and uric acid here: http://www.thisisms.com/ftopicp-15460.html#15460

Note the hemoglobin minimum of 13, too.

If your lab does not use the same units as shown, feel free to ask me about conversion.

Here is a useful conversion resource:
http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/scale ... _data.html

If you have any questions feel free to comment or send me a private message.


thanks
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Re: Step 1: Nutrition

Postby jimmylegs » Fri May 04, 2012 3:40 pm

you're welcome :) sorry i did not notice your post til just now :S oops!
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
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Re: Step 1: Assess/Correct Your Nutrient Imbalances

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Apr 22, 2013 7:42 am

new updates to overall nutrition approach here:
regimens-f22/topic2489.html
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
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Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Re: Step 1: Assess/Correct Your Nutrient Imbalances

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jul 04, 2013 5:35 am

on protecting yourself from damage associated with sudden new blood flow.. some reasons to consider optimizing your nutrient status prior to a CCSVI procedure

Cytokines, Neuropeptides, and Reperfusion Injury during Magnesium Deficiency
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... x/abstract

Protective effects of magnesium against ischaemia-reperfusion injury through inhibition of P-selectin in rats.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17973860

The effects of magnesium pretreatment on reperfusion injury during living donor liver transplantation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3121087/
READ ME key info on nutrient targets - www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2489.html
my approach: no meds so far - just nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory whole foods, and supplements where needed
info: www.whfoods.com, www.nutritiondata.com
User avatar
jimmylegs
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Posts: 9273
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm


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