A new concept and treatment options for MS

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antibiotic treatment for MS

Postby Leonard » Wed Aug 17, 2011 7:06 am

Around 2000, several years before I was diagnosed with a MS (in 2004), I had problems with a spasticity of the colon. In 2002, I even had a colon examination: coloscopy with ileoscopy and biopsy. But nothing came out.

The problems resolved more or less in 2007 -unintentionally and unexpected- about half a year after I had started with a low fat (and probably as a result of that a low sugar) diet to get control over the MS progression.

The cause of our MS is our gut. I had the two really not linked together, or perhaps in my subconscience I must have thought that my intestinal problems were caused by the MS. But that turns out to be so wrong; it turns out to be just the other way around!

Now, with the new insights, it is clear that the chronic infection of the bowel causes the gut problems. And eventually the brain problem i.e. our MS! See also:
Proinflammatory T-cell responses to gut microbiota promote experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis http://www.pnas.org/content/108/suppl.1/4615.full.pdf

The article also provides an indication for treatment. Quote: Several studies have, however, reported the use of antibiotics in protecting animals from EAE (40–42). It is also noteworthy to mention that, in clinical trials studies, the antibiotic minocycline has shown initial promise as a therapeutic for human MS (43, 44). The target of the antibiotic (i.e., pathogen and/or commensal bacteria) is unknown. Unquote

Well, that has changed now. I think it is ever more likely that the target of the antibiotics is these segmented filamentous bacteria. See e.g.: The key role of segmented filamentous bacteria in the coordinated maturation of gut helper T cell responses.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19833089

If we want to tackle the bowel infection by antibiotics, minocycline comes into the picture.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21565409
http://www.natap.org/2010/newsUpdates/MinoNeuro.pdf
It works by decreasing bacteria's ability to make protein (which it needs to survive).
http://antibiotics.emedtv.com/minocycli ... cline.html

And possibly there may be other antibiotics too. I found some interesting postings on the Antibiotics chapter of this forum:
http://www.thisisms.com/forum-28.html
This article that I found there may also be of interest and shows big pharma's have seen this: http://www.paratekpharm.com/docs/ARTICLE12112006.pdf

This development may all be part of a much bigger picture that emerges on:
http://natmednews.posterous.com/faecal- ... -parkinson
I quote "Diabetes and even obesity, as well as Parkinson's disease, might be cured just by replacing the bacteria in your gut."
As far as I am concerned, we could add MS to that list.
Last edited by Leonard on Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Leonard » Thu Aug 18, 2011 10:10 pm

and this: http://www.physorg.com/news198765070.html
Biologists at the California Institute of Technology have demonstrated a connection between multiple sclerosis (MS) -- an autoimmune disorder that affects the brain and spinal cord -- and gut bacteria.
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Leonard, Candidiasis/Candida causes leaky gutt

Postby fee001 » Fri Aug 19, 2011 12:05 am

Candidiasis
Summary

Candidiasis is a fungal infection produced by a species of Candida Fungi, particularly Candida Albicans. Candida fungi normally reside harmlessly in various parts of the body.

If the healthy bacteria in the digestive tract becomes seriously depleted the candida proliferate and can produce root like structures which damage the villi along the intestinal tract leading to a 'leaky gut'.

There are many causes of candidiasis cited, such as: repeated antibiotic use, poor diet, steroid medications, birth control pills, malnutrition, cytotoxic drugs.

Symptoms of candidiasis include: chronic fatigue, depression, yeast infections, bloating, joint or muscle pain, genital itching, hyperactivity, athletes foot, hair loss.


Candidiasis is a fungal infection produced by a species of Candida Fungi, especially Candida Albicans. Candida fungi are found in many places in the environment and some reside harmlessly with the other bacteria residing in the mouth, gastrointestinal tract and genitourinary tract. [1]. In a normal healthy person the immune system and the beneficial bacteria prevent the overgrowth of candida. One of the purposes of Candida Albicans in our digestive tract is to recognise and alleviate harmful bacteria. A healthy person can have millions of Candida Albicans.[2]

If the healthy bacteria in the digestive tract is reduced by antiobiotics, pesticides, chlorine or if the person's immune system has been weakened by illness (particularly by AIDs or diabetes) malnutrition or certain medications (such as corticosteroids or anti cancer drugs) the candida fungi can dramatically increase in numbers causing numerous symptoms. Also poor diet, alcohol and incorrect pH in the digestive system can cause candida to proliferate and invade the body.

In it's normal yeast state candida is harmless but as a fungus it becomes invasive producing root like structures called rhizoids that can push through the mucous membranes or intestinal walls damaging the villi (finger like projections along the intestinal tract) and allowing undigested food particles, toxins and bacteria to move through the lining and enter the bloodstream resulting in leaky gut syndrome. Your antibodies attack the particles and wait for them to appear again ready for another attack when you eat the same foods. Then you end up with food intolerances and allergies as well as sensitivities to the environment. [3]. Candidiasis and Leaky Gut Syndrome often go hand in hand and left untreated can lead to advanced stages of disease.

Causes of Candidiasis

There are many causes of Candidiasis such as: repeated use of antibiotics, diet high in sugar /refined carbohydrates/processed foods, birth control pills, malnutrition, steroid medications, alcohol, cytotoxic drugs. Anything that compromises the immune system can result in the reduction of friendly bacteria in the intestines and allow Candida Albicans to proliferate.

Symptoms

Chronic fatigue, depression, yeast infections, abdominal bloating, constipation or diarrhoea, brain fog, poor memory, confusion, mood swings, chronic joint or muscle pain or weakness, allergies, hair loss, athlete's foot, recurring ear or sinus infections, nail ridges, nail fungus, flatulence, nasal congestion, indigestion/ heartburn, eczema, dark circles under eyes, bad breath, itchy scalp, constant coated tongue, skin fungus infections, genital itching, worse symptoms in damp, moldy or muggy places, sensitivities to environment, low blood sugar, carbohydrate, sugar or vinegar cravings, impotence, prostatitis, night sweats, persistent cough, hyperactivity, hyperthyroidism.

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Postby Leonard » Tue Aug 23, 2011 2:02 am

There was some confusion on a Dutch public web forum about the line that is followed in this thread. More in particular, there seems to be a contradiction in some of the postings on what is the cause of MS. The thread starts with the presumption that MS is caused by an insufficient glucose level in the brain or parts of the brain. Later on, it is then suggested that MS is caused by the segmented filamentous bacteria. I have felt a need to clarify the picture and as this may be of interest to you I post it here as well.

The lack of feeding of the cells and the role of the bacteria are not in contradiction. In fact, the things are related. One condition can develop because of the other. MS is a complex two-stage disease. What is the case?

Many years of vascular insufficiency (CCSVI, birth defect) and the resulting poor blood flow will weaken the tissue of vessel walls in the affected draining veins. This is caused by poor micro-cellular feeding condition (with glucose and/or oxygen), possibly aggravated by such things as iron depositions and inflammation of vessel walls (endothelium which tries to correct things). The fact that MS is veno-centric further supports this view. After many years of CCSVI then the tissue of the vessel walls (BBB) will get damaged, in particular around the affected draining veins.

It is well known that some bacteria may induce a powerful immune response, in particular the segmented filamentous bacteria that reside autonomously in the gut. Now then, when this happens, T-cells get activated and will proliferate through the body. Where the BBB is damaged, these T-cells can enter the brain and do their destructive work...

For those of us with very serious narrowings, the problems may occur already early on in their life. In my own case, I had symptoms of MS on 14 years of age and then on 29 and 37 years. In all cases, the GP prescribed antibiotics and vit B complex and in a matter of weeks things recovered to normal. I never knew I had MS and I guess I must have been just lucky. And probably the GP did the right thing at the time without knowing... The anti-biotics must have killed the bacteria and the immune system must have quietened down for several years...

By mid-age, the impact of the segmented filamentous bacteria will further increase. I have seen it said in the press as: "When the segmented filamentous bacteria take stage...". And because of that, the immune system will get more active, and more T-cells will proliferate through the body. I think that the increased activity of the microbiota in the gut is essentially due to a generally lower level of Vitamin D when getting older. Why is that? It is well know that as the skin grows older, it gets less effective in producing Vitamin D from cholesterol. And that is precisely what happens, see also the next posting down.. Our "Western" diet of course is a factor as well as it shifted the microbiota.

The increased T-cell activity is essentially a whole-body problem and can lead to diabetes2 later on, but also to other diseases as osteoporosis, rheumatic diseases etc. For us, the increased T cells activity will get to grips with weakened and undernourished cells in those areas where BBB is weak or damaged. With all the detrimental consequences as we know them… This must have happened to me when I got diagnosed with MS at the age of 47.

Vitamin D may modulate the gut microbiota a bit (see posting below) and may also improve micro-cellular feeding conditions a bit.

The narrowings can be treated by angioplasty.

The segmented filamentous bacteria, that originate from the gut, can be treated by antibiotics.

This is just what is MS. It is a pity that there is a whole clinical world out there that still needs to be convinced of these new insights and that things there seem to go at a glacial speed ...
Last edited by Leonard on Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:17 am, edited 7 times in total.
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The Vitamin D switch

Postby Leonard » Thu Sep 01, 2011 7:56 am

The relationship between MS and Vitamin D is well known. Now, it appears that the link is established through the gut bacteria! Whow, that is big! What is the case?

Sufficient serum 25OHD levels allow cells in the body to synthesize cathelicidin when microbiota need to be killed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathelicidin
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21605457
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/11/114

The fact that there is this interaction between Vitamin D and the gut bacteria is very powerful and further strengthens the two stage disease concept (ccsvi/bacteria) as described in the above posting.

Hence we may now conclude (see above posting):

The narrowings can be treated by angioplasty.

The segmented filamentous bacteria, that originate from the gut, can be treated by antibiotics and by maintaining a sufficienty level of Vitamin D. Also diet (low fat/low sugar; Swank) or fasting may help: see http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-17679.html

Interestingly, my exacerbations always occured in the Spring, typically April or May, when the Vitamin D level was low, and hence the bacteria got more room to play...
Last edited by Leonard on Fri Sep 02, 2011 11:20 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby fee001 » Thu Sep 01, 2011 8:35 am

Hi!


Candidiasis- leaky gut causes vitamin deficiency, and can be caused by stress antibiotics or poor diet.

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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:23 am

leaky gut has known links to zinc deficiency. once you're zinc deficient, a LOT of wheels come off and you get a nasty cascade effect on nutrient absorption among other things.

http://www.enzymestuff.com/conditionleakygut.htm
Zinc deficiency – Zinc is necessary in maintaining intestinal wall integrity. Supplementing with zinc could contribute significantly to healing a leaky gut in about eight weeks (Sturniolo 2001). Zinc is also instrumental in a maintaining a healthy immune system (Prasad 2002). The synthesis of serotonin involves zinc. Since serotonin is also necessary for melatonin synthesis, a zinc deficiency may result in low levels of both of these compounds, causing problems with the sleep cycle, calming, and hyperness.

the reference above also lists yeast as a cause alsoof candida, but the conditions for yeast overgrowth are ideal in zinc deficiency.

for example - zinc deficiency effects on candida control by immune system:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3678924637
Malnourished children have thymic atrophy which is reversed by zinc supplementation. To see if their defect in cell-mediated immunity was also associated with zinc deficiency ten children were skin-tested with Candida antigen on both arms. One test site was covered with local zinc sulphate and the other with placebo ointment. There was a highly significant increase in the typical delayed-hypersensitivity reaction at the site covered with zinc. The magnitude of the difference between the supplemented and unsupplemented arms correlated negatively with the plasma-zinc concentration. These data show that zinc deficiency is a cause of the immunoincompetence seen in malnutrition. The normal reactions of the zinc-supplemented side indicate that, of the many nutritional deficits of malnourished children, zinc deficiency specifically impairs the cell-mediated immune system. Local skintesting with and without zinc may provide a measure of zinc status. Local application of zinc may enhance the reliability of tests to diagnose diseases such as tuberculosis in malnourished patients.

http://www.arltma.com/CandidaDoc.htm
(talks about many contributing factors including...):

Zinc Deficiency
Zinc metabolism is closely related to Candida because 1) the zinc/copper balance is critical, and 2) zinc is required for many essential enzyme systems, including production of digestive enzymes and synthesis of all body proteins.
A zinc imbalance is indicated on a tissue mineral chart by a zinc level less than 12.0 mgs/% or greater than 20.0 mgs/%, or a zinc/copper ratio greater than 12.0 mgs/%. A phosphorus level greater than 16 or less than 12 may also indicate a zinc imbalance.
Deficiency of zinc is common for several reasons:
• Use of superphosphate fertilizers and hybrid crops have contributed to widespread zinc deficiency in all foods.
• Processing and refining further depletes foods of their zinc content. For example, zinc loss occurs in the conversion of whole wheat to white flour, in the conversion of sugar cane to white sugar, and in spraying of frozen and canned vegetables with EDTA to retain color.
• Foods, relatively low in zinc, such as chicken and fish are being increasingly substituted for higher-zinc foods such as beef and red meats. Soy protein, commonly substituted for beef, is low in zinc.
• Stress of any type results in zinc depletion.
• Zinc deficiency is accentuated if copper exposure is high, because of a copper-zinc antagonism. Copper exposure is higher today for several reasons:
– Birth control pills raise tissue copper levels by raising estrogen levels.
– Copper is absorbed from the Copper-7 intrauterine device.
– Water remaining in copper pipes, and consumption of high-copper foods such as soy, avocado, and chocolate are sources of copper.
– Stress causes copper levels to increase, by causing a zinc deficiency.

zinc deficiency is also implicated in inflammation. the poor diet mentioned in the reference above (specifically the sugar and refined flour) would definitely contribute to zinc deficiency as well.

diet example:
http://www.ajcn.org/content/24/10/1204.abstract
High phytate content of rural Iranian bread: a possible cause of human zinc deficiency
John G. Reinhold Ph.D.
Phytate concentrations of the unleavened flat bread (tanok or lavosh) prepared from high extraction wheaten meal in Iranian villages are much greater than those of leavened flat breads (bazari or sangak) made in commercial bakeries in cities of the same region. As a result, the phytate intake of the rural population considerably exceeds that of the urban population. Excessive intakes of phytate may explain the occurrence of overt zinc deficiency among villagers and its absence in the cities.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:27 am

ps also d3 levels are connected to zinc levels :) when i corrected my zinc deficiency my dose response to d3 supplementation tripled.
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Postby tara97 » Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:14 pm

yes I agree, I was diagnosed with small intesinal errosion about two years ago. I also know that B6 is abosrbed through the small intestine and this is important for GABA. people with neuro degenerative diseases have high glutimate which is the opposite of GABA. this is called exitotoxic. this is why you feel so gittery. high copper is also part of this. this is also hyper insulin for the insulin theorist out there. and depolarized cells and calcium load.
but heres the real question how did the stomach ulcers and small intesinal errosion occur. well what about H pylori doesnt that cause ulcers. well yes but 1st you have to ask why the heck bacteria was able to proliferate in the stomach with all that acid around. the small intestine is not an acidic place. so anyone have problems with too much acid sometimes and not enough at others. I do.
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Postby tara97 » Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:26 pm

so heres where it gets really interesting. I need cortisol to stimulate the secretion of gastric acid and drive down insulin and raise my blood pressure, could be that. but heres where it gets interesting cytochrome P450s are a huge group of proteins that catlyze enzyme reactions for drug metabolisms and sythesis of lipids, and cholesterol and steroid hormones. we need cholesterol and lipids to make fat soluable vitamins and hormones, steroid hormones. this is in the liver. We need Heme to make cytochrome p450s. in hepatic Porphyrias there is a misstep in the heme sythetic pathway not for hemoglobin but for the production of cytochrome. If you take a drug or stress too much or whatever you can overwhelm this enzyme deficiency and then the incomplete product spills into your body. heme is made up of pyroles which bind to zinc and B6 and cause its loss through the urine. so a start stop motion of these hormones is also incredibly disruptive to the clock work movement of the metabolism.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Sep 01, 2011 4:36 pm

agree!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17241300
Low concentrations of zinc in gastric mucosa are associated with increased severity of Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation.
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Re: The Vitamin D switch

Postby Leonard » Tue Sep 06, 2011 12:52 am

Leonard wrote:The relationship between MS and Vitamin D is well known. My exacerbations always occured in the Spring, typically April or May, when the Vitamin D level was low. Now, it appears that the link is established through the gut bacteria! Whow, that is big! What is the case?

Sufficient serum 25OHD levels allow cells in the body to synthesize cathelicidin when microbiota need to be killed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathelicidin
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21605457
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/11/114

The fact that there is this interaction between Vitamin D and the gut bacteria is very powerful and further strengthens the two stage disease concept (ccsvi/bacteria) as described in the above posting.

Hence we may now conclude (see also my earlier posting above):

The narrowings can be treated by angioplasty.

The segmented filamentous bacteria, that originate from the gut, can be treated by antibiotics and by maintaining a sufficienty level of Vitamin D. Also diet (low fat/low sugar; Swank-like) or fasting may help: see http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-17679.html



I am convinced that, besides antibiotics such as minocycline to help kill the gut microbiota, the most common diabetics drug Metformin helps to "reset" the gut microbiota. In fact, I believe that is precisely how Metformin helps control and stop diabetes2 progression. Some interesting work here: http://www.genetics-gsa.org/celegans201 ... f70777.htm

In my search, many working mechanisms have been suggested for Metformin. But no body really knows. I think the working mechanism of Metformin is via the gut. And, while MS in the secondary progressive phase is caused by the same bacteria, it may help MS patients as well.

My farther never had MS but when he was diagnosed with diabetes2 at around 60 years of age, he had weakenings.
This all vanished when he started his diabetes medication and diet. We are now 25 years later, and he is in good health.
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Re: I think I found it: This Is MS

Postby fee001 » Tue Sep 06, 2011 1:28 am

Leonard,

Look into Candida and leaky gut yeah. Candida is linked to type 2 diabetes. The diet includes not having sugar or yeast as feeds the fungus.

I posted some info on Candida a couple of weeks ago.

Watch out on the net as some are making money from giving info, I believe it should be free and accessible to all.

There is info on it on my blog, as I had it back in March and I believe I had it for years probably brought on by stress.

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Re: I think I found it: This Is MS

Postby tara97 » Tue Sep 06, 2011 12:40 pm

Zinc absorption in human small intestine.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2912154

heres something that talks about glucose absorption and zinc
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This Is MS

Postby Leonard » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:54 am

Put quite simply, of course CCSVI has to do with MS, and MS with CCSVI. CCSVI will often be congenital (genetic factor in MS is known). After many years of CCSVI, the tissue of the vessels (endothelium and everything that is there to help regulate the system) will get weak or damaged. The BBB becomes permeable.

Then the gut comes into the picture. Autonomous gut bacteria may trigger the immune system. These Swedish scientists were on the right track. http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... nce-of-gut In particular the segmented filamentous bacteria are suspect.

The gut micro-biota may be somewhat influenced by our diet (our "modern" Western diet that is rich in sugar is not helpful and may shift the balance to the wrong bacteria; fasting once a year is healthy, a Swank diet is too) and also by vitamin D. Yes, vitamin D helps to maintain a healthy balance in the gut !

Once the immune system is triggered, T cells will proliferate through the bloodstream. In those places where the BBB is damaged or the tissue is weakened they will do their destructive work. In our case, that will be in our CNS because there we had these damn narrowed veins. Others with an unhealthy gut micro-biota may develop diabetes2 or something else.

ThisIsMS. All that remains now is to try to get things under control. The etiology of our disease lies in the gut, combined of course with the stenoses in the neck. So that is where the focus of any treatment plan will need to be.

ECTRIMS / ACTRIMS in October 2011 will undoubtedly pay attention to this new insight. http://www.congrex.ch/ectrims2011
Last edited by Leonard on Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:49 am, edited 4 times in total.
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