progesterone and MS

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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Liberation » Mon Jan 16, 2012 3:09 am

thanks for the posts, ikulo. They are really great. As a male, I am just wondering what I can do with these hormones. Is there any reference level of the sex hormones for a male? What level should we target? What could be the side effects of using a natural progesterone cream for a male?

It would be good to talk to a doctor, but neurologists are really against doing anything other than prescribing the usual drugs, while other doctors just do not want to interfere as it is ms.

I am also just wondering what are the other ways of increaing the neurosteroid level (like allopregnanolone)?
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby ikulo » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:34 pm

Hey Lib,

I haven't done enough research on the reference levels. I just got new health insurance so I haven't been able to get to a doc to check levels. I'm hoping to get into a naturopath sometime soon to get my levels checked, naturopaths seem to be more open toward hormones, herbals, etc. Will keep you posted.
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby SaraG » Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:10 pm

I have been on the Mirena IUD for 7 years. Before that I lost 2 pregnancies due to extremely low progesterone but had two children with treatment. When I was trying to figure out birth control my gyno suggested Mirena and told me it worked by somehow stimulating the body to make too much progesterone to allow fertilization. I quickly felt better and even though I was later diagnosed with MS (wit many many years of symptoms) I was loathe to have it removed because I really felt it had somehow helped me. Maybe, maybe not and purely anecdotal but I have felt very strongly that having it permanently removed would be a mistake for me. However, I am always hesitant to recommend it to friends because I have read some women have not liked it (possibly women who already make enough Progesterone end up with way too much?) Anyway, just thought I'd throw that out there.
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Shayk » Mon Feb 27, 2012 12:59 pm

Hi again

There's a new open access (free) article on progesterone :smile:

Progesterone Synthesis in the Nervous System: Implications for Myelination and Myelin Repair

If you're at all interested in progesterone I think it's well worth the read; there is a small section on MS and progesterone in the article.

And guys, you may be interested in this abstract: Progesterone: The Forgotten Hormone in Men?
Other progesterone effects in men include those on the central nervous system (CNS) (mainly mediated by 5alpha-reduced progesterone metabolites as so-called neurosteroids)


And in this commentary by Dr. John R Lee (now deceased) Hormone Balance in Males

And they wonder why people with MS lose the ability to remyelinate? Could it be in part due to declining hormone levels (including progesterone?) It's my understanding that in women at least progesterone levels start to decrease before estrogen levels start dropping.

Take care

Sharon
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Thekla » Tue Jun 24, 2014 1:57 pm

I started using a prescription progesterone creme and 8mg estriol again last month. I have heard it takes several months to really see benefits. When are others taking it? Morning or evening? Should I do them together?
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Shayk » Thu Jun 26, 2014 5:40 pm

Great question Thekla

I wouldn’t take them together. I try to take my estriol and progesterone at least 4 hours apart. I use progesterone cream in the morning and late evening. My 8 mg estriol is compounded with 100 mg. progesterone which I take late afternoon but obviously “together”. LOL

The reason I try to space the timing is based primarily on this abstract:
Progesterone reverses 17beta-estradiol mediated neuroprotection and BDNF induction in cultured hippocampal neurons
Our results indicate that E2 neuroprotective effects are mediated through the BDNF pathway and that, under certain conditions, P4 antagonizes the protective effect of estrogen.

Clearly, that research isn't about estriol per se and hasn’t even reached mice yet so it’s very early but it gave me a heads up to try and separate the time when I took them. I also checked out (years ago) the half-life of estriol in serum and it was very short—as I recall about 2 hours. It’s interesting because in the latest clinical trial of estriol the 8 mg will be taken in 4 2mg doses throughout the day.
Estriol Treatment in MS: Effect on Cognition

I also want to emphasize that MPA which is used in HRT in the US has some risks: Use of MPA for hormone therapy in post menopausal women: Is it safe?
Research into mechanisms by which MPA might cause adverse effects in these areas, combined with the available clinical evidence, suggests a small increase in relative risk for breast cancer and stroke, and a decline in cognitive function, in older women using MPA with an estrogen for postmenopausal HT.

And, there’s this: Differential effects of synthetic progestagens on neuron survival and estrogen neuroprotection in cultured neurons.
We found that medroxyprogesterone acetate decreased both ERα and ERβ expression and blocked E2-mediated neuroprotection and BDNF expression.

All to say I’d definitely stick with bioidentical progesterone. For me, it did take several months to see the benefits of progesterone. All the best to you.

Sharon
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Thekla » Fri Jun 27, 2014 1:20 am

Do you take a break from the progesterone during the month? I have read to take a week off to simulate natural fluctuations. I have also read that it can accumulate in fatty tissues affecting results.

What kind of benefits are you getting? I've been taking estriol in the am and progesterone before bed. Thanks ;-)
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby Shayk » Fri Jun 27, 2014 8:46 am

Hi Thekla

I don't take a break from progesterone during the month....I was diagnosed post menopause (at 57) so I didn't concern myself with natural fluctuations--but I have also read about taking a week off and have always assumed that applies to people pre menopause. Maybe I should do some more reading about that...

I also haven't read that it can accumulate in fatty tissues affecting results...more reading for me I guess. My reading about progesterone has really centered on its neuroprotective properties since it's considered a "neurosteriod"--made in the brain, by the brain, for the brain...I had none when I had my hormone levels tested.

I would say the primary benefit I think I've gotten from progesterone is an improved gait. I was a "drunk" MSer at diagnosis and slowly but surely after I started progesterone cream my gait improved and has stayed "steady". I essentially went from 4 kph (2.5 mph) max in 45 minutes hanging on for dear life on a treadmill to 4.8 kph (3.0 mph) max in 10 seconds not holding on. I've never had an EDSS but neuro guesstimates 0-1. Eleven years after diagnosis I still have heat (humidity) sensitivity and fatigue.

Hope that helps....do let us know how you do. Have a great week end.

Sharon
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Re: progesterone and MS

Postby misslux » Sat Jul 05, 2014 7:00 am

Interesting thread. I know for me I feel best and can function a lot better the first week of my cycle where all my hormone levels are even. It is the difference between being able to walk 100 metres without stopping versus barely 15-20 metres with much difficulty. Less fatigue, better mobility, less spasticity and less neuropathy/paraesthesia.

I have approached my GP, neuro and physiatrist about hormone therapy before but I'm going to get my SO to film me at different points of my cycle and ask again. It really is a dramatic difference.
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