Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

A forum to discuss Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency and its relationship to Multiple Sclerosis.

Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Oct 26, 2011 3:17 pm

of possible interest, if you have not seen this abstract previously:

http://eurheartj.oxfordjournals.org/con ... 4.abstract

Effect of magnesium on restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: a clinical and angiographic evaluation in a randomized patient population
A pilot study

"Restenosis is a major clinical problem following successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Since magnesium has vasodilator and antithrombotic effects, this study was designed to evaluate its potential to decrease the rate of restenosis...

"A trend towards a lower rate of restenosis (>50% reduction in luminal diameter) was noticed in the magnesium groups (28/110, 25%) compared with the control group (20/53, 38%) P=0.10...

"...intravenous administration of magnesium in patients undergoing coronary angioplasty is feasible and safe and that the beneficial trend of magnesium to prevent acute recoil and late (within 6 months) restenosis is encouraging and should promote further investigation ..."
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby Cece » Wed Oct 26, 2011 3:37 pm

I've added magnesium to my supplements, starting this summer.

We can't say if the magnesium effect against recoil holds true on veins, when this abstract was on arteries, but it might, and there are other reasons too to take magnesium.
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Oct 27, 2011 4:56 am

fyi

Factors modifying contraction-relaxation cycle in vascular smooth muscles
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/243/5/H641.short
"Contraction-relaxation cycles in vascular smooth muscles are largely dependent on the regulation of free Ca2+ in the myoplasm, as is the case in skeletal and cardiac muscles."

Calcium Movements, Distribution, and Functions in Smooth Muscle
http://www.vm.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp/yakuri/pa ... %20rev.pdf
"MAGNESIUM ION. In rat aortic cells (Zhang et al., 1992), removal of external Mg2+ increased [Ca2+]i and changed cell shape. In rabbit aorta and ear artery, rat aorta and guinea pig aorta, removal of external Mg2+ gradually augmented the caffeine-induced contraction without changing the contraction induced by norepinephrine or high K+, possibly by decreasing cytosolic Mg2+ level and activating CICR (Karaki et al., 1987). In rabbit urinary bladder detrusor muscle (Yu et al., 1995), addition of Mg2+ inhibited carbachol-induced contraction accompanied by a decrease in [Ca2+]i. In porcine trachea (Kumasaka et al., 1996), addition of Mg2+ inhibited contractions and increased [Ca2+]i elicited with high K+ or carbachol. In rat carotid artery (Karaki, 1989b), addition of Mg2+ relaxed contraction induced by high K1 accompanied by a decrease in [Ca2+]i. In swine carotid artery (D’Angelo et al., 1992), addition of Mg2+ decreased histamine-stimulated [Ca2+]i and force to resting values. However, Mg2+ only transiently decreased MLC phosphorylation, suggesting that Mg2+ induces relaxation by decreasing [Ca2+]i and, also, by dissociating MLC phosphorylation from [Ca2+]i and force. This finding also suggests the presence of an MLC phosphorylation-independent (yet potentially Ca2+-dependent) mechanism for regulation of force in vascular smooth muscle."

wikipedia:
"Vascular smooth muscle refers to the particular type of smooth muscle found within, and composing the majority of the wall of blood vessels.
Arteries have a great deal more smooth muscle within their walls than veins..."

so magnesium either has to work harder to be effective in arterial smooth muscle, therefore its job would be easier in venous smooth muscle, or it has less to work with in venous smooth muscle, and would be less of a factor in relaxation.

however, given the fact that magnesium appears to regulate calcium/contraction-relaxation in all varieties of smooth muscle, it may be reasonable to assume benefit in veins also.

update: Magnesium ions control prostaglandin reactivity of venous smooth muscle from spontaneously hypertensive rats.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7394065
"...Recent findings from our laboratory indicate that magnesium ions ([Mg2+]o) play a role in the control of vascular tone, vascular reactivity and Ca2+ content and its distribution in blood vessels. The present study indicates that reactivity of isolated portal venous smooth muscle, obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats, is markedly reduced in the absence of [Mg2+]. ... These new data suggest that Mg2+ may be an important and overlooked factor in the etiology of hypertensive vascular disease."
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby cheerleader » Thu Oct 27, 2011 9:04 am

Magnesium is terrific. Jimmy got Jeff on it way back, for spasms. He was taking Natural Calm back then.
When researching the endothelium (which affects both veins and arteries via nitric oxide) I learned that mg was helpful in reducing endothelial dysfunction.
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/102/19/2353.full


It is known that the vascular endothelium plays a key role in circulatory homeostasis through its ability to regulate the vascular milieu via the synthesis and release of biologically active substances, such as endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF).9 10 The endothelium influences not only vascular tone but also vascular remodeling, as well as hemostasis and thrombosis, through platelet, coagulant, and fibrin effects.11 12 In atherosclerotic arteries, these functions of the endothelium are impaired and potentiate an adverse pathophysiology through increased vasoconstriction (ie, paradoxical vasoconstriction)12 13 and thrombosis.12 It has been suggested that by reducing cardiovascular risk factors, the modification or reversal of endothelial dysfunction may be of significant therapeutic benefit in the treatment of CAD.12 14

In conclusion, we demonstrated that an oral magnesium intervention for 6 months in CAD patients results in significant improvement in brachial artery endothelial function and exercise tolerance, suggesting a potential mechanism by which magnesium could beneficially alter outcomes in patients with CAD.


Mg is in the program, but it's suggested that it be taken with zinc and calcium (per Jimmy's advice again), to balance these essential minerals.
I found a great supplement with all 3, and Jeff's been on them a couple of years. He doesn't need Natural Calm (or baclofen) anymore, since his night time spasms are gone since venoplasty.
THANKS for all the help, Jimmy....you've always been an incredible resource on this site, and you helped steer me in so many ways, to help Jeff.
xo,
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby JCB » Thu Oct 27, 2011 12:34 pm

Which supplement did you find that had all three, if I may ask?
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Oct 27, 2011 1:48 pm

yvw cheer :D

yep i remember the natural calm (citrate) days, thing of the past now though. i had a crazy journey with magnesium glycinate, but have figured out how to use it properly now!

great find re the blended supplement. since ms patients are known to be generally low in both zinc and magnesium, these are really wise components of any ms regimen. and given how many different 'jobs' each does, i would suggest these two are particularly fundamental.

ttfn!
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby lovebug » Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:28 pm

Yes `Cheerleader` could you tell us what supplement Jeff is on?
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby cheerleader » Fri Oct 28, 2011 8:00 am

hey guys-
I found Nature's Way Calcium, Mag and Zinc mineral complex (advanced chelate form provides optimal absorption)
one serving =3 capsules=500mg. calcium, 250mg. mag, 15mg zinc.
It works for him and his levels are good now, but some may need more zinc or more mag....
it's good to take these 3 together.
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby CureOrBust » Fri Oct 28, 2011 5:45 pm

One thing I have always wondered, but been too afraid to ask X_X although I do not see why not, is if the Magnesium in Magnesium Citrate, equivalently bio-available, as that in other forms? I take the Citrate form because I think I can really notice the help at night with restless leg (on and off symtom) within hours of taking it, without any effect on bowel function, although MagOxide only has a very mild effect anyway; I would really not have noticed it if you hadn't of pointed it out. But I have done a much bigger single dose with Mag Citrate.
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Oct 28, 2011 6:00 pm

hey! so, mag citrate is more absorbable than mag oxide. and other forms like glycinate are more absorbable than citrate! hth :D
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby CureOrBust » Fri Oct 28, 2011 7:20 pm

jimmylegs wrote:hey! so, mag citrate is more absorbable than mag oxide. and other forms like glycinate are more absorbable than citrate! hth :D
It it known why Mag Citrate helps restless leg more than other forms? or does Mag Glycinate work even better? I have never seen this one in stores, and only see Mag Citrate very rarely (i get it on-line)
OK, I got off my butt and did a search for myself, and the first web site I hit mentions the glycinate form, and not the citrate. I would guess its all about the bioavailibility of the mag.
http://www.restlesslegsyndromecure.com/cause.html
This also makes me want to try more B vitamins before bed... I love vivid dreams!
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Oct 29, 2011 1:44 am

lol! and it's true, by the way :D
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Oct 31, 2011 12:52 pm

ps i agree re bioavailability :)
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Intravenous magnesium and restenosis

Postby MarkW » Tue Nov 01, 2011 10:58 am

Interesting data Jimmylegs. The beneficial effect mainly comes from intravenous Mg used directly after the angioplasty. Another area of research for interventionalists. The only issue I foresee is patients will not want to have an infusion after the procedure.
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Mark Walker - Oxfordshire, England. Registered Pharmacist (UK). 11 years of study around MS.
Mark's CCSVI Report 7-Mar-11:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/8359854/MS-experts-in-Britain-have-to-open-their-minds.html
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Re: Effect of magnesium on restenosis ...

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:45 pm

i suspect the beneficial effect is due to a low background level in patients of such surgeries. i'd be interested to see a comparision of serum magnesium levels in angioplasty patients vs healthy controls! since i can't find such a thing, here's the best substitute i can come up with on short notice (i can't really decide what to highlight because it would be mostly bolded anyway, so, read on!):

"Hypomagnesemia is common in hospitalized patients, especially in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or those with chronic heart failure. Hypomagnesemia is associated with increased all cause mortality and mortality from CAD. Magnesium supplementation improves myocardial metabolism, inhibits calcium accumulation and myocardial cell death; it improves vascular tone, peripheral vascular resistance, afterload and cardiac output, reduces cardiac arrhythmias and improves lipid metabolism. Magnesium also reduces vulnerability to oxygen-derived free radicals, improves endothelial function and inhibits platelet function, including platelet aggregation and adhesion, which potentially confers upon magnesium physiologic and natural effects similar to adenosine-diphosphate inhibitors such as clopidogrel. However, data regarding the use of magnesium in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are conflicting. Although some previous relatively small randomized clinical trials demonstrated a remarkable reduction in mortality when intravenous magnesium was administered to relatively high risk AMI patients, two recently published large-scale randomized clinical trials (the Fourth International Study of Infarct Survival [ISIS 4] and Magnesium in Coronaries [MAGIC]) were unable to demonstrate any advantage of intravenous magnesium over placebo. Nevertheless, the theoretical benefits of magnesium supplementation as a cardio-protective agent in CAD patients, promising results from animal and human studies, its relatively low-cost and ease of handling requiring no special expertise, together with its excellent tolerability, gives magnesium a place in treating CAD patients, especially in those at high risk, such as CAD patients with heart failure, the elderly and hospitalized patients with hypomagnesemia. Furthermore, magnesium therapy is indicated in life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias such as torsades de pointes and intractable ventricular tachycardia."

(note re the AMI section - i'd suggest that waiting until patients are actually having a heart attack before testing the efficacy of magnesium might be a slightly cart before the horse approach, but that's just me)
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