Dr. Arslan interviewed about CCSVI

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Dr. Arslan interviewed about CCSVI

Postby Cece » Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:13 pm

www.ksat.com/health/28564250/detail.html
The fifth patient was the worst patient that I had ever treated. He came in, in a wheelchair, his arms and legs were contracted. His movements were very, very limited. He couldn’t even turn his head. He couldn’t clear his throat. He could not speak. He was legally blind. It was almost like a coma situation. We had to do his venogram from the left side because we could not straighten his right knee. We did this procedure, and he had the worst blockages until then. One side was approximately 99 percent blocked, and incessantly neurologists will ask, “Well, what about the gradient in the vein?” To prove a blockage to be real or not, you have to show that the blood pressure in the vein above the blockage as well as below the blockage has a significant difference. In him, it was a 18-millimeter mercury, which is very rare for the veins. You should have zero to tree pressure difference in the veins. So for him, 18-millimeter mercury pressure difference in the veins above and below the blockages on both sides, was very dramatic. You can never see that in a normal person. Period! We treated one of his sides with the balloon. The other side was completely blocked. It wouldn’t open up with the balloon, so I had to put a stent in, which I don’t like to do but in his case it had to be done because there was literally nothing to lose. He was supposed to come for his 4-week follow–up. He didn’t, so I was worried that he did not have any improvements. He showed up another 4-weeks later. He was able to move his arms. He is started to see. His vision went from 20/200 to 20/30. On his initial visit, his wife had to translate everything that he said because I was unable to understand him. But during the follow up visit he had this whole conversation with me with a very clear voice. He was still in a wheelchair, but he was able to eat, able to move his arms with contractures improved. He used to have 3-4 severe headache episodes everyday, which he did not have any since the day of the procedure. After that case, I had no question in my mind regarding the efficacy of this procedure.

A wow story....

Also what do you make of the pressure difference Dr. Arslan is discussing?
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Re: Dr. Arslan interviewed about CCSVI

Postby frodo » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:06 am

Cece wrote:
Also what do you make of the pressure difference Dr. Arslan is discussing?


Unfortunately this does not prove causality between CCSVI and MS, because the lack of proper flow in the veins could have come after being confined in a wheelchair.

On the other hand, this shows beyond any doubt that pressure in the veins is a problem and to correct it can improve some symptoms normally attributed to MS. I would say this could be enough motivation to ask for the procedure.
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Postby Cece » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:07 am

In this one patient, there was a measureable pressure difference. This was also a patient with 99% blockages on both sides if I am reading right. So it might take that sort of extreme blockage to be able to capture the pressure difference. My understanding of the veins, since it is all one big system, is that the pressure effects disperse and are not measureable in the typical CCSVI patient that does not have bilateral severe stenoses like that.
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Postby erinc14 » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:19 am

wow indeed :!:
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