Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

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Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby NHE » Mon Dec 03, 2012 1:27 am

Pterostilbene protects vascular endothelial cells against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.
Apoptosis. 2012 Jan;17(1):25-36.

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) apoptosis is the main event occurring during the development of atherosclerosis. Pterostilbene (PT), a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, has been the subject of intense research in cancer and inflammation. However, the protective effects of PT against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced apoptosis in VECs have not been clarified. We investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of PT in vitro and in vivo in mice. PT at 0.1-5 μM possessed antioxidant properties comparable to that of trolox in a cell-free system. Exposure of human umbilical vein VECs (HUVECs) to oxLDL (200 μg/ml) induced cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and cell apoptosis, but PT protected against such injuries. In addition, PT injection strongly decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the endothelium of atherosclerotic plaque from apoE(-/-) mice. OxLDL increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, NF-κB activation, p53 accumulation, apoptotic protein levels and caspases-9 and -3 activities and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cytochrome c release in HUVECs. These alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with PT. PT inhibited the expression of lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) expression in vitro and in vivo. Cotreatment with PT and siRNA of LOX-1 synergistically reduced oxLDL-induced apoptosis in HUVECs. Overexpression of LOX-1 attenuated the protection by PT and suppressed the effects of PT on oxLDL-induced oxidative stress. PT may protect HUVECs against oxLDL-induced apoptosis by downregulating LOX-1-mediated activation through a pathway involving oxidative stress, p53, mitochondria, cytochrome c and caspase protease. PT might be a potential natural anti-apoptotic agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis.
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Re: Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby 1eye » Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:10 am

So how does pterostilbene occur naturally?
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Re: Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby NHE » Mon Dec 03, 2012 10:47 pm

1eye wrote:So how does pterostilbene occur naturally?


Pterostilbene is an antioxidant found in blueberries and, to a lesser extent, grapes. However, blueberries are the principle source. It's chemically related to resveratrol. However, while resveratrol has three hydroxyl groups making it a polyphenol, pterostilbene only has one. The other two have converted to methoxy groups. This makes pterostilbene more lipophilic and increases its absorption 4x over resveratrol (at least if you're a lab rat). It also gives pterostilbene somewhat different physiological activity in the body. Pterostilbene has been found to be nontoxic in mice given doses as high as 3g/kg. A recent clinical study at the University of Mississippi found that it also lowers blood pressure though most of the papers in PubMed discuss its effects on cancer.

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Re: Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby cheerleader » Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:20 pm

Cool! Thanks for the info, NHE. Never heard of pterostilbene before...nor do I think I can say it :)
One of our favorite snacks is walnuts and dried blueberries. We have a little bowl on the counter at all times.
Dr. Terry Wahls has a great saying...the deeper the color of the fruit or vegetable, the more potent the antioxidants. And if the color goes all the way through, even better. Which is why berries are higher in antioxidants than apples or bananas.
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dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
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Re: Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby NHE » Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:25 am

One of our favorite snacks is walnuts and dried blueberries. We have a little bowl on the counter at all times.


That sounds like a great combination. The healthy fat from the walnuts will increase the absorption of the phytochemicals in the blueberries.

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Re: Pterostilbene protects the endothelium

Postby lyndacarol » Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:25 pm

NHE wrote:
1eye wrote:So how does pterostilbene occur naturally?


Pterostilbene is an antioxidant found in blueberries and, to a lesser extent, grapes. However, blueberries are the principle source. It's chemically related to resveratrol. However, while resveratrol has three hydroxyl groups making it a polyphenol, pterostilbene only has one. The other two have converted to methoxy groups. This makes pterostilbene more lipophilic and increases its absorption 4x over resveratrol (at least if you're a lab rat). It also gives pterostilbene somewhat different physiological activity in the body. Pterostilbene has been found to be nontoxic in mice given doses as high as 3g/kg. A recent clinical study at the University of Mississippi found that it also lowers blood pressure though most of the papers in PubMed discuss its effects on cancer.

NHE


This antioxidant, pterostilbene, was discussed yesterday on The Dr. Oz Show: http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/5-energ ... ideo=16393

But our very own NHE has supplied much more information here!
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